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Not the actual door material. Looking at protecting frame, etc. from a size 12 at the lockset.

Heavy solid core exterior doors all have locksets and deadbolts. Hinges are not exposed. Other than that, I really am looking for personal opinions that cut through the bs. Lots of it on the Net trying to sell you their product.

I am pretty handy, but, if we need to hire a craftsman, we'd consider doing it as well.

The door, mind you, is NOT the last line of defense.

Thanks in advance!
 

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I've been thinking about this a lot, as we bought an older home last spring. The best deadbolts and hinges aren't much help when the framing is inferior. I'm thinking about ripping everything out, and installing steel framing for starters. I'll be interested in following this thread. Thanks for the post.
 

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we have partnered with Lowe's for several years on supporting this particular product for victims who have already been burglarized.
Our Lowe's will offer a discount to anyone who comes in with a case number or a recommendation from the Sheriff's Office (see Commercial Sales during business hours) and they will also help with the install if needed.
(I can't and am not speaking for any other Lowe's or LE agency)
They will also offer discounts on other burglary prevention items as well (same conditions apply)
 

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I replaced the 1/2" hinge screws with 3-5" ones depending on glass features nearby, then added a 1/8"x5' stainless flat I had waterjet cut for the deadbolt and clash plate. I got a pair done for $100 total though I had about 20 minutes of work to do on each to clean up the edges and countersink.

On the lesser used back door, I sunk an eyebolt into the studs on either side of the door and installed a section of black pipe that was capped on one end and drilled for a cotter pin on the other.

I don't think it will stop everything, but it will require a quick determined effort to make enough noise to wake the dead while giving anybody inside enough time to fortify.
 

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I looked at the door jamb armor at Lowe's, but ultimately went with a strikemaster. Aside from the steel plates that reinforce the door jamb, it also includes longer screws to screw the hinge plates into the frame.

I made the decision because the door jamb armor requires removing door molding, and possibly cutting some nails or screws to install, whereas the strikemaster just screws right on, with 3" (I think) screws to go into the door frame.
 

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You cannot go wrong with door jam armor, that stuff really works. They will usually break the door before the break the door jam armor, even with a battering ram. You know, in case you don't pay your healthcare insurance fine for not having health insurance. :lol: Just kidding people.

Plan on not getting health insurance, fmlaw? :mrgreen:
 

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I built a safe room for a customer several years ago. I used 1/4'' X 5 1/2'' steel plate on the lock side and the hinge side secured to the 2X6 wood farming of the wall with 6'' screws. The jamb was built using 1/4'' ply over the steel just to cover it up and make it look nice. The door itself was a steel door (comercial) which was also inlaid with full height 1/4'' steel plate. Instead of drywall, 2 layers of 1/2'' hardy backer was used on both the outside and inside of the room. With the door closed it looked like a normal door.

To do something like this takes a lot of reworking of the wall framing. Most jambs are only 3/4'' thick and only about 3/4'' of wood is left to hold after the holes are drilled for the bolts of the locks to secure it. Also if you remove the lock sets from the door itself you will see there is only about 1/4'' of wood left of the door to keep people out. Securing that with a thin piece of metal doesn't really do much.

Now even if you do all of the above to the entries you still have the weak link of the windows to contend with. Also the locks are totally worthless to someone like me who knows how to open them reguardless of which brand or how expensive they are.
 

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The strikemaster is a good product, but since it doesn't reinforce the door itself over the knob/deadbolt, and it doesn't provide protection for the hinge side of the door, we recommend the Door Jam Armor product.
it does take a bit more time and tools for installation, but I have seen a LOT of door kicked in, and I have kicked in a few myself.....
 

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Door Jamb Armor:

Start looking at about 3:50 for the Police Battering Ram. You'll break the door before you break the door jam.

Put this in, and you'll never have to worry about the IRS kicking down your door when you don't pay your healthcare fine. The door jam armor is much cheaper than paying the fine anyway. :lol:

Could you imagine the look on this guy's face when he hits the door numerous times with a battering ram and it does nothing? :oops: Plus, it'll be pretty loud, so its likely to wake you up.

 

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I've been wondering about reinforcing doors as well. When doing some other work around the house it made me realize just how unsecure the front door looked. I haven't tried kicking it in, but it doesn't look like it'd be hard. Having read the reviews and watched the videos, I think I'll be installing some of these on my doors.
 

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SheriffOconee said:
Here at the Sheriff's Office we recommend this
http://www.lowes.com/pd_250639-87807-SE ... 26page%3D2

I installed this on my basement door and it's impressive. It took a couple hours only because there are many steps to the process.

One note -- I tried to order directly from the company and they told me to check at Lowes first. Lowes price was about 2/3 of the company's price (a $30-ish savings).
 

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SheriffOconee said:
The strikemaster is a good product, but since it doesn't reinforce the door itself over the knob/deadbolt, and it doesn't provide protection for the hinge side of the door, we recommend the Door Jam Armor product.
it does take a bit more time and tools for installation, but I have seen a LOT of door kicked in, and I have kicked in a few myself.....
So what happens when you guys come against someone who has installed one of these secure doors? :lol:

I know a few locales have made it illegal to fortify doors for exactly such reasons...
 

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Quality deadbolts are the first thing that you must install. A typical residential door knob can be bypassed in seconds with the correct tools (hammer or large pliers). Make sure that your deadbolt has a reinforcing sleeve that goes through the door inside the crossbore. Most cheap deadbolts sit on the face of the door and can easily be knocked off the door or out of the way enough to unlock the door.

Everyone else is on the right track with reinforcing the strike. I have installed many, many of these and they work fantastic

http://absolutesecurityproducts.com

and

http://www.doorsecuritypro.com

Don't forget to replace the hinge screws with longer screws on both leaves of the hinge. Interlocking hinges are available that are made with a locking tab on one leaf and a hole in the other leaf for thetab to lock into when the door is closed.

Door reinforcers (metal plates that wrap around the edge of the door and around the lock) help to keep the door from busting.

Don't forget hurricane film or security film for ground level windows to keep them from being shattered.
 

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These work amazingly well

http://www.amazon.com/Door-Security-Bar ... B0018S1I2M

Someone used to manufacture a similar bar in the 60's that mounted to the back of the door next to the lock and flipped down into a hole that you drilled into the floor. It was solid steel and impossible to bypass when installed properly. I think it was a New York Bar or something to that effect as it was used a lot in apartment buildings in the big cities.

http://www.nokey.com/orfoxstflmop.html

Not so much for french doors, something else that has been popular over the years is the Fox police Bar. It's easier to bust a hole in the wall next to the door.

On french doors I would recommend security film on the glass with long screws in the hinges and a good deadbolt. Don't forget to put longer screws in the strike plates where the verticle rods lock into the top of the frame and floor if you do not have one stationary door.
 
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