Georgiapacking.org banner

21 - 40 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Ammo is the cheapest in town for me (that I know of). If I'm going for food though, I'll go to the Commissary on base.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,531 Posts
Pretty much all i buy at WallyWorld is groceries (cheaper), and name-brand items (Haynes T-shirts, Wrangler Jeans, etc.).

Or if I need some paper plates for a party.

Big ticket items? Not usually.

Won't ever buy a computer there.

I usually stop there on my way home from work at 7am. No crowds.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
68,080 Posts
Fayetteville just moved their ammo. I thought maybe they quit selling it, but, no, they displayed it so that it is much easier to find what you want to buy and see at a glance what was in stock (they formerly were hiding it under the counter).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
Just bought 100 rnds of Winchester .40 cal 165 gr. jacketed target rounds for $9.90 per box at Walmart. If there's a better price out there somewhere, I haven't found it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,262 Posts
Which Walmart??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
Bought them on Mansell Rd between 400 and Rt.9 in Roswell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Here, here!

ICP_Juggalo said:
The only qualms I have with Wal-Mart is when they try to use the power of government and eminent domain abuse to acquire land to build one of their stores.
+1. That's essentially why I pulled most of my business from them, too. About the only thing I buy there now is ammo and targets.

larryg2 said:
Bought them on Mansell Rd between 400 and Rt.9 in Roswell.
Sounds like we share some of the same stomping grounds. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,798 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
larryg2 said:
Just bought 100 rnds of Winchester .40 cal 165 gr. jacketed target rounds for $9.90 per box at Walmart.
What?! it is like 16 something here for a box of 100 .40!

I'm getting ripped off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
WAIT A MINUTE......HOLD THE HORSES!!!!! It was $19.90 for 100 rds....NOT $9.90.

Sorry, folks.....senility is a terrible thing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,798 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
oh man....I was gonna have to make a trip to your Wal*Mart to pick up some ammo. But $19.....man...that's steep!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
I buy groceries and other household items from Wal-Mart. I also buy WWB ammo there as well. It is only 5 miles from my home so it is convient. I guess the thing I like the least is some of the numbskulls that shop there. Folks that just stand in the isles and make no attempt to be courteous and MOVE!
 

·
Atlanta Overwatch
Joined
·
13,725 Posts
Rammstein said:
oh man....I was gonna have to make a trip to your Wal*Mart to pick up some ammo. But $19.....man...that's steep!
I was at the one on Hwy29 in Lilburn durring lunch. $14.88 for WWB 100rnd packs of 9mm. They were out of then though. They were also out of Blazer Brass. I'll have to go to Windward or Cumming tomorrow to get some.
 

·
Atlanta Overwatch
Joined
·
13,725 Posts
glockgirl said:
academy $4.64 per 50 for 9mm still the best deal around....
I'll agree with that, but by the time I drive from Cumming to Athens and back, I'll spend more that my savings in gas. Unless, I stock up and get a thousand rounds or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
Glockgirl,

Could you please give the full name and location of "academy" in Athens? I have friends there who can pick up & deliver for me.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
ICP_Juggalo said:
The only qualms I have with Wal-Mart is when they try to use the power of government and eminent domain abuse to acquire land to build one of their stores.
Don't efforts like that typically get fronted by an elected representative? Why are we not blaming them? I don't blame Dell for trying to get tax breaks out of North Carolina, and I don't blame GA Power for using eminent domain to ensure my power goes out less frequently than in the Phillippines..

I find it offensive that Kroger, Publix, etc., package deodorant in what appears to be a normal sized package, but it contains 1.7 ounces compared to the 3.2 oz you get at walmart for the same price. I find it offensive they want to track my shopping habits in order to buy goods at only moderately inflated prices. Err, they're tracking the habits of "George Patton, 3 Armor Division Way."

Walmart rocks. Do I leisurely mosey in there at 11am on a Sunday? No, but I bet you guys try to avoid certain roads at certain times of day, too.

Pull up a chair:
Penn and Teller, so there are bad words and a few seconds of nudity at the end, so NSFW.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
68,080 Posts
Walmart Stops Firearms Sales To Those In NeedImagine your firearms were destroyed or stolen by looters
http://www.boston.com/
By Sasha Talcott, Globe Staff | September 11, 2005

BATON ROUGE, La. -- As fearful residents rush to stock up on guns, Wal-Mart, one of the region's biggest suppliers, abruptly stopped selling them at 40 stores scattered throughout the Gulf Coast.

