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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious to know just how far the average citizen (law abiding, carrying citizen) goes with situational awareness.

I like to think I maintain decent SA. Take a trip to the grocery store for example. I keep track of where the cameras are in the parking lot, and park accordingly. As I pull up I'm looking around to see anything out of the ordinary. People lingering aimlessly up to no good, etc. Always keeping track of who and what are around me. I make it a point to familiarize myself with all emergency exits available and keep a SHTF plan. I run through various scenarios in my head and how I would need to react.

I carry a pocket medical kit, flashlight, pocket knife, handgun, spare mag, etc.

what more should I do? I don't want to push into paranoia, but I would like to get others perspectives to cover anything I may not have thought of.

I appreciate all of your input.

If I posted this in the wrong section, I apologize.
 

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A cell phone would be good! Also, it's always nice to have at least one extra set of eyes! Safety in numbers you know.
 
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A cell phone would be good! Also, it's always nice to have at least one extra set of eyes! Safety in numbers you know.
Yeah, I didn't include all of my EDC items lol, iphone 5 that I'm on right now is always with me. My fiancé is typically with me if I didn't work that day.

I should mention though, she is not typically very alert. Sometimes to the point of a liability. Absorbed in her phone while texting and walking.
 

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...I carry a pocket medical kit, flashlight, pocket knife, handgun, spare mag, etc.

what more should I do? I don't want to push into paranoia, but I would like to get others perspectives to cover anything I may not have thought of.

I appreciate all of your input.

If I posted this in the wrong section, I apologize.
Sounds like you have the bases pretty well covered. In my truck and my range bag I have a home grown trauma kit AND I've taken the Red Cross First Aid, CPR, AED course... for whatever benefit that is; point being it's not just having all the stuff, it's also knowing how to use it.

Allan
 

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For me, Situtational Awareness is a Tradecraft. There is tons of writing on the subject.

Also, it helps if you have some mentalist talents or skills as well.

Basically, its about not walking into the "X," and putting yourself in the middle of a bad situation.

Always scanning side to side, and also using your peripheral vision, reading body language, reading faces, reading body language while others are talking, covertly watching hands, being able to spot the one thing or few things that are wrong with a situation then act according to miss a potentially bad situation, also trusting your gut/ 6th sense. It was put there for a reason. Listen to it when it is screaming at you. Don't deny it. Worst of all, don't put yourself in a bad situation because you don't want to be seen as sexist or racist. If you're gut is yelling at you, listen to it.

Little things like looking into glass, mirrors, or reflective objects which allow you to see what is happening behind you, without you having to turn around and physically look.

After a lot of practice, this just becomes as easy ass breathing. You just do it naturally without thinking about it.

Positioning your vehicle certain ways, not putting yourself in bad situations, trying to think like a bad guy and do the opposite or something to counter the bad guy. Don't go to the bad part of town unless forced to.

Knowing where all the exits are before you go into a place. Think about scenarios while you're in a potentially bad situation and what you would do if they happened. In restaurants try and get a table and sit in the seat that will put your front to the most likely place a bad situation would come from, while having your back to a wall, which is unlikely a threat will come from it.
 

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Sounds like you have the bases pretty well covered. In my truck and my range bag I have a home grown trauma kit AND I've taken the Red Cross First Aid, CPR, AED course... for whatever benefit that is; point being it's not just having all the stuff, it's also knowing how to use it.

Allan
Yep, knowledge in your brain is weightless.
 

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Head on a swivel. Anyone within 7 yards is a potential immediate threat (why I hate crowds). Constant evaluation and reevaluation. Code words for you and your partner. My ex and I both hated Pepsi; if either of us said something about it in any way we both knew the other had spotted a threat.

Always know your exits. Keep an eye on all the entrances. Assess everyone you see for their potential.
 

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Another thing, don't get caught getting mesmerized by a smart phone or whatever while out in public. Find a safer, more private area to do all that business with. Also, try and stay aware while talking on your phone in public as well.
 
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Bumping this old thread with a new article on the topic.
This was written the other week by Dan C., the co-author and publisher of my Georgia Weapons Laws book.
It's based on a series of presentations he's given and I've seen him give, personally, numerous times to audiences at places like Bass Pro Shops, were we would both do seminars and presentations to educate people about the role of firearms in personal protection, but which would often include other related topics like good locks and alarms for your home, and having good SITUATIONAL AWARENESS when out of your home.

https://nationalconcealedcarryassoc...ness-a-vital-skill-that-could-save-your-life/

This article is much shorter than his hour-long presentation on this topic would be if he were speaking in person, but I suppose the website (Nat'l Concealed Carry Association) has space limitations.

