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GAGunOwner said:
But for the frisk to be constitutionally valid, police must have a "reasonable suspicion" that a crime has occurred or that criminal activity "is afoot." A mere hunch is not enough, the court said, adding that the officer must be able to clearly state why he thought the person might be about to commit a crime.
Duh!

Send this to Gwinnett! :lol:
 

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legacy38 said:
In order to "stop" someone, an officer must have a reasonable and articulable suspicion that criminal activity is afoot. An officer may initiate a contact for no reason whatsoever, but a citizen is under no obligation to participate in the contact.
I just wish they all knew this!
 

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GAGunOwner said:
He said people in high-crime neighborhoods initially are glad when police make stops and even accept when their own kids are frisked.

"But by the third or fourth time," he said parents told him, "it didn't feel good at all. It felt like harassment."
Yeah, I imagine it gets pretty old. This has a parallel to open carry.
 

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GAGunOwner said:
. . . then I'd show them the GFL and walk away. :lol:
As you feel the taser probes enter your skin between the shoulder blades and hit the pavement . . .

And not really recall what happens next until you are in jail waiting to bond out on a public gathering charge . . .

:D
 

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legacy38 said:
Sharky said:
You think people are just afraid to say no to a police officer? So I am guessing nobody has asked you "am I free to go officer" either?
People think that saying "no" will "make them look guilty" :roll:

I've had a few people ask if they were free to go. Oddly enough though, they typically will stick around if asked to do so.
That's why you also have to ask it while walking away. :wink:
 

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legacy38 said:
In order to "stop" someone, an officer must have a reasonable and articulable suspicion that criminal activity is afoot. An officer may initiate a contact for no reason whatsoever, but a citizen is under no obligation to participate in the contact.
What is the reasonable and articulable suspicion that a person openly carrying a holstered HK 45 USP C while shopping for dog food at Petsmart has no license?

How does an officer go about articulating that?

Don't say, "Your GUN gives me all the probable cause I need."
 

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Malum Prohibitum said:
legacy38 said:
In order to "stop" someone, an officer must have a reasonable and articulable suspicion that criminal activity is afoot. An officer may initiate a contact for no reason whatsoever, but a citizen is under no obligation to participate in the contact.
What is the reasonable and articulable suspicion that a person openly carrying a holstered HK 45 USP C while shopping for dog food at Petsmart has no license?

How does an officer go about articulating that?

Don't say, "Your GUN gives me all the probable cause I need."
 
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