The move infuriated some Wal-Mart customers in this fiercely progun region, some of whom said the big chain left them without protection as the violence increased after Hurricane Katrina.

''We had a lot of chaos," said Donald Goff, who was sitting in a white pickup outside a local Wal-Mart store. ''They should be open to sell guns. They should not be doing this to people."

Smaller stores are eagerly filling the void. Spillway Sportsman, near Baton Rouge, sold 172 guns in one three-day period after the hurricane, when normally it might sell 15. One mother came in to buy her first gun after she and her two children, ages 9 and 12, witnessed a slaying on the streets of New Orleans, said Scott Roe, Spillway's owner.

''Her comment was, 'I was a card-carrying, antigun liberal -- not anymore,' " Roe said. ''She said, 'I'm going back home, and I am not going back unarmed.' "

A Wal-Mart spokeswoman, Karen Burk, attributed the company's decision to pull guns from the shelves to ''some very fluid circumstances and changing situations" in the region. She did not elaborate far beyond that. ''We're trying to take care of our customers and community and be a responsible retailer at the same time," Burk said.

In addition to its decision to stop gun sales at 40 stores, Wal-Mart also has placed severe restrictions on gun sales at some other stores in the area. Executives ordered the guns removed from their glass display cases and put into a vault instead. At those stores, customers who want to purchase a gun must select it through a catalog.

Burk said the retailer has no date set to return guns to the stores.

Wal-Mart's decision to stop gun sales also earned it praise from several customers, who said police would protect them from any trouble.

''Why can't we get along? This is a time of crisis," said Mike White of Kenner, La. He said people who need guns for legitimate reasons, such as hunting, would not be buying now.

Gun sales have become a hot-button issue for Wal-Mart, the nation's largest retailer. Filmmaker Michael Moore blasted the store's gun sales in his documentary ''Bowling for Columbine." In January, the company agreed to pay $14.5 million to settle a lawsuit filed by California's attorney general that accused it of violating state gun laws.

But in post-Katrina Louisiana, a lot of anger erupted when the retailer took guns off its shelves.

Isiah Smith said looters stole cars in his neighborhood and broke into homes as he fled from Laplace to Baton Rouge to escape the storm.

He said Wal-Mart should not have stopped gun sales. ''People have to protect themselves," he said.
© Copyright 2005 Globe Newspaper Company.

Fearful Southerners buy firearms at torrid pace
BY LISA ANDERSON, MICHAEL MARTINEZ AND RAY QUINTANILLA
Chicago Tribune

BATON ROUGE, La. - (KRT) - Gun sales across the South have been booming since the first reports surfaced of armed looters roaming the streets of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. And images of shots being fired at relief workers only elevated fears in some communities.

Now, as hundreds of thousands of people displaced from their homes are being resettled, gun store owners say they're being flooded by a demand for guns - particularly in southern states and others where many of the hurricane victims are being relocated.

Mostly, they say, the demand for guns is being fueled by "good people" wanting to protect their families and properties. That includes people who might not otherwise purchase such weapons, they add.

Frank Pirie says his Baton Rouge store, Bowie Outfitters, is being inundated by a demand for handguns and shotguns in the storm's aftermath. "It's probably as many as we'd sell in almost a year," he said.

On Wednesday morning, he sold handguns to three nurses who were working in downtown New Orleans. Pirie also gave them shooting lessons, he added.

The nurses told Pirie they were "going back into a war zone," he said. "They weren't going back without protection."

But sales are particularly brisk among men and women in Baton Rouge where residents are growing concerned about a wave of newcomers into their community - most of whom arrive with little more than the clothes on their back.

"They're saying this is racist, Ma'am, but that's not true," said Pirie, adding that in recent days he has sold guns to both white and black residents.

"People are just nervous. There is a certain element that was down in New Orleans that has been displaced." Among the good people, he and others fear, is a criminal element, that includes drug dealers who have lost their jobs and people who steal for a living, he explained.

The FBI, which conducts the criminal background checks on those wanting to buy guns, says it's too early to tell whether there's a surge in gun sales taking place in Louisiana or anyplace else. But, they acknowledge, there's no shortage of homeowners putting up signs that read "Looters will be shot on sight."

On the ground, there's mounting evidence to suggest firearms are a hot commodity.

