We're from The Government; We're Here to Help You

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Malum Prohibitum, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    If everybody knows that only the police can be trusted with guns, why was this Atlanta police officer just convicted of three bank robberies? Just curious, has any firearms license holder in Georgia been convicted of three bank robberies? Are there more license holders or more police in Georgia? Again, just curious, since I know of other officers (several, actually) who have also been convicted of armed robbery, as well as murder . . . but I do not know any license holders convicted of the same . . . May have happened - don't know any . . .

    Anyway, I guess it is ok, because he needed the money to pay the employees of his security company . . .

    Link: http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/ ... trial.html
     
  2. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Nobody replies to these types of posts . . . :roll:
     

  3. seajay

    seajay NRA Certified Instructor

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    Probably bewcause we don't ave much more information to add. There was the license holder who shot a ref at a sschool function last year. I don't remember why she shot him but I'm sure one of his calls must have upset her.
     
  4. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    Only Cops with Guns

    Only police officers and soldiers are trustworthy with guns, not civilians, right? So why was it that at the North Georgia Police Training Center in Acworth, an instructor just blew away a cadet during a training session?

    Admittedly, I've violated Rule One a few times. For example, almost every time I clean my weapon I inspect the barrel from the muzzle end, with a clean patch or white scrap of paper in the locked-open action to reflect light down the bore.

    And one time while I was investigating a shooting death that was reported as a suicide but may in fact have been a homicide, I unloaded a pistol, checked it twice, and then tried to point it at my own chest to replicate the angle that the bullet hit the victim's chest, from more than 18 inches away. I could not do it and still keep a finger on the trigger, but I came close enough that perhaps a more limber person that I could, and maybe the victim was such a person and did shoot himself in the chest from such a weird position. Or maybe he held the gun in an odd manner and pulled the trigger with his thumb or something. Anyhow, I subsequently bought two toy cap pistols-- one that looks like a revolver, and one that looks like an autopistol-- just for the purpose of recreating a crime without having to use a real firearm.

    P.S. If I'm not bright enough to check both the magazine and chamber of a gun that I know I'm about to point at myself and pull the trigger, I say GOOD RIDDANCE. Darwinism at work. But of course I'm still here!
     
  5. seajay

    seajay NRA Certified Instructor

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    I never check from the muzzle end. If I can't see down the barrel with the action open I remove the barrel and still look down it from the breach. Even when the barrel is removed I clean from the breach end and keep it pointed in a safe direction. When I was 5 and was being taught how to inspect and clean my rifle When I stuck the rod in the muzzle my dad slapped a knot on my head I'll never forget.He knew it was empty and I knew it was empty because I had looked and then shown him. He said even when it is out of the gun and looks like nothing more than an empty steal tube it will always remain a gun barel and should be handeled as a complete gun. I think he should have just told me in the beginning rather than lettimg me do it then near taking my head off.