Revolver grips

Discussion in 'Women with Firearms' started by gunsmoker, Dec 22, 2016.

  1. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    One bit of advice that everybody agrees on is this: When choosing a self-defense handgun, try several and see which one(s) fit your hand best.

    When it comes to semi-auto pistols, you can almost never modify how they feel. Polymer or plastic-framed semi-autos don't use any separate grips or stocks, and the metal-framed auto pistols that do use grip panels or stocks generally have only one size and shape. For the most popular semi-auto handgun in the world, the 1911, you can find "slim" grips, but that's an exception to the rule.
    For some semi-autos, you can put a giant rubber band around the grip frame, and such an overgrip may make the gun feel better to you, although I don't like the extra width they add.

    However, if you are looking at a popular revolver, you probably can find different shapes and sizes of grips. And colors, too. Black, wood-grain, or pink.
    The grips could be thick enough to cover the back of the gun's frame, or leave that exposed, and just cover the sides and front of the revolver's frame around the grip area.

    The grips could be long enough to give your pinky finger a place to rest (and help control the gun during recoil), or not. The tiniest of the "boot grips" for small-frame revolvers are great for concealment, and some of them feel OK when you dry-fire the gun, but most of them are NOT good choices for actually shooting live ammo at a target you want to hit.

    You can even get Crimson Trace laser-grips for some brands of handguns. Smith and Wesson, Charter Arms, and Taurus, I think.
    I sold a small-frame Rossi revolver (older production) just so that I could buy a S&W of the same style, so that I could but laser grips on it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  2. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    pics

    See the following pics, all of which are attached to the same kind of gun- a S&W J-frame .38 snub-nosed revolver. Some of these guns have exposed hammers, some have shrouded hammers, and some have concealed / internal hammers, but they're all the same basic design internally with identical grip frames, before the stocks (or grips) were replaced.
     

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