Thoughts on 1911 slide modifications

Discussion in 'How to' started by berdar, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. berdar

    berdar New Member

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    I recently ran across a great deal on a Metroarms 1911. The previous owner had something spill behind the seat of his truck and it really mucked up the finish on the slide. The receiver is in pristine condition. As it's a relatively cheap 1911, I'm gonna use it as a project gun to tinker with and learn a little more about working on 1911s.

    My thoughts are to have the slide coated with the water transfer printing process. Similar to the attached image. [​IMG]

    Not necessarily that pattern though.

    My thoughts are that I to get rid of all of the engraving/roll stamping on the slide. I've thought about welding, but i'm concerned with loss of heat treat and warping of the slide.

    What are you guys thoughts on the matter? Would epoxy stay in place, should I weld up and grind down what I don't want or should I just get a new slide without the roll stamps?

    Thanks for your input and ideas.
     
  2. COMMANDER1911

    COMMANDER1911 New Member

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    there is a video on youtube of a feller who finished his 1911 himself. he sanded it and ordered a duracote kit for relatively inexpensive.. the kit came with everything you need. I'll try to find the link and post it. The after product looked like it came out of the factory.
     

  3. score69

    score69 New Member

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    Depending on the depth of the roll marks you are trying to fill, DuraFil may be able to take care of this for you. Never used this stuff myself, but I saw this thread at the CZ forum and thought you might be interested.

    http://www.czforumsite.info/index.php?topic=24344.0
     
  4. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    I would be more inclined to do a solder or lead fill than welding. The temps are a lot lower and you won't have to worry about heat damage. Old school car customizers use a solder/lead fill to fill holes, seams and panel gaps