Public Gathering Prohibition - The Legacy of Camilla Massacr

Discussion in 'Places Off-Limits' started by Mike from Philly, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. Mike from Philly

    Mike from Philly New Member

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    The Public Gathering Prohibition – The Bloody Legacy of the Camilla Massacre


    The murderous events of a September day in 1868 continue to punish Georgians who violate the prohibition from possessing a firearm or knife at a “Public Gatheringâ€.

    In 1868, a newly elected General Assembly convened. There were 186 white legislators and 26 black legislators. They ratified the 14th Amendment to the US Constitution which granted citizenship to blacks and declared that no state was to deprive them of "life, liberty, or property." This action permitted Georgia’s readmission to the Union. Once Georgia was readmitted, the white members of the Georgia House of Representatives and Senate expelled the black members on the grounds that the state constitution did not recognize the right of black citizens to hold office.

    Following the expulsion, violence, and intimidation increased against Blacks and their Republican supporters. On September 19, 1868, several hundred blacks and Republicans marched 30 miles from Albany, Georgia to Camilla Georgia for a political rally in support of the removed black Legislators and presidential candidate Ulysses Grant. The Mitchell County Sheriff organized a heavily armed force to intercept the marchers and prevent the Republican rally from occurring. When the marchers arrived at the courthouse square in Camilla, the white residents opened fire, killing at least thirteen of the marchers and wounding nearly forty. As the retreating and wounded marchers returned to Albany, the hostile white residents pursued them with dogs and assaulted them for several days.

    The historical record is contradictory about whether the blacks were armed or not. The Bureau of Freedmen claimed that the marchers were unarmed. However, the Legislature’s “official account†claimed they were. This event has become known as the Camilla Massacre. Two years later in 1870, the General Assembly prohibited the possession of guns at “public gatheringsâ€. As defined by the Law, this prohibition would only apply to the marchers, not the Sheriff and white supremacist shooters. In addition, this law would have applied to the Civil Rights Marchers of the 1960’s. Since the Police and power establishment were all white, we can be sure the only Blacks were prosecuted under this law.
     
  2. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Professional Troll

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    The Public Gathering Language

    For any one interested, here is the original language of the Public Gathering law as it was passed by the racist legislature.

    Act of October 1870;

    No person in said state shall be permitted or allowed to carry about his or her person any dirk, Bowie-knife, pistol or revolver, or any kind of deadly weapon, to any court of justice of any election ground or precinct, or any place of public worship, or any other public gathering in this state, except militia muster grounds.
     

  3. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Professional Troll

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    State Court Cases

    Here is some more state court cases.

    www.guncite.com
     
  4. kkennett

    kkennett New Member

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    That is a sad spot in our history indeed.
     
  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Mike from Philly,

    What timing! As you know, I used your work in presenting the history of this Jim Crow legislation to the Federalist Society. Today, I had a conversation with a legislator about the Camilla massacre and the public gathering provision that is still in Georgia law and that no other state has. It was in interesting discussion.
     
  6. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    That's an interesting read. I was wondering where the public gathering law came from.
     
  7. foshizzle

    foshizzle New Member

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    What's interesting to me is that once you get something on the books, it tends to stay there. :cry:

    Mike from Philly had a handout on the history of GA's gun laws that he handed out at the meeting at Emory. It was good reading. Is it available online on the site? It was more in-depth than his post in this thread. I'm sure some people would find it interesting... it should be put up somewhere.

    First entry... 1833. Georgia enacts a law that provides, "it shall not be lawful for any free person of colour in this state, to own, use, or carry firearms of any description whatever"
     
  8. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    GCO is going to have a link soon called simply "Reading," which will have articles submitted by members and edited/reviewed by the board of directors.

    :soon:

    Mike has more than what you have seen so far . . . :wink:
     
  9. ber950

    ber950 Active Member

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    :bowdown:

    I like Mike
     
  10. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/camilla-history.php
     
  11. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/cam045.php
     
  12. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    From the Sheriff's Affidavit:

    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/cam012.php
     
  13. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Nobody was ever brought to justice.

    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/cam017.php
     
  14. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/cam006.php
     
  15. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/camilla/cam003.php
     
  16. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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  17. wsweeks2

    wsweeks2 New Member

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    :applause:
     
  18. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    If one takes his time and reads carefully each of the quotes posted above, it paints quite a picture.
     
  19. Rolan_Kraps

    Rolan_Kraps New Member

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    Wow, my wife is from Camilla and I'd never heard of this. Quite a story. Sad one at that, but Mitchell County has a long history of abuses by the police.