Georgia Firearm Forums - Georgia Packing banner

1 - 20 of 98 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From Roanoke.com ... Roanoke Times Jan. 31, 2006

Gun bill gets shot down by panel
HB 1572, which would have allowed handguns on college campuses, died in subcommittee.

By Greg Esposito
381-1675

A bill that would have given college students and employees the right to carry handguns on campus died with nary a shot being fired in the General Assembly.

House Bill 1572 didn't get through the House Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety. It died Monday in the subcommittee stage, the first of several hurdles bills must overcome before becoming laws.

The bill was proposed by Del. Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah County, on behalf of the Virginia Citizens Defense League. Gilbert was unavailable Monday and spokesman Gary Frink would not comment on the bill's defeat other than to say the issue was dead for this General Assembly session.

Virginia Tech spokesman Larry Hincker was happy to hear the bill was defeated. "I'm sure the university community is appreciative of the General Assembly's actions because this will help parents, students, faculty and visitors feel safe on our campus."

Del. Dave Nutter, R-Christiansburg, would not comment Monday because he was not part of the subcommittee that discussed the bill.

Most universities in Virginia require students and employees, other than police, to check their guns with police or campus security upon entering campus. The legislation was designed to prohibit public universities from making "rules or regulations limiting or abridging the ability of a student who possesses a valid concealed handgun permit ... from lawfully carrying a concealed handgun."

The legislation allowed for exceptions for participants in athletic events, storage of guns in residence halls and military training programs.

Last spring a Virginia Tech student was disciplined for bringing a handgun to class, despite having a concealed handgun permit. Some gun owners questioned the university's authority, while the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police came out against the presence of guns on campus.

In June, Tech's governing board approved a violence prevention policy reiterating its ban on students or employees carrying guns and prohibiting visitors from bringing them into campus facilities.


A little more than a year later

1 Killed in Shootings at Virginia Tech
Apr 16 12:05 PM US/Eastern
By SUE LINDSEY
Associated Press Writer

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) - Gunfire erupted in a dorm and classroom at Virginia Tech on Monday, killing at least one person and wounding 17, authorities said.

The university told students to stay inside and away from windows as police swept the campus and worked to establish whether the gunman acted alone.

A hospital spokeswoman said 17 students were treated for gunshot wounds and other injuries.

On the Web site, Tech reported the shootings at opposite ends of the 2,600-acre campus at West Ambler Johnston, a co-ed residence hall that houses 895 people, and said there were "multiple victims" at Norris Hall, an engineering building.

Government officials with knowledge of the case told The Associated Press there were seven to eight other "casualties."

All entrances to the campus were closed and classes canceled through Tuesday.

"There's just a lot of commotion. It's hard to tell exactly what's going on," said student Jason Anthony Smith, 19, who lives in the dorm where shooting took place.

Aimee Kanode, a freshman from Martinsville, said the shooting happened on the 4th floor of West Ambler Johnston dormitory, one floor above her room. Kanode's resident assistant knocked on her door about 8 a.m. to notify students to stay put.

"They had us under lockdown," Kanode said. "They temporarily lifted the lockdown, the gunman shot again."

"We're all locked in our dorms surfing the Internet trying to figure out what's going on," Kanode said.

Madison Van Duyne, a student who was interviewed by telephone on CNN, said, "We are all in lockdown. Most of the students are sitting on the floors away from the windows just trying to be as safe as possible."

It was second time in less than a year that the campus was closed because of a shooting.

In August 2006, the opening day of classes was canceled and the campus closed when an escaped jail inmate allegedly killed a hospital guard off campus and fled to the Tech area. A sheriff's deputy involved in the manhunt was killed on a trail just off campus.

The accused gunman, William Morva, faces capital murder charges.
When will the Government learn that the only people disarmed by thier laws are the law abiding. By requiring the victims to be disarmed victims, Virginia is as guilty as the murderer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
I'm sure the university's response would be something like "imagine how much worse it could be if people were emboldened HB1572". :roll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
BTW FoxNews.com says at least 21 people were killed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Dang shame that those 21 dead weren't allowed to carry to defend themselves..>Ya know darn well the campus police can't protect them.. :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
FoxNews.com is claiming that there were shootings at opposite ends of the campus: one between 7:15 & 7:30 and the other at 10:00. The police are saying that they do not believe them to be related. :shock:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,266310,00.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Mike from Philly,

The error described below has been corrected and was apparently an honest error.

