Personal Impressions of the Glock 43

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by rjinga, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. rjinga

    rjinga Member

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    I really wanted to like shooting this gun. I liked the size and the weight. I liked the feel of it in my hands. I even liked the “ball in the bucket” sights. However it seems that the gun didn’t like my strong hand.


    I took my son’s Glock 43 to my local indoor range this afternoon and put over 50 rounds through it. When shooting right-handed, with either a single or double-handed grip, with both eyes open, and just my right eye open, the rounds were consistently hitting low and slightly to the left.


    For example, at three yards, right-handed, with the ball in the bucket and held right between the target’s eyes, the rounds would strike the target’s right cheek. However, when I switched to my left hand, the shots were right on the money (or in this particular case, right between the eyes). Also, after just a few shots, the trigger started irritating my right index finger. However, it didn’t bother my left index finger.


    If I was a left-handed shooter, I might be shopping for my own 43 right now. But, I’m not, so I guess I’ll stick with my Sig P229 as my EDC for a while longer.
     
  2. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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    My experience is similar. Low left.
     

  3. Glockenator

    Glockenator Active Member

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    Little guns aren't very tolerant of minor technique errors. My daughter was having a hard time grouping with my 43. But she hasn't shot much in a long time, so it will take her a while to get in the groove. If you are grouping, this chart is a great help in identifying technique errors:

    Shooting chart.jpg

    The trigger finger irritation gets me on every Glock, but it is an easy fix. Just take down the trigger safety until it is flush with the face of the trigger. A little bit at a time with sandpaper wrapped around a dowel, using an X-Acto as a scraper, or a Dremel with a sanding drum. If you are handy, that is.
     
  4. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    I do the same with Glocks. I believe that it is a function of the grip angle and the trigger mechanics as I'm more used to a 1911. I'm sure if I shot Glock more consistently I could correct this, but I'd rather keep shooting my 1911 pistols, Sig P320, etc.
     
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  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    My wife's Shield drives them right in where they are supposed to go. I am surprised to see two shooters (the first two posters) with such good gun skills having trouble.
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    :eek: Maybe I misunderstand, but what are you going to push on to deactivate the trigger safety of you grind it off flush to the trigger? :confused:
     
  7. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    From what I had read online, there were some issues with some of the Shields. Some people had bad barrels and sent them back to M&P. The returned Shields worked just fine. Other's are just fine out of the box, although a lot of people seem to get trigger jobs done on them. The Shield we shot definitely had issues. The issues weren't major, but it was producing significantly larger groupings than similar size and same-caliber firearms we were shooting with the same exact range ammo.

    The owner of the Shield we had (new, out-of-the-box) didn't want to deal with it, so he sold it to his brother, his brother had the trigger modified/replaced and had the barrel replaced by a gunsmith. It shoots very nice now. I don't know what the issue was, but it is a great shooter now.
     
  8. Glockenator

    Glockenator Active Member

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    All Glock trigger safeties stick out a little too far when activated. That is by design, so that they are sure to always work. That causes irritation to the trigger finger.

    You sand it down so that it is flush with the trigger face when activated, instead of standing proud of the trigger face. You do this by removing the trigger, and engaging the trigger safety while sanding it down until it is no longer standing proud. Then slightly round the sharp edge you just created, to deburr it.

    You don't just grind it off until it is flush when not activated. Then it wouldn't work at all. I should have clarified that when I mentioned it.
     
  9. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    That makes a LOT more sense. :grin:
     
  10. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    I'll stick with my PPS with paddles. Ultra reliable with great groupings and a descent trigger.
     
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