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Tactical Statistician
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
..... or at least tell me about them.

I recently heard straight from the horse's mouth that SIG is getting ready to release a 226 Combat with an optional threaded barrel. I am curious what it takes to get a suppressor - legally, that is. Also, what would one cost (ballpark)?

BTW The 2nd generation SAS pistols will be released by the end of the month as well. They will now offer 239s and 229s in 9mm, .40, and .357. They will be DA/SA and have front and rear SigLite Night Sights. I believe they will have the plastic grips rather than the fat wooden ones like the original SAS pistols.
 

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Well there is the trust route which to most is the easiest, going to your CLEO for his signature, or setting up a corporation. Cost will probably be in the $700 to $1000 range including the $200 tax.

I know that is oversimplified a bit but I suggest talking to a CIII dealer about what you want. I know that Polite Society Inc. has been helping folks to setup a trust and they have lots of nice stuff to demo.
 

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VOLGRAD said:
What ... no one?
shhhh...

you have to very quiet to get their attention.

8)

In all honesty I'm not sure you want to see any cans, specially since Mack discovered the darker side of the internets.

Cue Mack in...
3...
2...
1...
 

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GPDO Commonlaw Spouse
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Typical prices on suppressors range anywhere from $200-$800 depending on caliber & application. For instance, a screw on suppressor designed for a .22LR pistol is going to be on one end of the spectrum, and a .30 cal quick release model for a rifle on the other. That price range does not include the $200 transfer tax stamp that you pay to the BATFE.

There are 2 main ways to obtain a commercially manufactured suppressor. The first is to have it transfered to yourself personally. This requires that you purchase the suppressor, then fill out the BATFE Form 4, get your self fingerprinted, photographed, get your local CLEO to sign the form, and send it to the BATFE for approval. When the forms come back approved, you go pick up your suppressor.

The second way is to have the suppressor transfered to a Trust or Corporation. This process is similar to the above, except since the trust/corporation is not a natural person, there is no requirement for fingerprints & photographs, or CLEO signature. One advantage of this route, aside from less work in the application process, is that any officer of the trust/corporation may be in possession of the NFA items that have been transferred to it. Also, this is a good work around for people in localities that have CLEOs that don't like to play ball.

That is my understanding of it, IANAL.
 

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Tactical Statistician
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good suggestion on Kyle. I also have another LEO acquaintance who has suggested I get a CAN. He seems to be pretty knowledgeable in regard to firearms and legality. I might ask them some questions. I should see the second of the above listed folks within the next week or so.

With regard to caliber, etc. it would be for a 9mm Sig 226 with a threaded barrel.
 

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GPDO Commonlaw Spouse
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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Nice List, Hydro

Good job on the list of silencer suppliers, Hydro.
That's going to save somebody a lot of work.

In a minute I'll post a pic of my suppressor,
though it's only a .22 long rifle one. If I got one in a centerfire
caliber, I think I'd have to take up handloading so that I could
produce cheap subsonic loads in 9mm.

There really is a "crack" that comes from the bullet
flying at above Mach 1 that is not there when it's below
that speed-- about 1100 f.p.s.

 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Almost

Okay, I changed my post above to say that Mach 1 is about 1,100 feet per second. That's roughly accurate for most applications of silencers here on the surface of Earth.

The general rule is that cold air is more dense (the molecules are closer together) and thus a better conductor of sound than hot air would be. So the speed of sound will go up on cold days and down on hot days, if there are no other variables. But the difference will not be enough to change anything from a practical standpoint. All engineering calculations for what is Mach 1 in any particular scenario use a "typical day" set of numbers as to temperature. What counts more is atmospheric pressure, which can be changed by weather conditions, or just by going to different elevations above sea level.

But even then the difference is small, if you're talking about shooting a silencer while on the ground or in a building here on earth. Whether you're on shooting jellyfish along the beach at Panama City Beach or popping crows off the ski lift cables at Aspen, Colorado, the value of Mach 1 will not vary more than a couple dozen f.p.s., and the published velocity of a certain ammo load can have more than that degree of error in it.

Check out these tables:
Mach 1 at various elevations
 

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Tactical Statistician
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have no idea what all that means. I was just thinking about sticking something on the end of a barrel (other than a potato :lol: ) so the BANG wasn't quiet quite so loud.
 

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Re: Almost

gunsmoker said:
Okay, I changed my post above to say that Mach 1 is about 1,100 feet per second. That's roughly accurate for most applications of silencers here on the surface of Earth.

The general rule is that cold air is more dense (the molecules are closer together) and thus a better conductor of sound than hot air would be. So the speed of sound will go up on cold days and down on hot days, if there are no other variables. But the difference will not be enough to change anything from a practical standpoint. All engineering calculations for what is Mach 1 in any particular scenario use a "typical day" set of numbers as to temperature. What counts more is atmospheric pressure, which can be changed by weather conditions, or just by going to different elevations above sea level.

But even then the difference is small, if you're talking about shooting a silencer while on the ground or in a building here on earth. Whether you're on shooting jellyfish along the beach at Panama City Beach or popping crows off the ski lift cables at Aspen, Colorado, the value of Mach 1 will not vary more than a couple dozen f.p.s., and the published velocity of a certain ammo load can have more than that degree of error in it.

Check out these tables:
Mach 1 at various elevations
It would've been easier if you had just said:

a = sqrt( gamma * R * T)

where

a = speed of sound
R = gas constant (= 286 m^2 /( s^2 * deg K) for air)
gamma = ratio of specific heats (= 1.4 for air)

T = outside air temperature

adjusting the units is left as an exercise for the reader.
With this you can just calculate the value on any given day, independent of altitude.
 

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Smoke Eating Haxor
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Thread jacking just took on a whole new meaning ;-)
 
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