You claim this law was blocked today, that's wrong and you know it. The law failed in January 2006, not TODAY

"From Roanoke.com ... Roanoke Times 4/16/07 (TODAY) "

You selectively cut and paste the story, omitting the January 31, 2006 dateline. The truth is the law failed in 2006, not today. It's a tragedy either way, and this law might have saved lives.

However, lying just to get more impact for your posting and to exploit today's tragedy, only discredits people with legitimate valid concerns about the protection of our rights.

The link to the story you claimed was printed today is here:

http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/wb/xp-50658
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Well, thankfully this didn't actually happen because we all know that gun-free school zones prevent people from bringing guns onto campus.

I wonder how long it will take politicians/antis to publicly thank the fact that the gun bill allowing guns on campus failed?

I hope all the antis feel real good about their side right now. My heart goes out to the victims. Hopefully the gunmen will be caught and dismembered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,215 Posts
UPDATE: FOX NEWS IS SAYING IT WAS ONLY ONE GUNMAN AND HE IS DEAD

Police: At Least 21 Dead After Virginia Tech University Shooting
Monday, April 16, 2007

BLACKSBURG, Va. â€" At least 21 are dead and another 21 are wounded after a shooting at Virginia Tech University Monday morning, police said.

Campus police said there was only one shooter and he is now dead. They are unsure if the shooter was a student and it was unclear if he was shot by police or took his own life.

"Today the university was struck by a tragedy we consider of monumental proportions," Virginia Tech President Charles Steger said during a press conference shortly after noon. "I cannot begin to convey my own personal sense of loss over this senseless, incomprehensible, heinous act."

Steger said school officials are notifying victims' next if kin, and state police and the FBI are still investigating the various crime scenes. They are still trying to identify all the victims. The university will set up counseling centers for students and faculty.

At 7:15 a.m. Monday, a 911 call came in to the campus police department concerning an incident at West Ambler Johnston, a residence hall, and that there were multiple shooting victims, Steger said. While that investigation was underway, a second shooting was reported in Norris Hall, located at the opposite end of the 2,600-acre campus.

Virginia Tech Police Chief Wendell Flinchum said at least one person was killed at West Ambler Johnston, a residence hall, but several others were injured in that shooting. At least 20 were killed in classrooms in Norris Hall, an engineering building, Flinchum said.

Flinchum said the Norris Hall gunman was dead, but wouldn't say whether the shooter killed himself.

A spokeswoman at Montgomery Regional Hospital said 17 students were being treated there for gunshot wounds and other injuries, and Carilion New River Valley Medical Center in Christiansburg reports that four people with gunshot wounds were being treated there. Carilion spokeswoman Sharon Honaker said one was in critical condition and three others were stable.

President Bush was "horrified" of news of shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, said White House spokeswoman Dana Perino. The White House is monitoring the incident.

The school's Web site earlier said one shooter was in custody and officials searched for a second shooter as "part of routine police procedure," but during the press conference Monday, police said they believe there was only one shooter.

Police also said there is no evidence the two shootings at opposite ends of campus were related.

Virginia Tech student Blake Harrison said he was on his way to class near Norris Hall when he saw chaos.

"This teacher comes flying out of Norris, he's bleeding from his arm or his shoulder ... all these students were coming out of Norris trying to take shelter in Randolph [Hall]. All these kids were freaked out," Harrison said.

The students and faculty were barricading themselves in their classrooms after what one person described as an Asian student wearing a vest opened fire.

The shooter was "wearing a vest covered in clips was just unloading on their door, going from classroom to classroom … they said it never seemed like it was going to stop and there was just blood all over," Harrison said.

Matt Merone, a campus senior, was on his way to campus Monday morning when he saw a police officer grab a male student who was bleeding from his stomach area and put him into a vehicle, which whisked him away. He told FOX News that his roommate saw the first shooting.

Student Amanda Johnson was walking between Norris and Randolph halls around 9:45 a.m. when she heard six shots fired.

"I've been target shooting since I was a little kid so I knew what the sounds were," said Johnson, who saw a male student jump out of a Norris Hall window to escape. She and others helped him get into a car.

The FBI joined police on the scene to investigate.

All classes have been canceled and students and most faculty have been told to stay inside. Tuesday classes have also been canceled but the campus will open at 8 a.m. EDT. Faculty and staff on the Burruss Hall side of the campus drillfield are being released and asked to go home effective immediately. Faculty and staff on the War Memorial Hall side of the drillfield are asked to leave at 12:30 p.m.

The campus newspaper also reported that because of serious wind, helicopters cannot be used to transfer the injured. Ambulances are apparently being used to transport the victims to Montgomery Regional Hospital.

