Travelling question

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by RPMCanes, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. RPMCanes

    RPMCanes New Member

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    OK, I'm thinking of driving to MA from GA for the holidays. MA has probably the most draconian gun laws in the country, and technically you're supposed to have a license, but given that I'll only be in town for about a week, and before I get there I'm going to unload it, put my trigger lock on it, and put it in the trunk. I'm wondering if I encounter a LEO what kind of risk I'm running being in possesion without a license. Thoughts?
     
  2. rmodel65

    rmodel65 Yukon Cornelius

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    i think id always be leaving the state :p

    is a black powder pistol a gun under there law??
     

  3. mountainman444

    mountainman444 Active Member

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    Yep, just passing through. Seriously, watch your Ps and Qs and why would they stop you and then check your trunk to find it? I'd take it and not think twice about it other than hiding it well. I believe this falls under the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.
     
  4. RPMCanes

    RPMCanes New Member

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    Yeah, that's what I'm thinking. If for whatever reason I'm stopped and I have to open the trunk, if the LEO sees that it is stored & secured properly, and I show him my GFL and NRA Instructor credentials, I doubt I'd get too much hassle.
     
  5. rmodel65

    rmodel65 Yukon Cornelius

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    i dont think those will help you any...i think being on a continuous journey would
     
  6. CountryGun

    CountryGun New Member

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    This! You've got to be able to tell a "little white lie". Tell them you were on your way back from Vermont.
     
  7. SongDogSniper

    SongDogSniper New Member

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    Just be sure you understand what you are dealing with: Massachusetts gun laws can make New York gun laws look quite good in comparison. In 1998, Massachusetts enacted some of the most ridiculous gun control laws in the country. These laws have significantly changed requirements regarding the purchase, possession, carrying, storage, and licensing of firearms.

    In Massachusetts, all local police departments have the authority to issue their own firearms permits. Such permits include licenses to carry (L.T.C.) and firearm identification cards (F.I.D.). There are two types of licenses to carry. Class A licenses to carry allows an individual to purchase, possess and carry large-capacity handguns, rifles, shotguns and feeding devices. A Class A license to carry is the only permit that authorizes a holder to carry a concealed and loaded firearm. A Class B license to carry permits a holder to purchase, possess, and carry non-large capacity handguns and large-capacity rifles and shotguns.

    There are also two types of firearm identification cards. Unrestricted firearm identification cards allow for the possession of non-large capacity rifles and shotguns. And there is a restricted version that they issue for the possession of chemical sprays.

    As a non-resident visiting Massachusetts, you need to look into obtaining a temporary license through the Firearms Record Bureau in order to possess and transport firearms through the Commonwealth as a non-resident. Be warned: Massachusetts imposes harsh penalties on the mere possession and transport of firearms unrelated to criminal or violent conduct.

    With regard to your pistols, keep in mind that a nonresident “may carry a pistol or revolver in and through the commonwealth†for purposes of directly travelling to and from a competition or a meeting or exhibition of collectors, or for the purposes of hunting, provided the person has a valid carry permit from another state whose issuing requirements meet certain guidelines specified under Massachusetts law. If the person is traveling for hunting, he or she must also possess a hunting license issued by Massachusetts or the state of destination. Massachusetts will also issue qualified nonresidents a one-year license to carry a firearm in the Commonwealth.

    The possession of “assault weapons†and “large capacity feeding devices†is forbidden throughout the Commonwealth. Keep in mind Boston is special. Since Boston is authorized under the law to establish its own roster of banned weapons, firearms that are not considered “assault weapons†under state law could conceivably still be covered by the Boston ban.

    My advice to you: contact the Massachusetts Firearms Records Bureau at (617)660-4780 or the State Police at http://www.mass.gov/msp/firearms before you transport firearms into Massachusetts. From what I recall living in the Northeast Corridor, Massachusetts State Police and especially Boston Metro have no problem whatsoever giving visitors to the Commonwealth a roadside introduction to their firearms laws and a free set of S&W nickel plated bracelets, followed by a little detour that you'd be certain to remember, both physically and financially.

    Unless you are qualified active or retired LE carrying under LEOSA, I don't think the Commonwealth will have much respect for any firearms permits issued by Georgia.