Trying to avoid having to appeal

Discussion in 'General GWL Questions' started by olds350, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. olds350

    olds350 New Member

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    Finally my family and I are moving to Georgia. Most likely we will buy a home in Cobb county in May/June.

    I currently live in Illinois and have an Illinois ccw permit. I also have Florida and Utah and had an Arizona ccw permits. Outsid of Utah, I have always gotten initially denied because of Illinois terrible record keeping. I have to present a copy of my disposition that states the judge vacated it.

    Is there a way I could just include the disposition with the initial application to avoid having to appeal?
     
  2. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    You can, but there's no law that says the probate judge has to consider it at that early stage. I'd make it a "certified" copy, though. Stamped by the clerk's office in Illinois and signed or initialed by a staff member.
     

  3. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    And you might want to attach an Illinois law or court ruling that says a "vacated conviction" in that state's legal system means you aren't considered to have been convicted (or it's like you've been pardoned) with no loss of any of your rights.

    Don't expect a Georgia probate judge to know about another state's laws on criminal procedure.
     
  4. olds350

    olds350 New Member

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    Yes I have a signed certified copy.

    Other than my name case number and that I was a minor, below is what it states.

    "DOROTHY BROWN, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County, in and for the State of Illinois, and the
    Keeper ofthe records, files and seal thereof, do hereby certify the above and foregoing to be true, perfect and complete

    The Honorable Michael Stuttley on February 6, 2003 - Motion Vacate Finding on August 8, 2002

    Sustained. Nunc Pro Tunc. Case Dismissed."
     
  5. olds350

    olds350 New Member

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    That is a great idea. Its better than a pardon. The judge basically threw out the entire thing as if it never happened. The problem is Illinois never updated the FBI so it shows the initial charge from 2002 but never shows a disposition.