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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I go the part about a $200 tax stamp to manufacture...

Beyond that, why is a suppressor so dang expensive? $600 for a metal tube with some machined parts inside? Are thre any decent plans for homemade suppressors? What about those that are recoil-assisted?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
drtybykr said:
Interesting. Does it cost another $200 to change the oil filter?

budder said:
Looks like you understand it completely. $200 to manufacture, which keeps competition down and prices up. Silencertalk has a smithing forum with designs and many more experienced people: http://www.silencertalk.com/forum/viewf ... 21932d34aa. There's another fairly big silencer forum, but I can't remember what it is right now.
Thanks for the link.
 

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Discussion Starter #5


I see a tube, a slightly smaller tube cut into sections as spacers, and a bunch of washers. Swipe a spring from a car thermostat and fab up a simple recoil booster, and you're still looking at something like $30.
 

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IMO, two things.
- Perceived value
- The market bears it.

If a quality suppressor manufacturer opened up and started selling them at half the current market price, they'd be swamped with orders in no time (increased demand) and then most likely increase their prices... or possibly/hopefully just increase wait times. I think (nothing to back it up, just my opinion) there's some amount of collusion between manufacturer's to maintain market level pricing where it is so they can keep their profit levels up. Not saying there's anything wrong with that, but speaking as a consumer, it would sure be nice to get prices down a little bit. Situations like this are a good opportunity for newcomers to the business though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There are tons and tons of differently-shaped baffle designs on silencertalk. I wonder how much difference they make versus something simple like I posted above.
 

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ChipM said:
There are tons and tons of differently-shaped baffle designs on silencertalk. I wonder how much difference they make versus something simple like I posted above.
I do not think the one you posted would work as well as some of the others, but that's just my uneducated opinion. I have an SWR Spectre, which has a more complicated shape and, I imagine, results in a better transfer of energy: http://www.swrmfg.com/Rim-Fire-Suppress ... ectre.html
 

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$75+ per hour of machining. The extra paperwork and waiting that goes with the stamp means those things don't go flying off the shelves. The lower demand makes it more difficult to justify spending the setup cash for cheaper manufacturing methods.

http://www.silencerco.com/?section=Prod ... ge=Sparrow
Probably $20-30 in materials including o-rings and finish.
Probably 2 hours of machining, assembly, and engraving with good jigs and/or CNC.
Toss in a coating and the dealer cost has to cover that plus any testing gear, R&D, ATF paperwork, SOT, and the power bill.
I don't figure there is a mint in it for the manufacturer though because dealers move them at a healthy discount below the $499 MSRP.

Yeah, I could probably make one at home for less, but I'd need $200 in tools and $80 in stuff for finishing. Then I'd probably break even if my time were worth $0.50/hr. :shattered:

They get more expensive for any design involving welding and titanium...
 

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The idea of using flat washers as baffles is attractive for its simplicity, but even 120 years ago when the first silencers were developed, the baffles were not flat. They were cone-shaped, with the hole projecting back toward the gun to meet the bullet.
A popular silencer baffle design today is a "K" shaped baffle, I hear. One side flat and one side cone.
Other factory-made silencers use baffles that are semi-circular, back to back, with the hole on the downrange side of the bullet's path, after it passes through the big opening between baffles.

Anyhow, I would seriously consider making my own silencer rather than pay $900 for a centerfire rifle caliber one.

But when it came to a .22LR silencer, I chose to buy it not build it. It was only $325.

I've heard of criminal gangs making their own silencers in basement workshops, and from what I've heard from law enforcement people, they work pretty well.
 

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All suppressors aren't made as cheaply as you seem to think. Manufacturers like AAC have solid inconel internals or an inconel blast baffle with the rest of the baffle made of SS. They are robtically welded making a solid core then the bore is edm'd out. Sure the picture of the suppressor you posted would probably work just fine for a bolt action or slow semi-auto but with rapid fire or f/a use they would likely fail spectacularly at least with rifle cans. What you are paying for is R&D and overhead. Sure they are making money, why would they be manufacturing them if they couldn't? You would sure have a lot more time and money involved in making a suppressor if you had to buy all of the equipment to get started and would likely have something that didn't preform nearly as well.
 

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You could build your own, but do you have the tools, lathe, metal, and evertything else needed to start and finish the project? Has the design been tested? Compared to a commercial design what is the decibel reduction with your homemade silencer?

If I had the knowledge and the tools I'd try to make one, unfortunately I'm not spending a few thousand to buy the materials and tools needed to make a silencer.
 

