Want to start a training business

Discussion in 'Training' started by Desler, Oct 18, 2016.

  1. Desler

    Desler New Member

    15
    0
    1
    Hey guys and ladies, I'm thinking about starting a business to provide basic pistol training. Nothing fancy, and I have no delusions about making a lot of money. I just enjoy doing it and if I can make a buck or two, great.

    Do I need to form an LLC?
    What about a federal ID?
    Business license?

    I don't have an accountant, anyone know of any resource I could use for advice?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Headspace

    Headspace Member

    101
    1
    18
    You will need an LLC to protect you in case of a law suit and a business license for your state or county. I dont think you'll need a federal ID beyond tax reasons. Good luck, If you are close enough to me I might come get my blaster dirty with you.
     

  3. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

    3,253
    521
    113
    First off have you had any training for this yourself?

    LLC is not required nor is an Employer ID as you can use your SSN if you do not plan to hire any employees.

    Resources would be available at the IRS web site.

    As a single DBA an accountant would not be needed.

    A place to hold classes would be though.
    The proper training materials.
    The Format and scheduling.
    Finding someone to actually take the course.
    Finding a range that will allow you to bring your students will also be another hard part to resolve.
    As of now it's been over 2 months since anyone signed up for one of my classes.
    My next class is scheduled for 10/30 and no one has registered for it yet. My 10/16 class just expired without a single person signing up.
    PM me if you would like to discuss and I will message back with a phone number.
     
  4. DonT

    DonT Deplorable bitter clinger.

    5,631
    245
    63
    Concur with Wegahe. Also, if you can cultivate a relationship with an indoor range, allowing you to train there, that I agree is a major hurdle. You may be able to negotiate classroom space, and if it costs you, that factors into what you charge.

    Have you considered individual coaching of students, ie, one or two folks that you work with on an hourly basis? This is what I'm considering. I know a guy right now who is doing pretty well at this, charging $75/hour for a couple hours of work on the range. He has a steady stream of students, word of mouth advertising only.
     
  5. Desler

    Desler New Member

    15
    0
    1
    Good advice.
    I am an NRA certified instructor.
    I want to hook up with a local range. I think a LLC might be good for protection.
     
  6. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

    27,535
    680
    113
    If you've got employees, maybe forming a corporation / LLC can give you some liability protection if your company is sued for the negligent actions of your staff.

    But what if YOU are the person who was negligent? Can't you be sued individually, as well as the legal entity (LLC, Inc., whatever) that you work for?

    Is there some law that says if an employee of a business harms you, you can ONLY use the business he works for and NOT sue the employee directly, individually?


    Check out this article on LLC's use as a tort liability shield for a one-man business.

    http://www.litigationandtrial.com/2...llc-to-avoid-personal-liability-in-a-lawsuit/
     
  7. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

    27,535
    680
    113
    The place to hold your training is a real issue. For liability concerns, most ranges won't allow any other instructors to teach / coach there, except the one(s) that are affiliated with the range and vetted by the range's owners. Usually those instructors are part of the range staff-- actual employees. Sometimes not.

    I don't know about the public's interest in learning to shoot with BB and pellet guns, AirSoft guns, and laser pistols, but those kinds of guns can be very useful for training, even at pretty high skill levels (not every firearm-handling skill can be practiced, of course. Not recoil management, nor rapid magazine swaps for many airguns).

    Setting up a non-firearm range should require less cost, less space, and it's probably easier to get approval of the building inspector.

    I think some newbies, especially women, and parents of kids who would like to send their teenagers to a class about gun safety and basic marksmanship, would feel more comfortable doing an "airgun only" course first, before progressing to real firearms.
     
  8. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

    3,253
    521
    113
    Basic marksmanship training can be done in either your home or the students home.

    IFyou have the right equipment. I use this in the classroom portion as the base before live fire training. My laser will not only fit the blue gun but all of my firearms except the .50AE Desert Eagle. A laser reactive target is also needed for feedback so they can see how they are doing and you can make adjustments before going out to live fire. Stuff isn't cheap.

    Everything Gunsmoker said is true. I would like to add a well drafted waiver is also required. A lawyer well experienced in Georgia Tort law is needed with or without the LLC. Firearms have a tendency to be dangerous when used improperly and new shooters can find a way mishandle them very easily. This is what makes the classroom portion so important. If you are training someone and they injure them self or someone else YOU are the key. This applies with or without charging someone for instruction in firearms. Something a most people don't understand when they take a friend or coworker to the range to show them how to shoot. Even with the waiver a firearm negative judge could allow it to be pierced to get in your pocket.

    Like any other business this is not cheap to set up.
    Electronics (TV or projector and screen, laptop, printer and ink/toner)
    Firearms (Semi Auto, double action Revolver, Single action Revolver, Blue Gun)
    Adaptive laser and reactive target
    Class room rental (if you plan to use a location outside your home for the class room portion)
    Lawyer
    INSURANCE!!!!! (at least $1,000,000 in general liability. $5,000,000 recommended)
    Student materials (books, videos, handouts, training targets, school supplies)
    Are just the top of the list of things you need.
     
  9. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

    27,535
    680
    113
    Also, if you do a non-firearm training program with airguns or laser guns, you might be able to get a significant business from parents of children wanting to send their kids to your classes,

    and possibly private schools and child-care centers doing "field trips" to your facility to have a day at the range. Such private schools already send their kids on field trips to other places where kids could get hurt, like water parks (kids have been known to drown there, or slip and fall), and equestrian centers (danger of falling off a horse, or having one bite or kick you).
     
  10. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

    3,253
    521
    113
    First item on your list of things you need to do is find a range that will allow you to teach. Most ranges already have training programs available and are reluctant to allow outsiders.

    Next get your training materials together. With the old NRA course we had a PPT to use in the classroom. With the new "blended" course a PPT is not available. I am lucky in this area because I am fairly proficient in Power Point and developed my own for the Phase 2. The PPT can cut your time spent in the classroom by about half an hour.

    Once you have done all of this post your schedule in the instructors portal.

    If I was just now doing a start up I would wait until after Christmas to schedule classes. Spend this time putting your course together and practicing to get the raw timing down. This is so you will know about how long the class will take to to teach. If you are teaching the classroom portion in your home and traveling to a range then run through the class portion, take a trip to the range, Run through the live fire portion like you are a new shooter (train yourself), go home and finalize the course. Include gun cleaning, paperwork and all. However long it takes add about 45 minutes. Keep in mind your students will not have had the advantage of asking the "stupid" questions during the Phase 1 like they could in the old course.
     
  11. Scott 40s&w

    Scott 40s&w Member

    693
    4
    18
    Get you place to shoot first. Then get more training NRA Pistol Instructor is just the first step in being an Instructor. With just insurance and business fees you are looking at $500 + a year. Today there are shooting instructors everywhere ( good and bad) it seems like every other veteran wants to run firearms training. When I started there were very few instructors available now there are so many the prices are driven down and students are very hard to get. Good luck