The Failure of Public Schooling in One Chart

Discussion in 'Off-topic Political' started by EJR914, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    https://fee.org/articles/the-failure-of-public-schooling-in-one-chart/
     
  2. phantoms

    phantoms Senior Mumbler

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    Thank you. It's a good read.
     

  3. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Student populations and test scores remain relatively unchanged over a 40 year period. Yet school employees and costs are shooting through the roof over the same time period.

    So apparently becoming a part of the bloated educational bureaucracy is a great way to ensure your retirement plans while the kids still don't know sh*t from Shinola.

    Sounds like some local school boards have some splainin to do.

    And why do we still have a federal education department again?
     
  4. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    One of the top retirement plans in the entire country is the GA Teacher's Retirement plan. 20+ years and 80% of pay. Many of the "senior" educators then come back at 49% time and get a huge pay bump. 2.5 weeks at Christmas, a week at Thanksgiving, Summer off, Federal Holidays, a "Spring Break"..... and top educators in metro Atlanta make $100K with higher degrees (that are typically useless in the classroom) and years of service. And getting fired.....forget about it. Are there good teachers out there - absolutely. Are there too many useless paper pushing bureaucrats that actually harm education sucking at the teat of the government schools - also absolutely.
     
  5. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    Has the student population remained unchanged? That seems odd with an increasing population. I don't doubt the US education system needs an overhaul but I hate images like this that suggest a cause & affect merely by the data they chose to include vs. exclude. You see the same with stupid things like when they quote the number of gun sales in the US vs. deaths in Chicago or some other data elements that don't have a correlation, but they suggest that they do by putting them together. Why would the staff be increasing if the student volume wasn't? Is it all 'administrators'? School board staff? Does the "cost" include inflation?
     
  6. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    I don't know enough about the specifics on this program to comment.
    And in exchange they work 60+ hour weeks. 40 hours a week for 50 weeks is 2000 hours. 2000 hours divided by 60 hours is 33.3 weeks. Or about the length of the school year.
    That's how it works...everywhere. Higher degrees generally engender higher salaries.
    You're kidding right? Teachers are one of the least protected public employees in the state of Georgia!
    Yes, and they all exist at the top. Worthless "specialists" pushing their ridiculous programs and plans that never work (NewMath? Common Core? Math 1,2,3,4) and usually get tried out and rejected out west (these are things even looney land liberals in California reject!) before being tried here.
     
  7. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    Believe what you will. Higher degrees are generally irrelevant (all the research indicates they have no relationship to student outcome in classroom teachers) to the job duties but they get the teachers huge % increases for no added value to the student. There are some who work those hours, they are rare. Happy New Year.
     
  8. phaed

    phaed Active Member

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    i don't even think that chart shows the worst of it. the way test scores have been calculated have been changed to become more lenient, as well. the chart holds it as a constant.
     
  9. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    All great posts, gentlemen
     
  10. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    I said "relatively" unchanged. Look at the graph. The student population fluctuates up and down but not nearly to the degree of employee changes.

    I didn't vet the details obviously. Maybe there are more students attending private schools today dropping the public school numbers. Regardless, there's still something terribly wrong in education-land.
     
  11. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I was looking for additional information and found this, which clearly shows little growth in the student population (+8%) since 1970:
    [​IMG]
    And these articles citing no correlation between spending on school budget and academic achievement:
    http://www.politifact.com/virginia/statements/2015/mar/02/dave-brat/brat-us-school-spending-375-percent-over-30-years-/
    http://washington.cbslocal.com/2014/04/07/study-no-link-between-school-spending-student-achievement/
     
  12. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    Again, its the NON-teaching staff that has far outstripped both student increases and teacher increases. Cherokee County went from the metro county with the lowest admin-to-student ratio to the highest under the superintendent that just retired (he had been bought out of both his contracts in Tx and FL prior to being hired in Cherokee BTW). Cherokee has no charter HS, no magnet HS, and no IB HS but has the most administrators per student. It's not about educating children, its about employing NEA members.
     
  13. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    What the heck is THAT supposed to mean?
     
  14. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    What it says. Its all about employing more and more staff and not about actually educating children. If it were, for example, we'd use McGuffey readers and not "Whole Language" to teach children to read. 8% increase in students, 138% increase in non-teaching staff kinda says it all.
     
  15. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I can agree with that. The NEA part threw me for a minute. Further, I fully agree on that point, there's too much bloated overhead in the schools now, most of it above the level of the school itself.
     
  16. timbrubaker

    timbrubaker I may be slow, but I sure am ugly

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    I have copies of all four of the McGuffey Eclectic Readers. The only improvement wrought by switching to a "modern" textbook was to the bank accounts of publishers.
     
  17. phaed

    phaed Active Member

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    that's no doubt at least partly due to compliance with federal mandates...at least that's the excuse they'll use to fund hiring of all their buddies. it's little wonder why limited government is a fairy tale.
     
  18. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Not having had any children in the education system for many years, exactly what are all these non-teaching positions? Custodial? Useless paper pushers? Law enforcement (lots of school districts have full police forces)?
     
  19. REW

    REW Member

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    Retirement is 30 years at 60%
    Two weeks at Christmas
    Teachers get fired all the time.
    Classroom teachers work far more than 40 hours per week