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ChipM said:


I see a tube, a slightly smaller tube cut into sections as spacers, and a bunch of washers. Swipe a spring from a car thermostat and fab up a simple recoil booster, and you're still looking at something like $30.
I missed the bit about making this a boosted can the first time through. Making can that will function with a pistol is a whole nother ball game. There are even manufacturers who have failed to make cans that would cycle reliably with most pistols. I believe there was a Gemtech can from a few years ago that was notorious for not cycling on many pistols. If you truly wanted to make your own pistol can I think you would be better off buying a booster from a reputable silencer company and building your F1 suppressor around that.

I assume you realize that photo is a rifle can.
 

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Jmark said:
All suppressors aren't made as cheaply as you seem to think. Manufacturers like AAC have solid inconel internals or an inconel blast baffle with the rest of the baffle made of SS. They are robtically welded making a solid core then the bore is edm'd out. Sure the picture of the suppressor you posted would probably work just fine for a bolt action or slow semi-auto but with rapid fire or f/a use they would likely fail spectacularly at least with rifle cans. What you are paying for is R&D and overhead. Sure they are making money, why would they be manufacturing them if they couldn't? You would sure have a lot more time and money involved in making a suppressor if you had to buy all of the equipment to get started and would likely have something that didn't preform nearly as well.
My link was to a rimfire suppressor. FA use is noted in their specs. ;)
It doesn't quite compare to a pistol suppressor with a recoil booster or a centerfire rifle suppressor rated for full auto. Both of those obviously add costs.

Pricing off of AAC for a suppressor is like pricing Colt for an AR-15. The consumer pays more for the brand than the R&D costs. They are getting better through competition though. They dropped the price on the Tirant by $200 and made the Pilot user serviceable. Most people attribute that to Silencerco's R&D. ;)

If it weren't for the NFA requirements, suppressors could be made of cast plastic and be sold in 6-packs next to hearing protection in Walmart. For some reason people aren't interested in anything that has a few hundred or a mere thousand round longevity if it requires a $200 tax and a multi-month wait to purchase. That is the same reason there isn't much of a secondary market for suppressors. If I pay $400 for a new suppressor then add in the $200 tax stamp, I'm out $600. The best I could do is maybe sell it to a friend for $300 on which they'll have to add another $200 stamp costing them $500. If they live across a state line from me, then there has to be an additional $200 stamp to their dealer. At that point they are out $500 if I let it go for $100. Not many people like selling with that kind of a drop in value and many more decide $100 more is worth the cost for a new suppressor with a warranty (and in out-of-state cases, one less stamp).
 

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45_Fan said:
Jmark said:
All suppressors aren't made as cheaply as you seem to think. Manufacturers like AAC have solid inconel internals or an inconel blast baffle with the rest of the baffle made of SS. They are robtically welded making a solid core then the bore is edm'd out. Sure the picture of the suppressor you posted would probably work just fine for a bolt action or slow semi-auto but with rapid fire or f/a use they would likely fail spectacularly at least with rifle cans. What you are paying for is R&D and overhead. Sure they are making money, why would they be manufacturing them if they couldn't? You would sure have a lot more time and money involved in making a suppressor if you had to buy all of the equipment to get started and would likely have something that didn't preform nearly as well.
My link was to a rimfire suppressor. FA use is noted in their specs. ;)
It doesn't quite compare to a pistol suppressor with a recoil booster or a centerfire rifle suppressor rated for full auto. Both of those obviously add costs.

Pricing off of AAC for a suppressor is like pricing Colt for an AR-15. The consumer pays more for the brand than the R&D costs. They are getting better through competition though. They dropped the price on the Tirant by $200 and made the Pilot user serviceable. Most people attribute that to Silencerco's R&D. ;)

If it weren't for the NFA requirements, suppressors could be made of cast plastic and be sold in 6-packs next to hearing protection in Walmart. For some reason people aren't interested in anything that has a few hundred or a mere thousand round longevity if it requires a $200 tax and a multi-month wait to purchase. That is the same reason there isn't much of a secondary market for suppressors. If I pay $400 for a new suppressor then add in the $200 tax stamp, I'm out $600. The best I could do is maybe sell it to a friend for $300 on which they'll have to add another $200 stamp costing them $500. If they live across a state line from me, then there has to be an additional $200 stamp to their dealer. At that point they are out $500 if I let it go for $100. Not many people like selling with that kind of a drop in value and many more decide $100 more is worth the cost for a new suppressor with a warranty (and in out-of-state cases, one less stamp).
I was referring to the OP, not what you stated, though I agree with pretty much everything you said.
 
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