Professor threatens students who want to legally carry concealed weapons in class

Discussion in 'In the News' started by GoDores, Aug 25, 2018.

  1. GoDores

    GoDores Like a Boss

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    Professor threatens students who want to legally carry concealed weapons in class

    In a class about samurai history.
     
  2. atlsrt44

    atlsrt44 Well-Known Member

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  3. a_springfield

    a_springfield Well-Known Member

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    Or three and a samurai sword
     
  4. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Totally irrelevant that the good professor may be violating both school policy and state law.

    I wonder if the prof noticed the irony of teaching a course on the Japanese Samurai and his hoplophobia? :lol:
     
  5. dhaller

    dhaller Active Member

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    To be fair, I'm not seeing the "threat" part.

    Liberty works both ways - one person has the liberty (depending on location and circumstance) to carry, and another has the liberty to ask someone not to. I wouldn't carry a gun into someone's house if they asked me not to, for example - even if, legally, I could.

    It just looks like a request to me, not an order or a threat.

    (And for the record, samurai were courtiers and bureaucrats, not warriors (in practice), Hollywood version notwithstanding. Their swords were mostly badges of station, swords which were forbidden the average person. Kind of a leftist dream, actually!)

    DH
     
  6. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    Samurai ran the gamut from Lords and Generals to foot soldiers. They were indeed warriors and to carry such a sword one had to a) have the right, b) have the training, and c) adhere to a code. As for liberty working both ways, the professor took a job and paycheck from the State and has to abide by both its laws and the workplace rules - they forbid his behavior. He's violating the rules and it is ironic that he is teaching a class on those who followed the rules of Bushido. As for it being a mere request. Wow, have you read this piece works syllabus? No, or you would realize how many threatS (plural) are in it against carrying.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2018
  7. codegeek

    codegeek codegeek reincarnate

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    There is a professor at Kennesaw that has the same thing posted, some snowflake from Washington state
     
  8. GoDores

    GoDores Like a Boss

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    Did you read the whole “policy”? The professor is quite clear that if he learns in any way that any of his students is carrying (accidentally printing, someone else mentioning it, NRA sticker on a backpack, whatever) he will consider that a violation of the “concealed” policy, and will try to have any student who violates the policy in that or any other way both expelled and arrested.

    One would almost certainly be better off not taking his class anyway. I’d bet money it’s maybe 25% Japanese history and 75% leftist indoctrination, and any conservatives had better shut up and learn to fake it if they want a passing grade.

    The KU weapons policy is interesting. It requires one to carry without a round chambered, or with the hammer down on an empty cylinder for a revolver. I wonder if that’s compliant with state law or has ever been challenged.
     
  9. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    Unfortuantely, most of his "threats" seem to be backed by the policy. Unlike Georgia, I couldn't find where an exception was made for the momentary, accidental reveal of a firearm. That's like police pulling people over for going 26 in a 25mph school zone, it'd be 100% legal, if a bit of a jerk move.
     
  10. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    An NRA sticker or even answering yes to the question if you're carrying would not violate state law regarding concealing.
     
  11. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    In this case it's not the professor's house. It's the state's house and the state sets the rules.
     
    Wheedle likes this.