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http://www.thenewamerican.com/index.php ... n-violence
Another way is to price gun ownership outside the realm of possibility. Watch for proposals for insurance requirements for gun ownership which could place the cost of owning guns beyond the financial means of those who may need them the most for their self-defense: the poor.
Rep. Kenneth Dunkin’s bill seeks to amend the state’s Firearm Owners Identification Card Act to provides that any person who owns a firearm in the state maintain a $1 million or higher policy of liability insurance “specifically covering any damages resulting from negligent or willful acts involving the use of such firearm while it is owned by such person.â€
 

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“specifically covering any damages resulting from negligent or willful acts involving the use of such firearm while it is owned by such person.â€
Not to put too fine a point on it, but this goes nowhere if the insurance companies don't have/create policies for the above. I see two scenarios...

1. Only one "insurance company" steps up to the plate and offers anything. They'll be bankrupt and/or litigated out of the state in a year if they have to insure either case. You can win the lotto every time a "friend" "accidentally" shoots you. Split the proceeds 3 ways (self, lawyer, friend).

2. No insurance company is going to offer a policy and sues the state when they make it mandatory. It would be like forcing insurance companies to insure your house against any arson you might commit.

If the bill came out requiring honest accidental liability only policy then the risk is probably lower than motor vehicles or trampolines. If the rates are disproportionately higher than those examples, the law gets ruled unconstitutional on 2A grounds. Even if that doesn't happen, it won't take long for people to displace responsibility from the personal type to the "oh, it isn't my issue, you need to take that up with my insurance" kind of responsibility. That is *NOT* the consequence they have in mind with this bill either.
 

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can an insurance policy specifically cover intentionally hurting somebody else?
I thought that was against public policy, because the insurance company would be saying to the insured, "If you want to cause harm to somebody else, just keep in mind that we'll not only defend you but we'll even promise to pay any damages that you would otherwise have to pay yourself."
Public policy favors NO such passing the buck. If you intentionally hurt someone else, YOU pay for it, personally.
 
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