Questions regarding 1100 remington shotgun

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Sharky, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Okay.. I am in no way a gun expert but I need a bit of advice. I have been searching around the other forums and Remington site but did nto find many answers.

    My dad is letting me have his Remington 1100 12g classic trap. :) He has had it since the early 70's. We moved a few times and I would always open it up and look at it waiting for it to be passed on to me! Wooo hooooo finally!

    Here is the question part of my post. I know it has not been used for at least 30 years, however very nicely stored and is in mint condition. My dad didnt use it very much once I was born. He probably put a few hundred rounds through it.

    Do you guys think besides the obvious cleaning, lubrication, it should be brought to a gunsmith for a look over?

    Sorry to sound stupid, just dont have much experiance with shotguns.
     
  2. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    No gunsmith needed. But, besides a good cleaning and lube your going to need to replace the rubber o-rings that seal the gas system. Over years these with dry rot and need replacing. Get plenty if you plan to shoot it much, you'll wear em out and it bites to get caught without one when you need it.
     

  3. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Thanks USMC!

    Figured as much I will order some online. Definitely plan on shooting it a bunch!
     
  4. kkennett

    kkennett New Member

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    For what do you plan to use the gun? If you just plan to shoot clays with lead, then you'll be perfectly fine. If you're going to go waterfowl hunting or shooting upland birds in areas that require non-toxic shot, you might want to research whether a barrel from that generation can stand up to the punishment of steel shot, particularly if it has a tight fixed choke. Steel is a real joke for non-toxics, but stuff like Hevi-shot is more dense than lead and extremely hard. I would decidedly not use a barrel of that generation with those products. Of course, this advice is worth what you paid for it :wink:
     
  5. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    Very good points kkennet. If you do intend to use the gun for waterfowling and it has a fixed full choke you do have two other options. First, you could use Tungsten-Matrix. Tungsten-Matrix shot by Kent is slightly heavier than bismuth and close to the same density as lead. Almost as soft as lead, it too can be used in vintage guns. Pure tungsten has a gravimetric density of 16 gms/cc, so it is considerably heavier than lead, but that material alone is far too expensive to use in making shot. Tungsten starts out extremely hard, but when it is blended with just the right amount of plastic (or polymer, as it is commonly called), it becomes about as soft as lead and its density is lowered to close to that of lead.. I shoot it through an old double gun I have and it performs great and is easy on the barrels of an older gun. Your second option would be to buy a new modern 1100 barrel with screw in chokes that is rated for steel shot. In the long run that may be the cheaper option as Tungsten-Matrix shells can be a bit expensive compared to steel.
     
  6. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Thanks for both of your opinions I appreciate the help. I will be picking up the shotgun when I visit my parents in FL for thanksgiving. My father said it had a modified choke already, just not sure what kind. I will have to see it and then let you guys know more details when I have them.

    I plan on just shooting clays with it. I have never hunted before but wouldnt mind trying bird hunting. I would invest in a more modern model as mentioned if I deceided to.

    Thanks again for both of your input. I'm like a kid that had to wait till he grew up to play with dads toys! LOL :D
     
  7. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Okay need some help. Sorry to sound stupid but I dont have a hell of alot of experiance with Shotguns.

    We cleaned a good part of the gun. However the trigger plate assembly looks pretty dusty and I am thinking could use a bit of lube before shooting. I am gonna order the seals for for the barrel so I can bring it to the shoot in June. Not to mention getting some ammo.

    I have the manual for it, however a bit leary of taking apart the trigger assembly. Could one of you please help show me the proper way to take this thing apart so I can give it a good cleaning and possibly shoot it at the June get together? Just let me know what tools and lubrication I need to get and I will buy them and bring to the shoot.

    I just would hate to have to pay somebody to do it and then I still have no clue as how to do this myself!
     
  8. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    Sharky,
    I'll have everything we need with me. Be sure to bring your manual though. It's been a while since I've owned an 1100 and the mind may be as dusty as your trigger plate... :lol:
     
  9. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Thanks a ton USMC!!!!! Im like a kid right before XMAS!!!
     
  10. luke0927

    luke0927 New Member

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    Ive got an 1100 i got from my Papa that he got back a long time ago...its good gun but will only shoot 2 3/4" shells (at least mine does) so you may want something that will handle the 3" to 3 1/2" shells if your were to be waterfowl hunting
     
  11. Sharky

    Sharky New Member

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    Thanks for the info Luke.

    I have never been hunting of any kind. If so I would probably purchase another shotgun as this has one has pretty high sentimental value as being passed down to me.

    Mostly will pull this one for clays perhaps. Who knows. I just wantto get it working so when the old man comes up from FL I can take him out to shoot. His face lit up when he said " you have to shoot his thing, one round right after the other. There's no better feeling!"

    Guess you can tell he loved shotguns....:)