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I am very new to actually trying CC. This past weekend while at Home Depot I did a self checkout of some light bulbs and a few other items. No issues. As I was walking out the door the shoplifting sensors you walk through set off for some reason. (no, I did not shoplift anything... :^) ) The attending cashier monitor waved me on no problem. But as this was my first time CCing a big box store like that, I was wondering was that related to my carrying, or just a coincidence?
 

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check your cloths and shoes they probably have a sensor on them.
 

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Likely the self checkout simply missed one ofnthe tags. Whatever it was, it definitely wasn't your firearm.
 

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The detectors are set off by an RFID tag that is attached to one of the items you purchased. It appears that you did not deactivate one of them when scanning them at the register.
 

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I've always suspected that the attendants at the door (e.g., at Wal-mart) can and do set off the alarm when they profile someone they want to look through someone's bag and check their receipt. I don't know if it happens or if I'm paranoid, but I'd be fascinated to know if it's true.
 

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I watch the watchers
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I know that if you activate a tone tracer -


that it will set off the security sensors at Rich's/Macy's, etc.
Funny to see people that suddenly break into a dead run as they walk through. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Adam5 said:
The detectors are set off by an RFID tag that is attached to one of the items you purchased.
It appears that you did not deactivate one of them when scanning them at the register.
It is not up to the purchaser to deactivate the security tags.
FYI- you have NO OBLIGATION to stop if the alarm sounds.

The cashier not deactivating the tag is not a problem of yours
and they cannot detain you. They do and they are guilty of
violating your civil rights.
They need more probable cause than the alarms to hold you
against your will.
... just keep on walking.
 

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EmergencyNrse said:
The cashier not deactivating the tag is not a problem of yours and they cannot detain you. They do and they are guilty of violating your civil rights.
They need more probable cause than the alarms to hold you against your will.
... just keep on walking.
Have you carefully researched Georgia law on this issue, or are you just giving an unsubstantiated opinion?
 

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As Bilbo, I mean Keepitreal fled, he heard Gollum cry, "Thief, thief, thief! Baggins! We hates it, we hates it, we hates it for ever!"

:lol:
 

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Malum Prohibitum said:
I see where their liabilities for false arrest/detainment are mitigated if they have probable cause to stop me as established by O.C.G.A. 51-7-60. However, I don't see what legal penalty I face for failing to yield to their arrest or detainment. My policy has always been not to stop, since I know I didn't do anything wrong. I consider it the responsibility of the store to ensure that their RFID or other theft deterrent systems are operating properly and not burden me with the inconvenience of validating these systems' operations.
 

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RedDawnTheMusical said:
Malum Prohibitum said:
I see where their liabilities for false arrest/detainment are mitigated if they have probable cause to stop me as established by O.C.G.A. 51-7-60. However, I don't see what legal penalty I face for failing to yield to their arrest or detainment. My policy has always been not to stop, since I know I didn't do anything wrong. I consider it the responsibility of the store to ensure that their RFID or other theft deterrent systems are operating properly and not burden me with the inconvenience of validating these systems' operations.
It does mean they are justified in blocking your car in and preventing you from leaving though. If nothing else they could detain you long enough for the police to show up whether you consented or not.
 

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ookoshi said:
RedDawnTheMusical said:
Malum Prohibitum said:
I see where their liabilities for false arrest/detainment are mitigated if they have probable cause to stop me as established by O.C.G.A. 51-7-60. However, I don't see what legal penalty I face for failing to yield to their arrest or detainment. My policy has always been not to stop, since I know I didn't do anything wrong. I consider it the responsibility of the store to ensure that their RFID or other theft deterrent systems are operating properly and not burden me with the inconvenience of validating these systems' operations.
It does mean they are justified in blocking your car in and preventing you from leaving though. If nothing else they could detain you long enough for the police to show up whether you consented or not.
Are you sure?
 

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ookoshi said:
It does mean they are justified in blocking your car in and preventing you from leaving though. If nothing else they could detain you long enough for the police to show up whether you consented or not.
That'll be the day. I would like to see it though; I usually take up three or four spaces with my F350 extended bed, extended cab dually, just in case some parks close on one side and I have trouble getting out...
 

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AEKDB said:
Are you sure?
Based on what I've read in OCGA § 51-7-60 and Mitchell v. Walmart Stores, Inc., it sure seems like it. But I am not a lawyer, so keep that in mind.

RedDawnTheMusical said:
That'll be the day. I would like to see it though; I usually take up three or four spaces with my F350 extended bed, extended cab dually, just in case some parks close on one side and I have trouble getting out...
They may not be successful, but it doesn't mean they can't try :).
 

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What's "reasonable" if you decide to resist physically and try to leave?
 

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In the case sub judice, assuming that defendant's agent was in fact gruff and rude as he forcibly halted her, it is nevertheless undisputed that this was done solely in response to the alarm of the antitheft device. Accordingly, probable cause was established for that forcible stop, and plaintiff's claims for false arrest are without merit.
 
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