Which Ammo to Choose?

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Tazfanatic33, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Tazfanatic33

    Tazfanatic33 New Member

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    I was at the range this morning and was looking at HydraShok ammo for my Glock 22 .40 caliber. They had two choices: 135 grain and 180 grain. The 135 grain was $21 and the 180 grain was $19. Not really sure what the difference would be on these. Any help would be appreciated. :D
     
  2. artz

    artz New Member

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    I would think the 135 gr. would be the choice for defense against 2 legged predators. The 180 gr. would be more for the 4 legged types. A heavier bullet will have more penetration.
    But----both will work.......
     

  3. Tazfanatic33

    Tazfanatic33 New Member

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    Thanks! I'll be picking some up the next time I go to the range. :)
     
  4. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I prefer heavy. That's just me.

    :wink:
     
  5. Tazfanatic33

    Tazfanatic33 New Member

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    Thanks

    I guess what I need to do is buy a box of both and fire them and see which one I like better. :) Thanks!
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Heavy equals more penetration, all else being equal. The reason is that mass figures more prominently in the inertia formula. Most gun rags and internet gun experts use the kinetic energy formula, which squares the velocity figure, therefore not only causing mass to factor less into the "energy" calculation, but actually causing it to be a negative factor, because increased mass always results in less velocity, with all else being equal (powder charge, &c.).

    Those who had high school or college physics may have missed a very important point about kinetic energy formulas. That is, kinetic energy is a sort of "stored energy" figure that is normally dissipated as heat once the object stops (as the object stops, really). Think of your brake pads on your car or even - slap the table really hard and you can feel the warm spot.

    This dissipation of energy lends itself to this "energy dump" theory of handgun rounds, where the theorist postulates that one stops an attacker by "dumping energy" and "energy shock" :roll: to the bad guy.

    Well, ok, whatever. But that dissipated energy requires stopping the bullet. If the bullet continues, then the energy is spread out or carried with the bullet.

    So, you get more energy dissipation if you get less penetration. Theoretically, the maximum energy transfer to the target would occur when the bullet penetrates not at all!

    I do not buy into this theory.

    Rather, I first select the largest diameter bullet for the job. Think about it this way. Go to the logical extremes. If your life was in danger, would you rather use a tiny little laser beam that would cut a pin-sized hole in your attacker, or a 3 foot wide artillery shell through the thoracic cavity :shock: , if the opportunity presented itself? Usually, this largest diamter is going to be a .45", but since it is the largest "for the job" I also have several handguns with holes in the barrel measuring about .38 inches, since those firearms were selected for their ability to conceal.

    Second, I select the heaviest bullet for that diameter that I can find, as this will, again - all else being equal, result in more penetration.

    Third, I select the highest quality bullet in that diameter and weight I can find (Speer, Federal HS, Black Talon (or Ranger :roll: ), Cor Bon, you get the point). This is where the expansion concerns come in, not first, but only after selecting the other factors.

    ___



    I recall the kinetic energy stuff from high school physics. Once I demonstrated, supposedly, using the kinetic energy formula, that a fly, flying uphill at a swift enough rate, could stop a small 40 pound boulder that was slowly rolling down the hill. My exasperated physics professor grumbled under his breath at my ineptitude and explained to me that the result would be only that the fly would leave a little more heat on the face of the rock as it continued merrily on its way down the hill, unfazed by its encounter with the fly.

    This is the same professor who set up a physics experiment relating to electricity. There were boards at every table with lights and various amounts of resistance as the wires moved closer together.

    Cool! I wonder what would happen if I just shorted the two wires together and put my pencil graphite in between them? :D I bided my time until the professor was in the back room to do something with the switchboard, and POOF!

    There was a bright flash of light and I distinctly remember pieces of graphite glowing as they flew through the air, trailing streams of smoke behing them and burning little marks into my bare forearms. The lights went out instantly. In the dark, the teacher yelled my name from the back room, shouting, "What did you do!?!"

    How did he know it was me?

    There was a blind spot in the middle of my vision for the remainder of the day.

    I still think my professor was wrong, though, about coefficients of friction and tire sizes . . . :D

    I pity the teacher that gets my son in his class.
     
  7. Tazfanatic33

    Tazfanatic33 New Member

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    Thanks Malum. I would have loved to have chemistry with you! Talk about things going boom! LOL :lol: