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Do you carry with a round in the chamber, and, if so, has it ever fired accidentally?

  • I never carry a round in the chamber.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I carry a round in the chamber, and it has never fired accidentally.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I carry a round in the chamber, and it has fired accidentally on one occassion.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I carry a round in the chamber, and it fires accidentally every now and then.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I carry a round in the chamber, and it fires accidentally on a regular basis.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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I have always tended to agree that there was no such thing as an "accidental" discharge, until my son had a round fire while dropping the slide on his Bersa 95 (prior model to the Thunder 380). He bought the gun used and had it checked by a gunsmith before beginning to carry it. Was cleaning it one night (at my house) and upon completion, reloaded the magazine and dropped the slide only to be greeted by a BAM (VERY LOUD in a closed room). Turns out the trigger spring had broken with the trigger in the forward position. Had he pulled the trigger prior to reloading, he would have immediately found the broken spring, but was being careful to stay away from the trigger. Since he religiously follows the Four Rules, there was no harm - no foul, just a hole in the carpet. Our 'smith said the only "accidental discharges" are when something breaks, and to remember that things do break-usually at the worst possible times.

As an aside, he sent the gun to Bersa and they completely rebuilt the gun for no charge, not even shipping. It hasn't had a hiccup since.
 

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tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
Malum Prohibitum said:
Maybe the poll should be edited to state the adverb "negligently" in substitution of "accidently" and then include a category for weapons that fire all by themselves with no input from the owner.
Yeah, this one time my Glock got so excited that is just fired while inside of my holster. It was the craziest thing. To be fair, it was looking at a sexy little Glock 26.
would that be premature discharge??
Only in the eyes of the 26! :D
 

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Rammstein said:
tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
Malum Prohibitum said:
Maybe the poll should be edited to state the adverb "negligently" in substitution of "accidently" and then include a category for weapons that fire all by themselves with no input from the owner.
Yeah, this one time my Glock got so excited that is just fired while inside of my holster. It was the craziest thing. To be fair, it was looking at a sexy little Glock 26.
would that be premature discharge??
Only in the eyes of the 26! :D
i bet the 26 was disapointed.
 

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jason1 said:
I have seen one of the sales guys at bulleyemarksman in cumming accidental discharge a 22 rifle in the showroom in the ceiling when he was taking the 22 rifle apart to be cleaned.So be careful when cleaning guys always check the chamber. For me I don't keep one in the chamber for that reason when I carry my Glock with no safety I keep ammo in the clip unlike my Makarov which I keep hot and ready for action.So you some people think of safety first before chambering the weapon.

There is no such thing as an "accident". Everything has a cause. And almost 100% of the time, it's a stupid human cause.

Once in a very great while, you really can blame it on the dog........


.
 

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tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
Malum Prohibitum said:
Maybe the poll should be edited to state the adverb "negligently" in substitution of "accidently" and then include a category for weapons that fire all by themselves with no input from the owner.
Yeah, this one time my Glock got so excited that is just fired while inside of my holster. It was the craziest thing. To be fair, it was looking at a sexy little Glock 26.
would that be premature discharge??
Only in the eyes of the 26! :D
i bet the 26 was disappointed.
The 19 didn't care. It went home to take a nap in the safe.
 

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Rammstein said:
tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
tony218 said:
Rammstein said:
[quote="Malum Prohibitum":3ro9vd3p]Maybe the poll should be edited to state the adverb "negligently" in substitution of "accidently" and then include a category for weapons that fire all by themselves with no input from the owner.
Yeah, this one time my Glock got so excited that is just fired while inside of my holster. It was the craziest thing. To be fair, it was looking at a sexy little Glock 26.
would that be premature discharge??
Only in the eyes of the 26! :D
i bet the 26 was disappointed.
The 19 didn't care. It went home to take a nap in the safe.[/quote:3ro9vd3p]

that's just like a 19
 

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I have an issue carrying one in the chamber with my Glock 30. It's some sort of mental block. It simply worries me because there is no external safety. Now before every one rips me apart, I have on occassion carried my Glock with one in the pipe. And if I carry one of my other handguns that has a grip safety or other external safety, I keep one ready to go. I love my Glock, but the lack of a grip safety has always bother me (maybe that's why the XD has caught me eye). The fact that I also use an IWB holster on the front of my body also plays a role in my fear. :wink:
 

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mzmtg said:
jason1 said:
I have seen one of the sales guys at bulleyemarksman in cumming accidental discharge a 22 rifle in the showroom in the ceiling when he was taking the 22 rifle apart to be cleaned.
That wasn't an accident. That was negligence.

