TX Gov: says licensees should be free to take them anywhere

Discussion in 'National Laws, Bills and Politics' started by lsu_nonleg, May 1, 2007.

  1. lsu_nonleg

    lsu_nonleg New Member

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    Perry: Banning pistols isn't the answer
    Governor says licensees should be free to take them anywhere for protection

    By CLAY ROBISON
    Copyright 2007 Houston Chronicle Austin Bureau


    AUSTIN — Gov. Rick Perry said Monday that Texans who are legally licensed should be able to carry their concealed handguns anywhere, including churches, bars, courthouses and college campuses.

    "I think it makes sense for Texans to be able to protect themselves from deranged individuals, whether they're in church, or whether on a college campus or wherever they are," he said.

    "The idea that you're going to exempt them from a particular place is nonsense to me."

    Perry commented to reporters after he and U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt had met privately with educators, mental health experts and law enforcement officials to discuss the recent shootings at Virginia Tech University. Leavitt and other Cabinet officials are traveling around the country to discuss school and community safety practices in preparation for a report to President Bush.

    The governor's remarks aren't likely to result in widespread changes in Texas gun laws, particularly this late in a legislative session that must adjourn by May 28.

    But the comments elicited sharp responses, and Perry's stance puts him at odds with a major political ally, the Texas Association of Business, over the right of employers to continue to ban firearms from their property.

    "We're not in the Wild West anymore," Tommie Garza of Houston, executive director of Texans for Gun Safety, said of the governor's idea. "It doesn't seem like the sensible thing to do."

    Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson, who sponsored the concealed handgun law as a state senator in 1995, said he agreed with Perry that "we need more guns in schools in the hands of responsible people."

    But he drew the line at allowing guns in bars. "People get drunk there, and their aim is not as good," he said.

    Current law prohibits the carrying of firearms, even by handgun licensees, into bars, schools, most areas of college campuses and courthouses. Churches can ban them, and governmental bodies can prohibit licensees from carrying pistols into public meetings.

    Companies also can prohibit their employees from carrying weapons onto their property. The Senate has approved a bill to allow handgun licensees to leave their weapons in their cars on company parking lots, but the TAB and many employers are trying to kill that legislation in the House.

    Asked about carrying a pistol into a bar, Perry said, "I think that a person ought to be able to carry that weapon if they are legally licensed to."

    The governor responded less clearly when asked whether Texas should submit mental health information on some individuals to a national database used for background checks.

    Seung-Hui Cho, the shooter who killed 32 people and himself at Virginia Tech on April 16, had purchased two handguns, despite having been declared mentally ill.

    Senate Bill 1755 by Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, which hasn't yet been heard by a Senate committee, would cover people who have received court-ordered inpatient mental health services or who have been declared mentally incapacitated. But it wouldn't apply to people like Cho, who was a mental health outpatient.

    There are privacy requirements under federal law that must be considered, Perry said.

    Austin Bureau reporter Peggy Fikac contributed to this story.

    clay.robison@chron.com
     
  2. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    Maybe bars are going too far, but I have to agree with the guy. After the VT shooting, I think we're going to see more politicans come out in favor of allowing licensed persons to carry pretty much everywhere. Whith should be a good thing, as Martha would say...
     

  3. lsu_nonleg

    lsu_nonleg New Member

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    I don't think he's looking to change the "you can't have a BAC that registers and conceal" requirement, just the one banning carry because of the place. I would Soooo be the DD every stinking night for that privilege.
     
  4. glockgirl

    glockgirl New Member

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    well I go to lots of bars and don't drink... I think it should allow carry at bars if you have not been drinking!

    hell I would just be happen to be able to carry at steakhouses and on campus for right now!
     
  5. S&W 40

    S&W 40 Active Member

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    Aim not as good, atleast he knows the truth and not saying they all get hot headed.
     
  6. notamasshole

    notamasshole New Member

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    Carry in a bar should not be a problem. Make it illegal(or keep it illegal) to carry when intoxicated. I go into bars sometimes and don't drink(not in georgia) I have yet to suddenly get violent.
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I called his office to see if he was interested in establishing residency in Georgia and running for office.

    They said no. :cry:
     
  8. jrm

    jrm Sledgehammer

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    Absolutely. Other states allow carry in bars, and they don't seem to have a problem.

    People are allowed to drive their cars to bars. They just must be responsible when they leave.
     
  9. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    Why limit yourself to Georgia? [-X

    Forget running for a GA office!

    Think big MP my man!

    REAL BIG!!!

    We need him, or someone very much like him, running for president!!!!

    Do we really want it coming down to a choice between Hilary or Rudy?


    :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke: :puke:
     
  10. lsu_nonleg

    lsu_nonleg New Member

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    Ok, well let's not overlook that he decided to make the HPV vaccine standard (with usual loopholes, it's the principle of it) for little girls in Texas before the TX Senate shut him down.

    A Senate... acting in the role of advice and consent... Novel concept.

    He's a damn sight better than Sonny or the rest of the GFW RINOs, but I don't trust him when he's not bound by angry Texans.
     