"There are police driving throughout the neighborhoods with a loudspeaker saying, 'this is an emergency, everyone stay inside, we're looking for suspicious activity," Brittany Sammon, a senior Virginia Tech student staying at an apartment off campus, told FOX News on Monday. "There's no one outside at all, there's no traffic, there's nothing … everyone's doing what they said."

Sammon, who has a brother and roommate confined to their buildings on campus, said she first got the e-mail from the school regarding the shooting at 9:30 a.m. Monday.

"It was just very short and brief and kind of scary, because it didn't have any details at all in it," she said. "It's definitely nerve wracking."

Anyone who observes anything suspicious or has information about this case is encouraged to contact the Virginia Tech Police at (540) 231-6411.

The West Ambler Johnston dorm, commonly known on campus as West AJ, houses about 895 students and is located near West End Market and Dietrick Dining Center.

Virginia Tech has the largest full-time student population in Virginia, with more than 25,000 students. It consists of eight colleges and graduate school and offers 60 bachelor's degree programs and 140 master's and doctoral degree programs.

The main campus includes more than 100 buildings located on 2,600 acres, and includes an airport.

Last August, the campus was closed when an escaped jail inmate allegedly killed a hospital guard and a sheriff's deputy involved in a massive manhunt. The accused gunman, William Morva, faces capital murder charges.

On April 13, the campus closed three of its academic halls after they received a letter stating that explosive devices were in the building. Classes were canceled for the remainder of the day. A bomb threat was also made against Torgerson Hall on April 2.

"For some reason, this just seemed a little different … it was more than just a sick joke someone was playing," one student told FOX News about those bomb threats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Re: Mike from Philly, twisting the facts doesn't help the ca

TruthMatters said:
You claim this law was blocked today, that's wrong and you know it. The law failed in January 2006, not TODAY

"From Roanoke.com ... Roanoke Times 4/16/07 (TODAY) "

You selectively cut and paste the story, omitting the January 31, 2006 dateline. The truth is the law failed in 2006, not today. It's a tragedy either way, and this law might have saved lives.

However, lying just to get more impact for your posting and to exploit today's tragedy, only discredits people with legitimate valid concerns about the protection of our rights.

The link to the story you claimed was printed today is here:

http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/wb/xp-50658
Hi Larry! Hope you are well.

I purposely stayed out of the AR15 conversation in light of our past history and your MO of criticizing folks but never bringing information to the table. I like sitting in judgement as well but that game doesn't move the ball forward.

Someday, we will meet in person. You'll find me very honorable and truthful. Then, you will regret the comments you made. How do I know this? I've called others names and accused them of unspeakable horrors also and have regreted it when I met them or learned their perspective.

Anyhow .... I've corrected the date. If you look at the Roanoke banner you'll see today's date on the left side in white just below Roanoke.com I didn't notice the 1/31/06 in fine print on the right. My bad.

I should say, I do appreciate you fact checking us. Your efforts will benefit us since it will improve our "product" and sharpen our facts. I hope you continue doing so.

No hard feelings,

Mike M.

PS I researched the links to slavery and Jim Crow and wrote the articles on the GCO site. If in the unlikely event you find errors in those, please feel free to offer critcism and corrections.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
68,974 Posts
Man, this is terrible.

Anyway
"I've been target shooting since I was a little kid so I knew what the sounds were," said Johnson, who saw a male student jump out of a Norris Hall window to escape. She and others helped him get into a car.
People should not be reduced to having to jump out of windows to escape because they are disarmed by law.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Nope, not Larry

Not sure what you two have discussed in the past, might make for some interesting reading.

i'm a newbie to the site, directed here because of the "irony" of the law supposedly failing on the same day as the shooting.

I did notice the correction to the dateline and appreciate your acknowledging the error.

It sucks the law didn't pass when they had the chance back in 2006. How many people would still be alive today?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
68,974 Posts
Maybe 21 people, maybe less. Maybe somebody. A lot of people, as we know, will choose not to carry anyway, and most college students cannot (assuming you must be 21 yoa to carry in Virginia, I do not know), but at least there is a chance for somebody to be armed and defend themselves or others without a gun ban.

We see the results of the gun ban.

Unfortunately, the people who proposed the gun ban will be arguing that what is needed is stronger gun bans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Re: Nope, not Larry

TruthMatters said:
How many people would still be alive today?
Drudge is indicating the toll is 31 and rising. So at least 31.

This is my worst fear for my daughter ... being defenseless waiting for the inevitable. Too many of relatives went that way in the Holocaust.

