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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This question is for those who have experience working with leather. I have an old leather jacket that is worn, frayed and was in storage and got chewed up by rodents in some areas. I want to use the material to make snake gaiters for my 7 year old son. The plan is to sandwich some type of material between two layers of leather to make a snake bite proof gaiter that can be worn while hiking.

What type of material or fabric should I get to put between the layers of leather? I originally thought that some roof flashing might be bendable enough and snake fang proof, but is there something else? I am going to use deep sea woven fishing line for the stitching and have it lace up (I have a harbor freight leather punch and grommet maker for the lace holes).

Any suggestions are welcome. If you work on leather and could charge me a reasonable rate, I very well would just go that route. If you live in the proximity of Holly Springs/Woodstock, I could bring my son in for measurements and drop off the jacket.

In addition to the gaiter, I would like a "skirt" added to cover ankles.

Thanks in advance.

Brown Sleeve Wood Grey Denim

Brown Sleeve Natural material Collar Leather jacket
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
While Academy, Cabela's etc. Sell snake gaiters, they are for adults. I am finding it very difficult to find anything for kids, and the walmart brand does not fit my son.

Edit to add: I would also prefer that the measurements would allow him to wear them over pants. Also, when he outgrows them, they will be gifted to another 6-7 year old that wants to explore the outdoors.
 

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Armchair quarterbacking 2 topics.
1) Apparently snake chaps are for kids and gaiters are for adults. I guess that makes sense as strike height for adult knees/thighs is on up there.
2) I would figure leather gaiters may be hotter and swampier than I’d tolerate but if you are going for science, I’d combine the leather and some heavy duty construction plastic (UHMW-PE) and give it the ice pick stab test over soft and hard backing to see what you get.

If you are mostly stationary weight won’t matter much. For hiking any distance, the rule of thumb was that an extra ounce on the feet was the same as a pound in a backpack where fatigue was concerned.
 

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Flexible fiberglass sheeting. Put no hardener on it, flex, wrap and sew into position. Cover with leather.

Nemo

 
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