Take the neighborhood surrounding the Astrodome in Houston, where gun stores say they're selling firearms at a brisk pace. "Basically, what we are seeing is people who are just afraid," explained Valde Garcia, manager of Bailey's House of Guns, located five blocks from the Astrodome where thousands of Katrina victims are being temporarily housed.

Fear has sparked a demand for firearms among those who might not otherwise want guns, said Garcia, adding that he has sold a dozen guns - mostly handguns - to Houston homeowners who didn't know what else to do to ease their fears.

"What we offer is a way for people to protect themselves," he said. "Keep in mind nobody knows who these folks coming into the community are."

Of the dozen guns sold within a few hours on Wednesday, most were 38 caliber revolvers.

In Mobile, at the southern Alabama chain of seven pawn shops called Eddie's Wholesale Jewelry, gun sales are up 30 percent in the wake of Katrina because area residents say they want protection from "looters and gang members" who are arriving from New Orleans, according to a chain owner and store clerks.

"Things are crazy," said Josh Collins, 25, a clerk at the Eddie's in the Critchon neighborhood of Mobile. "It's just people in time of need. It's just people - they're just trying to fend for themselves and their family.

"There's a lot of gang people from New Orleans. Didn't you hear they're shooting at police (in New Orleans)? The people are coming here. You've just got to be ready, you know," Collins said.

A favorite handgun is the .38, sold mostly to women, Collins said. The gun takes five rounds and it's easy to load and costs less than $300, he explained.

"It's just for protection. People are trying to steal everything," Collins said, referring to an article in his hometown newspaper featuring a 64-year-old man who wanted to take his wife to Gainesville, Fla., to have cancer surgery. But thieves siphoned his gasoline, and he didn't have the money to buy any gas.

The hot topic of conversation in Eddie's pawnshop this week was the race issue - whether the images of black looters in New Orleans was unfairly casting evacuees from New Orleans as potential criminals carrying a crime wave into their newly adopted communities.

An owner of the Eddie's pawn and gun shop chain, Sandra Gillespie, 45, who is white, struck up a conversation with a customer, Henrietta Brown, 51, who is black, when she entered the pawn shop to cash a check. About 55 to 60 percent of handgun buyers at the pawn shop are African-American, according to Gillespie and Collins.

"Let me ask you if it's a race issue," Gillespie asked Brown as she walked into the shop.

"No," Brown replied. "They say people are coming over here (from New Orleans) and beating people. I'm scared. It's just a bunch of sorry ... thugs.

"It's mixed," Brown added. "No, it ain't all black. Don't put it on that," Brown told a reporter visiting the shop.

Brown, a van driver at a child daycare facility call Kidds Klub Academy, said she already owns a handgun.

"I got it. I'm ready," Brown said. "I'm trying to be nice but if they come over, it's pow-pow," she said, gesturing as if she were holding a shotgun.

One 20-year-old African-American man, who declined to give his name, walked into a Mobile pawn shop and asked to look at a 9 mm and a Glock handgun. The man said he believed five evacuees from New Orleans were trying to take over portions of a public housing project and waved handguns at him and his friends.

"They came up and we said, `What up? What do you need?' They said everybody clear out, we're going to take over. And we said, `What you say, brother? If you want it, you're going to have to take it,'" the 20-year-old man said.

A scuffle ensued, according to the man, who added that he and more than a dozen friends overpowered the group from New Orleans.

Larry Anderson, who has run the largest gun store in central Florida for more than 15 years, said he's not surprised by the surge in gun sales across Louisiana and other parts of the South in the last few days.

"Whenever people feel their way of life is being threatened, they are going to go out and buy guns for protection," said Anderson, whose store carries an inventory of about 1,500 firearms - one of the largest gun stores in Florida.

"It happened during 9-11 and it happens just about every time there's a hurricane on the way in Florida, too."

When last year's hurricane season was over, he explained, gun stores reported sales increases of between 20 and 25 percent. That's a banner year by any measure, he said.

"People want to protect what they have because they've worked hard for it," Anderson, 50, said.

(Anderson reported from Baton Rouge; Martinez reported from Mobile, Ala.; and Ray Quintanilla reported from Chicago.)
2005, Chicago Tribune.
Visit the Chicago Tribune on the Internet at http://www.chicagotribune.com
Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Information Services.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,624 Posts
I grew up one town over from Baton Rouge. My sister lives there, as do a lot of friends, and my father in Amite. They all told of things that happened that the news wouldn't even report. Imagine 3 huge prisons releasing the most evil of criminals into your city. That's pretty much what it was like.
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
Top