USMC goes suppressed

Discussion in 'In the News' started by UtiPossidetis, May 13, 2017.

  1. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    http://www.military.com/daily-news/...loy-rifle-suppressors.html?ESRC=todayinmil.sm

    Following a series of trials testing the feasibility of an infantry battalion equipped entirely with suppressors, the United States Marine Corps has moved quickly to field the first all-suppressed unit to the Værnes Air Station garrison in Stjørdal, Norway. This deployment, and more importantly its overwhelmingly positive reception, appear to signal the beginning of the end for unsuppressed infantry weapons in the West.
     
  2. Feral

    Feral Active Member

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    Good luck getting suppressors legalized now that they're going to be considered "Weapons of war."

     

  3. phaed

    phaed Active Member

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    i think we've discussed this before here. there are some issues with doing this. to reiterate, suppressors heat up very quickly ( i think it's around 7 deg F every shot, iirc). this will be an issue in a prolonged firefight, because they'll melt, and be a challenge to remove or swap. they also add length and weight forward, not necessarily something you want.

    there may be ways to mitigate both of these problems, but i think they'll involve using integrated suppressors in a new, as yet designed weapon platform. AR's aren't really that great for it.
     
  4. Feral

    Feral Active Member

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    Can you elaborate on the heat component?

    I'm not very knowledgeable on suppressors outside of the legalities.

    Is the suppressor melting a genuine concern?
     
  5. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    Extended military use will make for better technology for all of us.
     
  6. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    Guns get rid of heat via 3 main mechanisms. First is the spent casing. It contains a surprising amount of heat energy, so much so that this is the single largest hurdle for adoption of caseless munitions. Second is the gasses vented out of the weapon and third is via convection from the firearm into the surrounding air.

    Suppressors work by using a larger volumes and surface areas than a standard barrel bore to trap (and cool) hot muzzle gasses. The gasses that are eventually vented from suppressors are much cooler and moving at a much lower velocity than those that exit a non-suppressed muzzle. The law of conservation of energy says that extra energy has to go somewhere. In this case it is into the firearm and suppressor.

    With respect to "melting", a suppressor doesn't have to melt like an aluminum can in a campfire for it to become dangerous to all nearby. It just has to deform just a little bit to interrupt the path of a bullet or fail to contain a 5-figure PSI spike for it to become a grenade. Additionally, should enough heat build up in a chamber, ammunition will fire off automatically as the propellant ignites from heat instead of a reaction started by the firing pin.
     
  7. Feral

    Feral Active Member

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    That was quite informative. Thank you.

    Now I'm deep in the hole reading about caseless ammunition. Fascinating stuff.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2017
  8. phaed

    phaed Active Member

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    i remember that old H&K prototype back when Aliens came out...was really neat stuff.
     
  9. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Just the opposite I would think. Arms suitable for military use is exactly what the 2nd Amendment protects!