Third Strike = Out

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by gunsmoker, Jan 2, 2019.

  1. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    49022485-4145-4B9F-B3DB-6B4710697696.jpeg I think we need to amend the constitution to have a third strike and you're dead law.
    Out of society, off the surface of the Earth, not among the living anymore.

    Forget prison. We taxpayers aren't feeding your homicidal, thieving, antisocial, worthless ass for the next 40 or 50 years.

    On your third serious felony conviction, you get to be the halftime show at an athletic event where chopping your head off with a big giant axe over a wooden chopping block will be your earned reward and a warning to the public.


    And do you know who I think should be one of the first recipients of the three strikes and you're dead treatment?
    Mr. Bo Dukes!

    https://www.ajc.com/news/crime--law...d-rape-sodomy-charges/ZgjfU7HgbLnBY53Z2wXsMI/
     
  2. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Might be in company of his brother Luke racing around in a bright orange Dodge Charger.

    Nemo
     
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  3. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Why wait for the third failed attempt at turning one's life around? Recidivism seems to be the primary product of our incarceration policies. Think of all the money that could be saved at all levels of government. And far fewer lawyers! :mrgreen:
     
  4. Fallschirmjäger

    Fallschirmjäger I watch the watchers

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    Much as I'd like to applaud the idea, I have to ask..."What happens when someone who was executed is later proven NOT to have committed the crime?" Do we dig up the body and attempt to reanimate it?

    While swift execution may cost less, you can't really say "Oops, our bad, you were innocent all along" to a corpse.
    According to Wikipedia, one study puts the number of innocent people on death row at 4%. Seems like killing an innocent man is something that we as a nation might want to avoid doing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wrongful_convictions_in_the_United_States#2000s
     
  5. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing wrong with allowing for a reasonable amount of time in which to appeal a guilty verdict. "Reasonable" being the operative word. Perhaps a few years but certainly not decades.

    Malfeasance seems to be a major issue in coercing innocent people to accept guilt, willingly or unwillingly. If proved true, these public officials should be allowed to partake of the state's hospitality.

    The 1989 Tom Selleck movie, "An Innocent Man," comes to mind.
     
  6. Fallschirmjäger

    Fallschirmjäger I watch the watchers

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    What do we say to people like John Bunn who was wrongly convicted of murder way back when he was only 14 years old? He's lucky (well not lucky) that he got life in prison instead of being executed.

    Is it permissible to say "Oops, luck of the draw there, Sport. It happens that sometimes we have to sacrifice a few innocent lives" to him?
    Yes, it's not exactly as presented in the first scenario, but what if he had two felonies earlier and was then wrongly convicted and put to death. How do you do restitution, how do you 'make him whole' again?
    John Bunn murder conviction overturned.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Wheedle

    Wheedle Active Member

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    Anyone watched the movie 'Bad Batch'?
     
  8. zetor

    zetor Gaston beat up John

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    Well SOMEBODY has to pay and the sooner we can just put it all behind us the better

    \
     
  9. GoDores

    GoDores Like a Boss

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    I support the death penalty, but I'm not sure what "three strikes" has to do with anything in this case. It's not clear the suspect has any prior serious felony convictions, or that he faces any such charges now (the article mentions "accusations" of rape and false imprisonment, but not charges).
     
  10. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    I don't think any judicial system anywhere is without fault of some degree. Unless the corruption and malfeasance can be eliminated entirely and the laws themselves more morally justifiable then you end up with people like John Bunn.
     
  11. Craftsman

    Craftsman Well-Known Member

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    I firmly believe that a person can forfeit their right to breath via certain actions against their fellow human beings. I am not convinced we have an adequate judicial system capable of coming to the correct determination as to when someone has truly committed such an action.
     
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  12. Fallschirmjäger

    Fallschirmjäger I watch the watchers

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    Moe, I fully accept that any judicial system anywhere is without fault of some degree.
    But here's the thing, if someone is wrongly convicted and serves a life sentence (Mr. Bunn) if there is evidence clearing him he can be released at some point. With the death penalty.... the chances of bringing back to life are somewhat reduced.
     
  13. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    That's not really a "mistake."

    If he is innocent, it is because one detective made up "tips" to arrest him and his alleged accomplice, and the victim either lied or misidentified the both of them.

    Making up a "tip" would be intentional misconduct.

    So as long as we have dishonest cops, then no death penalty?
     
  14. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    The bad cop usually doesn't pay - personally - for his malfeasance. Unless that changes, nothing else will change.
     
  15. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Understood but like I said earlier there has to be a reasonable time frame in place. People are on death rows for decades. That just doesn't make any sense. It's truly unfortunate for the innocent person.
     
  16. ber950

    ber950 Active Member

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    I still believe in the concept of the death penalty. However as long as we are not going to execute killers like Brian Nichols and Amp Wiley I think its lost its effectiveness.
     
  17. mrhutch

    mrhutch Well-Known Member

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    I support offenders being shot by their would be victims on the first strike.
     
  18. Fallschirmjäger

    Fallschirmjäger I watch the watchers

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    I didn't say 'mistakenly' convicted; I said 'wrongly convicted'. Whether he was convicted because of faulty or manufactured evidence, he was still convicted of a crime he did not commit.
    You can release someone from prison, but it's just an itty bitty bit harder to bring them back from the dead. I can only think of one instance in history where that is reputed to have happened.
     
  19. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I can think of several examples, but none relevant to your point. More to your point, I do not think we should require perfection from a criminal justice system in order to have a death penalty, which is what you are asking.
     
  20. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Perfection, no. A helluva lot better than what we have--dayum sure right.

    Nemo