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mountainpass said:
Fulton's Revolving door
“The problem is that the sentence he received is typical of the sentences that are handed out in the [rocket docket] system which now handles 70 percent of the cases in Fulton County and is presided over by an non-elected magistrate instead of an elected Superior Court judge," Howard said. "The magistrates ... put them on probation."
[quote:vzwn6ycf]Online federal court records show that a Gregory Favors was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Atlanta on July 21, 2000, to 62 months in prison for firearms violations. Howard believes it was the same man.
Page Pate, an Atlanta defense lawyer, said what was most telling about Favors state criminal record was the probation he received for another gun charge in March 2009 in Fulton Superior Court. He said the gun law, which has a five-year minimum sentence, was established to ensure felons who were arrested with a firearm went to prison.
More nonsense at the link.[/quote:vzwn6ycf]

(The above was taken from the Trooper LeCroy thread)

Reference the vigilante justice thread

Many cities have a revolving door problem. A lot of folks see this as government (justice department) not doing its job. Folks in Skidmore, MO felt that government (justice department) didn't do its job. We know how that ended, and many felt it was justified.

In the vigilante thread, GooberTim pointed out:
GooberTim said:
In our society, law resides in the hands of the people. We hire city and county officials, law enforcement officers, judges and prosecutors (among others) to make sure individuals live within the law, prosecuting and punishing those who don't. When this system fails to effectively protect the citizenry, what do we do?
Groats followed with:
groats said:
So it's wrong for a community to dispense justice, unless they hire a person to do it for them and give him a nice tin badge to pin on?

If their employees (judges and police officers) are unwilling or unable to perform their duties, what options are left?
At what point (if at all) is it acceptable for the people to uphold (or enforce) the law themselves? If hired officials aren't doing their job, can the people do the job themselves in the interim?
 

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AV8R said:
At what point (if at all) is it acceptable for the people to uphold (or enforce) the law themselves? If hired officials aren't doing their job, can the people do the job themselves in the interim?
Acceptable for the last few hundred years, at least.

If, for example, the sheriff doesn't have the manpower to go after some criminals, he could (still can, I guess) deputize ordinary citizens to do the job.

If the sheriff isn't doing his job, a judge could deputize citizens to enforce the law (and run the sheriff out of town).

This deputizing does nothing to make the deputies more qualified, it's just a CYA move.
 
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