PTR 91 GI Classic vs. Century Arms C308 – 1st 40 rounds

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by rjinga, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. rjinga

    rjinga Member

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    My very first rifle was a Century Arms C308 called Black Betty (bam-ba-lam); I’ve owned her for about 1-1/2 years. My newest rifle is a PTR 91 GI Classic. I have had her for three days and she is still un-named. I took the PTR to the range yesterday and here are my initial impressions, compared to the C308, after 40 rounds:

    The most noticeable difference so far is the felt recoil. After my very 1st shot with the C308 I remember thinking “OK, this gun isn’t going to ‘fun’ to shoot.†At the end of that range trip, my shoulder was sore, and the next morning I had a butt pad shaped bruise to go with it. I installed a HK 21 butt pad, and that helped, but my shoulder would still get a little sore every time I shot the rifle.

    Yesterday, after the very 1st shot with the PTR, (with the HK 21 butt pad installed) I thought “Wow! I barely felt that.†It was just that slight “push†that I’d heard/read other people talk/write about. And, there is no soreness in my shoulder at all.

    The hand guard area of the PTR feels heavier than the C308 does. I’m assuming that’s because the PTR has a heavier/thicker barrel, but I don’t know that for sure.

    The fit of the PTR seems tighter than that of the C308.

    I like the sights on the PTR better than those on the C308 too. The PTR’s rear barrel sight adjusts for windage and elevation; you have to make those adjustments on the front sight of the C308. I’m also able to focus on the PTR’s flat blade front sight better than I could on the C308’s cone-shaped front sight.

    My first seven shots went like this: fire a shot, clean out the barrel (per the owner’s manual), fire the next shot and repeat the cleaning, etc. The manual called for 10 shots like that, but I ran out of cleaning pads after seven. I did have a 9x7†target at 25 yds just so I’d have something to aim at other than the berm 100 yds away. I did not take a photo of that target.

    Then I set a splatter target at 100 yds and fired the next 17 shots at it, off of a table rest with the open-top 100 yd rear sight. I’d fire three to five shots, try to spot them with my binoculars (and poor eyesight), make mostly elevation adjustments, and then walk out to verify, and place stickers over, the holes.

    [​IMG]

    I tried to cover the bulls-eye with the very top of the front blade, and my first set of shots was low. I think my three misses went under the target backer. Then I adjusted too much and when high. Then I adjusted again and was low, but closer. My last three shots are the circled splatters. I would have kept shooting and adjusting at 100 yds but it was getting close to closing time at the range.

    So, I put a Red Dawn target (the bunker) at 50 yds and shot the rest of the magazine, 16 rounds, at it mostly just for fun.

    [​IMG]

    The lower group of eight shots was taken with the top of the front blade covering the upper chest area of the target. The upper group of eight shots was taken with the top of the front blade covering the head area of the target.

    And here's a comparison between the C308 and the PTR (with one flyer excluded from each photo).

    [​IMG]
     
  2. zetor

    zetor Gaston beat up John

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    I've always shot better groups with pistols fitted with patridge sights than those fitted with fiber optic/quick acquisition style sights.
     

  3. Jmark

    Jmark Active Member

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    PTR makes the C308 uppers BTW, they're completed with surplus parts in the Century guns while PTR uses all new components. I'm pretty sure the C308 comes with a standard buffer, adding a heavy buffer will reduce felt recoil.