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I watch the watchers
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I took my German driving license test in English and yet managed to dive on roads with German, Swiss, Italian, Austrian, Belgian, Dutch, and French language signs.

Making it easier for people to understand the question in no way diminishes their safety, or that of others, on the road.

As for the cost... The translations are fairly simple and setting up new printing isn't going to bankrupt the state if the tests are phased in. That said, it should be up to the countries requesting tests in other languages to fund things.
ETA Add Japan, Korea and the Republic of Panama to the list of countries where I don't speaka da language but was able to drive without much problems. (Those problems were mostly caused by local custom, not by weird laws :) ).
 

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Deplorable bitter clinger.
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Wait, what? Here in Georgia, the traffic signs are all in English, right? These people who get a driver's license are supposed to be functioning citizens in our state, or at least, legal residents, I would assume. They need to function in the language that is used here.
 
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Deplorable bitter clinger.
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That's just insane.

9 years, guys...
 

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I watch the watchers
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Wait, what? Here in Georgia, the traffic signs are all in English, right? These people who get a driver's license are supposed to be functioning citizens in our state, or at least, legal residents, I would assume. They need to function in the language that is used here.
Pardon, but are you saying that visitors from say... Germany, driving on an international license shouldn't be allowed to rent and drive automobiles in Georgia because they are neither citizens or legal residents of Georgia?

Facility with language has little with the ability to drive compared to a knowledge of the "Rules of the Road". Fortunately those are about 99.4% the same in all developed countries.
 

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Deplorable bitter clinger.
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I was referring to the OP, driver's license testing in other languages here in GA. I don't object to visitors from Germany or any other countries who rent and drive here, as long as they can do so safely.
 

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I don't either, but I also don't object to driving license tests being made easier to understand by being printed in someone's first language. The costs are minimal.
There's what 20-30 questions on the test? That's laughable compared to the 300 or so in a German license test.

Here's Question 16 on the Georgia Driver's Practice Test:

Question #16
What law became effective January 1, 2007 that implemented new legislation to promote increased teen driving safety?
  1. Jordan's Law.
  2. Joshua's Law.
  3. Jacob's Law.
How in heck does knowing the frackin' name of the law make someone a safer driver than knowing that the law is?

Our tests are a pitiful excuse designed to get as many people on the road as possible, even at the expense of the public safety.
 

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Deplorable bitter clinger.
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I wouldn't try to argue with you about the quality of driver's license testing. But I do think it is unnecessary for the testing to be in any other language, than what is widely spoken and read in this country.
 

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I'm not sure I agree with the concept of forcing someone to become proficient in English before they can apply for a driving license.
I made it through 3 years in Japan and could barely ask for water in a restaurant but could navigate the streets and obey the rules of the road with no problems. Same with Germany.

It's a convenience, and helps to ensure that the test takers understand the questions they are being faced with. I see no problems with that.

I guess my objection to not having the test questions translated into multiple languages could be summed up thus -
"Is there a drawback to making the test questions more easily understood by people who do not speak English as their primary language?"
 

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Just wait they are going to want ballots to be in every language so people that don't speak English can vote in an election that they have no idea about the candidates platform.
 

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Deplorable bitter clinger.
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Just wait they are going to want ballots to be in every language so people that don't speak English can vote in an election that they have no idea about the candidates platform.
Citizens can now vote in GA elections, right now, even if they can't read or write or speak English. I have been an election observer and have seen this: older parents who are allowed to go into the voting booth with a son or daughter who can then translate for them and help them vote. You read that right, a naturalized citizen who cannot read and write English but who can vote.

Falls asked why I think it's a bad idea for driver's license testing, and other state and federal forms to be printed in other languages. Because, it leads to nonsense like my example. A nation isn't a nation if we can't agree on a common language, and if we fail to require citizens (not visitors who rent or drive for a limited time) to read and write that language.
 

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Speaking of illiterates, I was setting up an estate account for my late mother's estate last week the lady at the bank told me I'd be surprised at the people around here who still sign their names with an "X".
 

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Errr... the United States doesn't Have any 'official language', nor does it require any citizen to speak any 'common language'.

On the other hand, Germany Does have an official language ...
It also administers its driving test in 12 different languages: German, English, French, Greek, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Croatian, Spanish, Turkish and Arabic (only in some federal states).

Perhaps it is possible for a country to be a country and still serve the needs and desires of the people living there; citizens or not.

ETA: I don't think you can say "A leads to B" is anything more than a hypothesis when there are concrete example of A NOT leading to B.
 

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Errr... the United States doesn't Have any 'official language', nor does it require any citizen to speak any 'common language'.
Not directly related to drivers licenses but eligibility for US naturalization requires a basic command of the English language to include reading, writing and speaking. Maybe we should have an official language.
 

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Here's Question 16 on the Georgia Driver's Practice Test:

Question #16
What law became effective January 1, 2007 that implemented new legislation to promote increased teen driving safety?
  1. Jordan's Law.
  2. Joshua's Law.
  3. Jacob's Law.
How in heck does knowing the frackin' name of the law make someone a safer driver than knowing that the law is?

Our tests are a pitiful excuse designed to get as many people on the road as possible, even at the expense of the public safety.
That is both stupid and yet unsurprising. I was in NJ for 13 months and had to get a local driver's license there. At the time, instead of like every state I had been in where you just hand over your old out-of-state license and get the new local license, you had to take the written exam. I took it and failed because of stupid questions like and one's like "who is the current secterary of transportation for the State of NJ" and "what is the New Jersey statute number for the law governing what documents are required for suitable proof of identity to get your New Jersey driver's license?"

As far as having the test in different languages, I support that - particularly if you're asking stupid questions like those above. The sooner someone is able to get a license, the quicker they can get around, get a job, and interact with society more, allowing them to learn English (or the Southern version of it anyway) quicker.
 

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Errr... the United States doesn't Have any 'official language', nor does it require any citizen to speak any 'common language'.
And it's too bad we don't. My concern is that this polarized society of separate enclaves of different languages being spoken, and a government that facilitates this, is bad for a unified, cohesive nation. What do we have in common any more, if not our language? And, if someone never speaks English in the U.S., they are destined for third class status always. Why would we set people up for that failure? I just think it's a bad idea. I am sorry that some are inconvenienced by not having their language on driver's license forms.
 
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