Truck Cut in Half by Train

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by gunsmoker, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

    27,544
    687
    113
    A FedEx tractor trailer, pulling two trailers, was crossing a railroad track in Salt Lake City, Utah.
    The railroad crossing had the road-blocking arms UP, to the sky, indicating the paved road was safe and no train was coming on the tracks.
    There were no lights, no bells, no warnings of any kind being sounded or flashing.

    So the truck slowly crossed the tracks.

    BOOM !!

    Train cuts that sucker in two, and disintegrates the trailer it hit first.

    IT TURNS OUT that ice and snow had caused a sensor malfunction at this intersection, causing the warning lights to come on and the arms to lower when NO train was coming. So a railroad employee just disabled the safety sensors and locked the arms "up" and disabled the bells and flashing lights.

    :shock:

    And he left it that way.

    Makes sense, no?

    :screwy:

    (NO)



    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXVFo6lUAJg[/ame]

    http://fox13now.com/2017/01/30/uta-...dent-involving-frontrunner-train-fedex-truck/
     
  2. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

    12,826
    830
    113
    That truck was cut into alot more than half by the train.

    Nemo
     

  3. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

    11,494
    601
    113
    Wow, I watched that in slo-mo. Good thing the cab was past the point of impact. The driver probably was not hurt much if at all.
     
  4. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

    1,004
    84
    48
    Regardless of the state of the warning system, the driver shares fault for stopping on top of the tracks. I hope he gets cited too, there's rarely ever a reason to do it.
     
  5. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

    7,958
    42
    48
    The truck appeared to be moving the entire time. At a crawl with icy roads and what not, but still moving.
     
  6. Scout706

    Scout706 Well-Known Member

    3,596
    30
    48
    Stop. look. listen. Remember that?
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

    67,050
    1,428
    113
    2 observations:

    The lights start flashing at 49 seconds, and then the arms come down.

    It appears the police officer saw the train coming and stopped his patrol car.​
     
  8. mog

    mog Active Member

    2,307
    1
    38
    Who here has their CDL? Or stops at every railroad crossing?
     
  9. Scout706

    Scout706 Well-Known Member

    3,596
    30
    48
    Not I, mea culpa.
     
  10. rmodel65

    rmodel65 Yukon Cornelius

    11,632
    44
    48

    I don't have a cdl but te railroad crosses are a yield sign
     
  11. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

    13,613
    158
    63
    It's been a few years since I has my CDL, but unless things have changed, they are only required to stop for rail crossings if carrying passengers for hire or hauling hazmat.
     
  12. Schweisshund

    Schweisshund Well-Known Member

    8,732
    304
    83
    There was a car directly behind the Fed Ex truck that nearly got hit as well. The other Fed Ex truck narrowly avoided getting hit. What I noticed is the car that had the camera in it that filmed the whole thing actually stopped and looked.
     
  13. Suburbbus

    Suburbbus Well-Known Member

    2,091
    35
    48
    I do and I either stop if I cannot see both directions when close or roll slowly if I can see both directions as I approach the tracks.
     
  14. Suburbbus

    Suburbbus Well-Known Member

    2,091
    35
    48
    School buses are required to stop at all r/r crossings whether students on board or not.

    While a school bus driver for Gwinnett County, there were multiple times where after I stopped and did all the stuff you do as a driver, as soon as I released the air brakes and just as I was preparing to cross, the lights came on and crossing gates started down. Luckily, I had not actually started moving in any of the times. Our instructions were that if you had already started moving, you better not stop. Destroy the crossing gates if necessary, but get off those tracks. Plus, we were trained that if there was not enough room on other side of tracks for the bus, then you sit and wait until there is enough room.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
  15. Schweisshund

    Schweisshund Well-Known Member

    8,732
    304
    83
    I am currently in training for my CDL class A with hazmat endorsement, double and triple trailers. We watch videos like this everyday. I washed out of a trucking companies "accelerated" course (it was not for newbies, it was more or less to get your CDL renewed - a refresher course). The company told me to complete a Tech school program and come back. I had about 4 hours "in the seat" training to do backing maneuvers. Not nearly enough training for someone who has never operated, much less ever been inside, a semi tractor. However, I did get the hang of the blind side parallel.
     
  16. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

    12,826
    830
    113
    He may not have been hurt but he ain't got no living daylights left in him. They all be scared out of him and gone far away.

    Nemo
     
  17. phantoms

    phantoms Senior Mumbler

    6,209
    187
    63
    It looks like he did stop for the tracks though the lucky fedex truck in front of the camera car did not.

    It also looks like he was struggling to pick up speed as a truck hauling doubles in winter conditions would when taking off from a stop.

    Whether the view was diminished from the weather and he just didn't see the train until he was committed, i don't know.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  18. Siege

    Siege Active Member

    3,950
    3
    38
    While I see the sense in stopping to look, I've always wondered about the prudence of that in some situations.

    Particularly like this one, where the weather is inclement and road conditions may prevent speedy acceleration/stopping.

    Additionally in places like those scattered around the Atlanta area where trees and curves in the track prevent one from seeing much more than a couple of hundred yards in either direction...

    It seems to me that stopping prior to crossing may not always be the best idea, because if you are then trying to accelerate across the tracks and either lose traction or suffer a mechanical malfunction AND a train happens to be coming (whether the signals are working or not) then you're that much more likely to get stuck and be hit by the train than if you had just continued across the tracks.

    Would love to see some actual modern studies of rail crossings and whether requiring school buses to stop for them is actually the most prudent advice or not. For all I know, it may well be, but I wonder if it's just old accepted wisdom, or backed up by current research.
     
  19. adams454

    adams454 Member

    505
    2
    18
    Just working off the OP, and no other info, it would appear as though someone on the railroad dropped the ball. If the gates aren't operable, there is a protocol to protect the public. The guy that jumpered them up would have reported it. That would have been passed on to dispatch, and on to the train crew. And the train crew would have stopped to manually flag the crossing. Someone in that sequence didn't do their part.
     
  20. mog

    mog Active Member

    2,307
    1
    38
    I wouldn't think jumping the switch would ever be ok without someone there directing.