What are your thoughts and comments?
 
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I have two comments:

In the article, Dan mentions the OODA loop and offers a graph of how it works, but can't take the time to explain it. He says you'll have to look this one up yourself. I can give a simple illustration of how I use the OODA loop to make quick decisions when I'm driving and approaching a traffic light at 55+ miles per hour.
I observe the light ahead, its distance to me, my speed, and my anticipated route going through that intersection. I recognize the potential problem-- I orient myself to the situation. I tell myself "if that light changes to yellow just as I am getting near to it, I'll have to make a fast choice whether to go through it or brake hard. Choosing the wrong thing could very quickly cause an accident or get me a ticket."

I decide on a plan that will help me make a decision-- I pick a spot along the road that seems to be the "point of no return" for stopping safely without excessive braking or skidding. I identify a landmark-- a utility pole, a fence post, a pothole, a bush or unusually tall weed growing next to the road--and say to myself: "If green becomes yellow before I reach this point, I stop. If my car is alongside that point when it changes, I keep going."

The action step is to actually do what you've planned to do, but even as you initially begin implementing your plan, you ONCE AGAIN scan the area (observe) to look for any changed circumsstances that would make your plan less safe than it seemed a few seconds ago. If you were planning on stopping, is that big landscaping truck towing a bobcat on a trailer, following you down the highway only 50 yards back, ALSO going to stop? Can that vehicle brake safely in the distance that you can? Or, if you intend to go through the yellow light per your plan, will you STILL stick to that after you observe an ambulance coming fast toward the intersection on the cross street? Or do you re-orient yourself to your new circumstances and re-decide how to proceed?
 

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The other comment about Dan's article on situation awareness:

The last two times I used a Redbox machine to rent DVD's, I realized it was pretty much IMPOSSIBLE to maintain situational awareness while interacting with the screen.

Sure, you could assess the conditions of the parking lot and look around for suspicious people before you park and get out of your vehicle, but once you start dealing with the machine, it demands all of your attention.

That's a situation where you should go with an armed friend who covers you both while you are distracted by the RedBox.
 
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That's a situation where you should go with an armed friend who covers you both while you are distracted by the RedBox.
Finally, a reason to buy a Barrett M82.

"I'm going for the Red Box, so I need you and the Barrett on that hill *points* there, about 1500 yards to the North-Northwest."

I haven't used a Red Box, but when I was younger and about the night life, I only went to drive-up ATMs, and I always made sure I was *very* close so there was no possibility of an assailant interposing themselves between the machine and my window. If you can't observe the environment, remove it (or make it too small).

DH
 

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Finally, a reason to buy a Barrett M82.

"I'm going for the Red Box, so I need you and the Barrett on that hill *points* there, about 1500 yards to the North-Northwest."

I haven't used a Red Box, but when I was younger and about the night life, I only went to drive-up ATMs, and I always made sure I was *very* close so there was no possibility of an assailant interposing themselves between the machine and my window. If you can't observe the environment, remove it (or make it too small).

DH
or maybe move to a better neighborhood......
 

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What neighborhood is so safe that you shouldn't practice situational awareness when standing next to a Redbox machine at night?
(Hint: There is no such neighborhood)
 

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or maybe move to a better neighborhood......
Nothing to do with your neighborhood. I use dhaller's method when I use my bank's drive-up ATM. It's a single branch in a fair neighborhood. I pull up tight to the wall, truck is in gear so door locks don't disengage and my pistol is on the console pointing toward the passenger window (if I'm alone). You want my $20 you're going to have to earn it the old fashioned way. :lol:
 
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Pinkbox....pull up tight to the wall...in gear...don't disengage.....she's gonna earn that $20 the old fashioned way...
 

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Nothing to do with your neighborhood. I use dhaller's method when I use my bank's drive-up ATM. It's a single branch in a fair neighborhood. I pull up tight to the wall, truck is in gear so door locks don't disengage and my pistol is on the console pointing toward the passenger window (if I'm alone). You want my $20 you're going to have to earn it the old fashioned way.
I didn't think there were many places outside of Nevada where earning $20 the old fashioned way was legal.
 

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Maybe he knows people?

Nemo
 
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