  11. glockgirl

    glockgirl New Member

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    hmmm do you realize every woman that has cervical cancer could have been helped by this vaccine? Honestly you should vaccinate them in elementary school if necessary... If a guy gets this disease it is just embrassing for them... if a woman gets it and develops cervical cancer it can KILL her... and I believe like 50-75% percent of the adult populace has it and many don't know it...Folks need get their heads out of the sand and just face the facts that teens will have sex.

    sorry the the thread jack... I just have had a few friends suffer from cervical cancer and it is no joke.

    you may now return to your regularly scheduled thread.
     
  12. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

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    forced vaccinations? no thank you.
     
  13. glockgirl

    glockgirl New Member

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    there is an out for personal objections... remember small pox would never have been controlled without mandated vaccination. by doing the vaccinations in school it allows all folks to afford it and allows everyone to get them. we already have forced vaccination to enter public schools MMR, TB skin tests,tetnus, menigitis, varicella, polio, etc. The only reason this is a debate is due to the sexual component. I have a huge interest in public health so this tends to be a soapbox of mine.

    the only way to stop a pandemic is thru prevention, quarantine, and treatment.
     
  14. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

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    Point of order, but there is a big difference between a highly infectious disease spread through the air and a STD.
     
  15. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Cervical cancer does not exactly spread the same way as "small pox" or TB - come, on! :roll:

    Nobody is trying to outlaw the vaccine.
     
  16. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, what he said.
     
  17. foshizzle

    foshizzle New Member

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    Ron Paul is pretty close... I'll ask him. Man, can you imagine Ron Paul as your congressman? Seems he would fit right in here in Georgia... I wonder how we got so sorry? Before I moved here I figured Georgia would be a gun-owner/freedom lovers paradise. :cry: We're governed by a bunch of sissies.
     
  18. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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  19. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://www.star-telegram.com/275/story/89464.html

    Hard to argue with Perry's stance on concealed handguns
    By O.K. CARTER
    Star-Telegram Staff Writer


    Just when Gov. Rick Perry looked increasingly like a Bush-lite homeboy, out he comes with an amazing proposal that will make him the guv hero-of-the-year with the National Rifle Association: Texans with concealed-handgun permits should be allowed to carry their pistolas everywhere.

    Advance disclosure of Second Amendment bias: I have a concealed-handgun permit.

    But having a permit is more trouble than it's worth. My employer forbids firearms on the premises. There are highly discouraging signs regarding weaponry at the library and City Hall, plus all kinds of no-nos involving bringing a heater to honky-tonks, schools, courthouses, churches, hospitals and athletic events.

    Perry correctly calculates that people with murder in mind will simply ignore signage and shoot every defenseless person in sight, much as happened at Virginia Tech. The hypothesis is that nothing discourages a mass murderer faster or with greater finality than someone shooting back.

    It's a tough argument to dispute. The 1991 massacre at a Killeen Luby's left 23 people dead, prompting the Legislature to create a concealed-handgun law.

    Evidently quite a few Texans have considered the gun-toting possibility. On average, the Department of Public Safety gets maybe a hundred concealed-handgun applications a week. After the Virginia Tech tragedy, it was running up to 700 a day.

    "I think a person ought to be able to carry their weapons with them anywhere in this state if they are licensed and they have gone through the training," Perry said this week.

    "You go, Rick," says Jack Griffith, a longtime Arlington CPA turned full-time concealed-handgun instructor. Griffith calculates that he's trained 1,500 residents, two battalions' worth of armed citizenry. He's among half a dozen trainers listed in the Arlington Yellow Pages alone. It's a growth industry, with many more individuals certified than most people realize.

    Instruction is a mix of safety procedures, dos and don'ts, a review of relevant legal considerations and firing range practice. License holders are competent, though -- unless they frequent a firing range -- unlikely to have the small-arms skills of police or military personnel. :roll:

    Applicants are fingerprinted and their records are checked against state and national crime databases. In short, they're just the kind of mildly paranoid and cautious people we all hope are around the next time a homicidal nutcase shows up at Luby's midway through the LuAnn special.

    Griffith's classes are a mix of reality and humor. For example, there's the first rule of gunfighting: "Absolutely don't get in a gunfight," Griffith says. "Skedaddle, hide, retreat, take cover, call 911."

    The second rule is to really, really remember the first rule.

    The third rule is that if a gunfight breaks out, the odds of survival are far better for people who bring a gun and know how to use it.

    Of Griffith's 1,500 former students, the number who've landed in legal difficulties is statistically insignificant.

    "Zero, in fact, though I've had a few end up in situations where they had to pull weapons but not fire them," Griffith recollects.

    What happens now? The governor's proposal is only a statement of philosophy. There is no House or Senate bill being considered that would implement his suggestion. Nor is there likely to be. A few bills would marginally expand weapons-carrying rights; others would diminish them.

    For instance, the Arlington school district is lobbying for the reversal of a law that allows a gun to be left in a car parked on school property. Rep. Diane Patrick, R-Arlington, supports the measure, as does Superintendent Mac Bernd. It's still working its way through the House Law Enforcement Committee.

    As for Griffith, he's hopeful but not optimistic that the governor's preferences will take root.

    "These days, smokers and gun owners are about the last people around that can be discriminated against," he said. "I don't expect that to change."

    okc@star-telegram.com
    O.K. Carter's column runs Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday.
     
  20. lsu_nonleg

    lsu_nonleg New Member

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    I think the Dallas Morning News would have a decidedly different lean. Well, that of the AJC :)