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GeePeeDoHolic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a new book on a whim from a Christian bookstore: The Portable Patriot.

It has a nice collection of various letters, speeches, and documents that illuminate American history.

The following struck me as the Sheepdog story set in 1755.

The wise Creator has adapted the natural Genius of Mankind, with a surprising and beautiful Variety to the State in which they are placed in this World. To some he has given a Turn for intellectual Improvement, and the liberal Arts and Sciences; to others a Genius for Trade; to others a Dexterity in Mechanics, and the ruder Arts, necessary for the Support of himan Life: The Generality of Mankind may be capable of tolerable Improvements in any of these: But it is only they whom the God of Nature has formed for them, that will shine in them, every Man in his own Province. And as God well knew what a World of degenerate, ambitious, and revengeful Creatures this is; as he knew that Innocence could not be protected, Property and Liberty secure, nor the Lives of Mankind preserved from the lawless Hands of Ambition, Avarice and Tyranny, without the Use of the Sword; as he knew this would be the only Method to preserve Mankind from universal Slavery; he has formed some Men for this dreadful Work, and fired them with a martial Spirit, and a glorious Love of Danger. Such a Spirit, though most pernicious when ungoverned by the Rules of Justice, and Benevolence to Mankind, is a public Blessing, when rightly directed: Such a Spirit, under God, has often mortified the Insolence of Tyrants, checked the Incroachments of arbitrary Power, and delivered enslaved and ruined Nations: It is as necessary in its Place, for our Subsistence in such a World as this, as any of the gentler Genius's among Mankind; and it is derived from the same divine Original.
RELIGION AND PATROTISM, The Constituents of a Good SOLDIER.
A SERMON Preached to Captain Overton's Independent Company of Volunteers, raised in Hanover County, Virginia, August 17, 1755
by Samuel Davies, A.M. Minister of the Gospel there.

http://openlibrary.org/books/OL6621008M ... od_soldier

Later in the pamphlet, he refers to an instance of "some Sparks of this Martial Fire" with a footnote:

As a remarkable Instance of this, I may point out to the Public that heroic Youth Col. Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a Manner, for some important Service to his Country.
George Washington was famous before he got famous. :)
 

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Rugerer said:
George Washington was famous before he got famous. :)
General Washington was a bad dude. He was not afraid to get into it, and scrap with whomever. He did a lot of withdrawling during the Revolution, but that was more of an effort to starve and tire the other side and preserve his Army than it was a sign of cowardice. He used what is called Fabien tactics. Lot's of stories too of him brushing shot from his wig after a battle,Coat full of bullet holes...never so much a scratch on the man.
 

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Great post! :D
 

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GeePeeDoHolic
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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GeePeeDoHolic
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
gruntpain1775 said:
General Washington was a bad dude.
Ron Chernow said:
Protective of his hunting grounds, he was implacable when dealing with poachers. One day when out riding, he encountered a poacher who was furtively slipping away in a canoe. “Raising his gun,†recounts a neighbor, the poacher “took deliberate aim at Washington, expecting to daunt him; but Washington dashed up to the culprit, and seizing his canoe, dragged it ashore. He then disarmed him and gave him a severe flogging, which effectually cured his thieving properties.â€
Washington: A Life, p. 124

Dauntless, that's him. :)
 

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GeePeeDoHolic
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It has been said that a “special Providence watches over children, drunkards, and the United States.â€

Then he personally led the charge up the hill, halting only when they had pushed within thirty yards of their adversaries. As he issued the command to fire, Washington, on his white charger, was such a conspicuous target that Fitzgerald clapped his hat over his eyes because he couldn’t bear to see him shot. When the fusillade of bullets ended and the enemy scattered, Fitzgerald finally peeked and saw Washington, untouched, sitting proudly atop his horse, wreathed by eddying smoke. “Thank God, your Excellency is safe!â€
Ibid, p. 281.
 
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