Gun control killed those kids. Compare the toll at Trolley Square vs here. 1 gun & 8 rounds can make a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,981 Posts
Maybe some anti's might understand why unarming lawfully abiding citizens is coming to a head now. More and more these stories are popping up. And they are popping up more in OFF LIMIT areas! Criminals are stupid but they arent deaf. The media tells them where, they carry out their horror.

I doubt all of the antis will understand the importance of allowing "adults" even in college, that qualify, the rights any other adult has off college property. This all could have been avoided if at least one person in 22 had a firearm to help protect fellow classmates. I know I would help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A college age student can get married, have sex, vote, join the military, sign contracts, drive a car, pay taxes, etc. and yet they can't be trusted with a firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Virginia Tech's ban on guns may draw legal fire
Some people question whether the university has the authority to ban the carrying of firearms. How about you?

By Kevin Miller
381-1676

BLACKSBURG - Virginia Tech's recent action against a student caught carrying a gun to class could draw unwanted attention from groups already angry about firearms restrictions on public college campuses.

University officials confirmed that, earlier this semester, campus police approached a student found to be carrying a concealed handgun to class. The unnamed student was not charged with any crimes because he holds a state-issued permit allowing him to carry a concealed gun. But the student could face disciplinary action from the university for violating its policy prohibiting "unauthorized possession, storage or control" of firearms on campus.

Tech spokesman Larry Hincker declined to release the student's name or specifics of the incident, citing rules protecting student confidentiality. But Hincker said Tech's ban on guns dates back several decades.

Students who violate the school policy could be called before the university's internal judicial affairs system, which has wide discretion in handing down penalties ranging from a reprimand to expulsion.

"I think it's fair to say that we believe guns don't belong in the classroom," Hincker said. "In an academic environment, we believe you should be free from fear."

Most public colleges in Virginia ban or restrict guns on campus. But the root of that authority is murky, according to some observers.

Virginia law already prohibits students or visitors from carrying guns onto the grounds of public and private K-12 schools. The state also prohibits concealed weapons in courthouses, places of worship during a service, jails and on any private property where the owner has posted a "no guns" notice. State employees are barred from possessing guns while at work unless needed for their job.

But Virginia code is silent on guns and public colleges. And two bills seeking to give college governing boards the authority to regulate firearms on campus died in committee during this year's General Assembly session.

David Briggman, a resident of Keezletown in Rockingham County, has made it his personal mission to challenge state colleges' authority to enact tougher gun restrictions than the state.

Briggman, who is a former police officer, said he forced Blue Ridge Community College to allow him to carry a gun onto campus while a student. And he sued James Madison University over its ban on concealed weapons even among permit holders. While JMU's policy still stands, Briggman said he has been told by campus police officials that they will not arrest visitors who carry a gun legally.

"It's extremely easy to challenge university policy by looking at ... whether they are given the statutory authority to regulate firearms on campus, and of course, they're not," Briggman said Tuesday.

Hincker, meanwhile, said it is not unusual for colleges to have more restrictive policies than the state. As an example, Hincker said certain chemicals and explosives that are legal on the outside are prohibited in the classroom or in dormitories for safety reasons.

"We think we have the right to adhere to and enforce that policy because, in the end, we think it's a common-sense policy for the protection of students, staff and faculty as well as guests and visitors," Hincker said.

Virginia Tech also has the backing of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police. In a policy position paper dated April 1, association executive director Dana Schrad wrote that the presence of guns on college campuses "adds a dangerous element to an environment in which alcohol is a compounding factor." Students should not have to be concerned about guns on campus, Schrad wrote.

"The excellent reputation of Virginia's colleges and universities depends in part on the public's belief that they are sending their college-age children to safe environments," the policy paper reads.

At least one attorney who represents college students would like to see the concealed-carry permit issue clarified.

John Robertson, the Student Legal Services attorney at Tech, said he's heard differing interpretations of the policy at Tech. Robertson, whose position is funded through the Student Government Association's budget, does not represent students in disputes with the university but offers free legal advice and services to students on civil and criminal matters.

Robertson said he would like to see either a court or the state Attorney General's Office resolve the matter. As for a university's refusal to honor a concealed-carry permit, Robertson added: "I am dubious that one particular arm of the state can do so without a particular statute."

Hincker acknowledged that the concealed guns issue had "never been tested" and that the university could be opening itself up to legal action.

"But we stand by the policy unequivocally," Hincker said.
 
1 - 20 of 98 Posts
Top