Septic Tank issue

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by Archangel, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    OK, so this is my first experience with a septic issue. Anybody with experience / advice is appreciated.

    We had a basement toilet that ran all night and caused the septic tank to back up into our basement through the basement shower drain. The tank water has been stopped, and the waste water has gone back down the shower drain it came through (took about 10 minutes to drain the shower). The drain field is a swamp outside, but appears to be functioning. These are my questions:


    Do I need to have the septic tank pumped before anybody uses the water? If not, about how long should we wait?

    I have a call into a Septic Company that I picked at random (Baker's Complete Septic), waiting for a call back. In the meantime does anybody know a reputable company in Douglas County?



    Help...
     
  2. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    Septic pumping company is on the way. Decided to just git er done.
     

  3. jsaund22

    jsaund22 Ninjaneering Computers

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    Assuming your yard usually drains and drys out fairly well after a heavy rain, you should be fine. The job of the drain field is to keep the liquid level in the tank at what amounts to full. Since the water's gone back down in your shower that means that the drain field is working, it is just swamped. The only time you should have to pump a septic tank is if it is full of solids. The bacteria in the liquid help break down those solids, so you really want the liquid to stay.
     
  4. MewsicLovr

    MewsicLovr Member

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    I'd second what jsaund said. Sounds like the septic system did its job. I don't think pumping was necessary but if it helps your peace of mind then by all means.
     
  5. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup, tank has been pumped. When we bought the house they said the tank had never been serviced. (almost 17 years).

    They said (and I looked...eeww) it was almost full of solids.

    Now I have to call my insurance and see if they can help replacing the Pergo flooring in the rooms that flooded... :-(
     
  6. Scout706

    Scout706 Well-Known Member

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    10 years is the recommended interval.
     
  7. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah we were WAY past that.
     
  8. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Wither the insurance does or doesn't help I have a suggestion...

    ...Don't use a laminate in a basement.
     
  9. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    It was here when we bought the house...

    What would you suggest? I know I don't want carpeting, that be worse in a flooding situation. New to this home ownership / house stuff.
     
  10. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Using tile or other waterproof products such as vinyl, in/out carpet of even epoxy would beat the cheap laminate products. Some really good special effects can come out of concrete with acid stains then topped with clear epoxy. Epoxy coating will take many years of abuse and almost never wear out. Easy to clean because you just damp op and they're done. It sounds expensive but it really in line with other products. Then when you consider some of the problems that can arise in basement situations with porous products like laminate and carpet it makes a lot of sense. Tile would also be a much better choice than vinyl, carpet or laminate. It is water proof but the grout is a little harder to keep clean in a basement. There are also new vinyl plank options available and are much better than laminate or carpet or even sheet vinyl. It is a glue down product that if something happens to one or two pieces they can easily be replaced without tearing out the whole floor.
     
  11. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    THANKS! I'm going to look into this!

    The epoxy sounds interesting too, but one of the rooms is a bedroom and I'm not sure what the "cure" time would be on something like that.
     
  12. mog

    mog Active Member

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    Concrete stain/polish. There's some people doing some really beautiful work out there.
     
  13. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Cure time is 24 to 48 hours (varies by temp). Vent time could take an extra day depending on how well it's vented. I have had some done one day and was working in the building the next. Yes there was a strong odor but it had cleared out by end of the second day.

    Day 1 installation
    Day 2 cure out and vent
    Day 3 if needed vent.

    With good ventilation you could be sleeping in there end of second day without mid day on the 3rd day.

    http://www.concretecraft.com/stained-concrete/basement/
     
  14. jmorriss

    jmorriss Active Member

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    The problem with that in a living space scenario is that it will feel cold when walking on it.
     
  15. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    Not much else that is easy to clean up after flooding will feel warm on the feet.

    Throw rugs make good accessories that are easy on cleanup as well as the wallet. It might be worthwhile to pay attention to sound absorption when going to concrete or tile flooring.
     
  16. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah I am less concerned with warmth on the feet than I am with cleanup after an event like that. Just in case it ever happens again.

    Area rugs are easier to replace than flooring.
     
  17. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    And much less expensive!
     
  18. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    The epoxy coating doesn't echo as bad as drywall, plan concrete or tile. It also seals the concrete against ground moisture. Pet claws can't hurt it like they can other surfaces.
     
  19. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    I have 2 big dogs... I need to find out what kind of pricing I could be looking at.
     
  20. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Just get more than a couple of estimates.