roll of hay as backstop

Discussion in 'Firearm Related' started by gunsmoker, Sep 4, 2018.

  1. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    This gun-loving YouTuber, Demolition Ranch, has posted a video demonstrating that a big roll of hay (the kind you would find on an actual working farm)
    will stop any normal handgun or rifle bullet. But it won't stop the biggest ones -/the 338 Lappula magnum or the 50 BMG . It stops .223 and 7.62 x 39, though. And .45 FMJ from a 16" barreled carbine, .357 magnums from a pistol, and 12-gauge 1-oz. slugs.

     
  2. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Too bad a tracer will take it out.
     
    Phil1979 likes this.

  3. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    So don't shoot it with tracers.

    By the way if you did shoot it with tracers I don't know if it would actually catch the roll on fire because deep inside that roll where the bullet stops there will be very little oxygen to sustain the fire after the tracing compound burns out.
     
  4. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    this may be a good backstop as long as you don't have horses or livestock around,


    ... but a big animal could turn this back stop into a steaming pile of crap !
     
  5. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    First we don't know how deep into the hay the bullets went. I would bet they penetrated past the center and may have stopped within a few inches of the other side.
    Second as close as he was firing the tracer would have plenty of burn time to ignite the hay.
    Third it could draw just enough air through the hole to make the whole thing go up in a ball of fire and smoke.

    It only took one tracer to burn out the Sandy Springs gun range and it wasn't made from hay.
     
  6. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    I'll bet the floor and/or the backstop at Sandy Springs Gun Club had a lot more oxygen around it than the densely packed hay in the middle of 1500 pound roll that stopped those bullets.

    Oxygen an absolute requirement for a fire. It's non-negotiable. Although gunpowder, black powder, and other chemical compounds (like tracer bullet filler) contain an oxidizer,
    when that burns out, THEN whether the fire will sustain itself or smother and die out will depend on the availability of oxygen in there.

    During WWI and WWII, fighter pilots found out that shooting tracer rounds thru barrage balloons or airships rarely ignited them on the first machinegun burst (even if dozens of tracers hit the target) because concentrated hydrogen won't ignite if it's not mixed with oxygen or air (which is 20% oxygen). Gunners had to riddle the balloons with holes on the first pass, then wait a bit for the gas to leak out and form a trail in the air around the balloon, then on their second strafing pass, their tracers had good odds of igniting this hydrogen/air mixture just outside the skin of the balloon. That fire would then burn through the skin, causing a huge volume of flammable gas to mix with the air right at the spot where flames had already formed. Then the fireball would destroy the whole thing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  7. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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  8. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    431A6975-6C80-4043-B93A-148692D02EE5.jpeg P.S. I have several boxes of Vietnam war surplus 5.56 mm tracers. If you know anybody that's got a farm and is willing to risk losing a hay bale for an experiment in the name of science, we can arrange it .


    I'm all about experimenting over speculating. Several years ago Fallschirmjaeger and I experimented with 12 ga. flechette rounds to test their supposed extreme lethality. (We busted that myth!)
     
  9. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Maybe suggest the guy that did the hay test would be willing to shoot his and make a video.
     
  10. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    This. In the 70s I worked in Bellefontaine, OH (daily commute from Columbus). Farm country. I got invited to "make hay" one weekend. The grass had already been cut and allowed to dry. This guy used a round baler. Yeah, the bales are densely packed. The balers use belts and rollers to compress the hay. It's almost like how a kevlar vest is assembled. Layer on top of layer. The center is very tight so there's very little oxygen there.

    The video guy thought his role weighed about 400 lbs. It looked to be about 5' round so more like 1,000 lbs.
     
  11. jsaund22

    jsaund22 Ninjaneering Computers

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    They weigh around 1,200 pounds.

    Qualifications: Farm kid who's baled and moved thousands of square bales and quite a few round ones. Spent many an hour playing on, around, and between round bales of hay. Also worked for the local John Deere dealership and worked on quite a few of those balers as well.
     
  12. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    One weekend 40+ years ago and my estimate was a hell of a lot closer than his! :lol:
     
  13. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I know a guy who was paralyzed from the waist down when a bale of hay rolled over his tractor and him and bent him backwards over the seat, severing his spinal cord.

    They are heavy.

    As for the video, great entertainment, but I would never consider using one as my only backstop.
     
  14. NTA

    NTA Well-Known Member

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    I worked at an Eastman Chemicals (Kodak) plant in the early 80's. They spent a lot of money getting into the new super good plastic string replacement for bailing wire. Woops, the world went to the round hay bales around that same time.