Thakfully he had the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, so no one got hurt.

An "accidental discharge" (AD) happens when the gun itself malfunctions in some way. Any time the person holding the gun malfunctions, causing it to fire, it's a "Negligent discharge" (ND).

Unless you're a cop, then it's still an AD. Cops don't have NDs, they're professional enough.
Back in my safety investigator/engineer days, I learned there's no such thing as an "accident" because "accidents' just happen. Not true! Everydamnthing has a cause. Almost always a human cause...

Guns don't shoot themselves. I've never heard of a rifle, pistol, cannon or whatever going off without human intervention.

If something shoots when it shouldn't, it's not an accident, it's negligence on someone's part.

If it truly is a discharge due to a gun malfunction, then it's still negligence. Negligence that should be blamed on the person who didn't load or clean it properly, or the person who didn't assemble it properly or the person who didn't design it properly.

But, it's still human error, not an "accident".

OK, I'll get off now...
:soapbox:

.
 

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I just try to follow the 4 rules and hope that if I ever have a brain fart or mechanical failure that the bullet lodges safely in the dirt.

Of course, every pistol I carry has one in the chamber. I have never personally experienced an ND. I heard about plenty in the Marine Corps but luckily I wasn't close enough to experience one first-hand. Coincidentally, I was in one of the first groups allowed to use the MK19 in MCT after an investigation into why one less than dilligent SSgt allowed a PFC to fire another 40mm into a squib 40mm. Both died as well as one spectator. To this day that's why I always try to see light on the lands and grooves from my end when I clear any weapon.

I also keep most of the guns in my safe loaded. Not one in the chamber but a loaded mag. The loaded AK under the bed is probably overkill but I don't have any kids, so why not.
 

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foshizzle- I belive the word is not squib. The grenade for the MK19 is an Ojive. And what you discribed is a "fire out of battery". I've had that happen to me when I was on the range in ITB. I'm a Machine Gunner by trade if you can't tell already. We simply got told to lower my our heads down, while the instructors used the "round removal tool" to slowly push the round out the barrel. Good times!

Oh and I know that I previously stated there are no AD's only ND's. But, there are when dealing with "Machine Guns" example of an accedental discharge that isn't the operators falt is a hang fire or cook off.

Wiki's Defintion of Hang fire- The term hang fire refers to a state in which an unexpected delay is encountered between a firearm being triggered and the initiation of the propellant. This mode of failure was common in firearm actions which relied upon open primer pans, due to poor/inconsistent quality powder. Modern weapons are susceptible, particularly where the ammunition has been stored in an environment outside of the design specification. The delay is typically too small to be noticed, but may be disruptive in processes where accurate timing is important

Couldn't find Cook Off. But it is when the barrel is so hot it causes the powder to ignite. This probobly wouldn't happen in a civilian firearm. It simply doesn't shoot the amount of rounds necessary to heat up the barrel to the point that it would happen.

Both of these occur with Machine Guns. I've had them both happen when I've been present at a range. Both ususally aren't a big deal because you train with those possiblilitys in mind. And as long as you keep the barrel down range it's no big deal.

I think I've described these before in this forum :wink: And I know it's not an "Accident" because human error is built in somewhere in what happened. But, it is an accident to the man operating the firearm. But, that's the nature of the beast. Sh!t happen's.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
There were two people who selected "I carry a round in the chamber, and it has fired accidentally on one occassion."

Two stories of negligent discharge have been related: Jason1 wrote about someone else who was cleaning his 22 when it went off. That seems more like inexcusable negligence than what I was getting at, and besides, the question was in regard to the manner in which one carries his firearm.

Dadx4's story is definitely unsettling, but it, too, was not about carrying.

I think the question and answers could have been better worded, but I'm guessing that neither dadx4 nor jason1 were the ones who selected "I carry a round in the chamber, and it has fired accidentally on one occassion."

(BTW, I'm not complaining about Dadx4 and Jason1's stories. I found them very helpful and interesting. I'm just trying to get to the bottom of the question I was curious about.)

So, am I right? And, if so, which two board members have experienced an ND/AD while carrying (i.e., while holstering, unholstering or carrying holstered)? I'm eager to learn about the circumstances.

Like I said, I think I worded the options a bit poorly, so maybe people just didn't know what I was driving at...
 

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My Mom still asked when ever I am back home visiting.

That and "do you have the safety on?" At first I said "no, because there are three internal safeties...blah blah blah" And she was like :shock:

Now I just say "yes, in fact there are three safeties engaged right now." Which is met with a "good."
 

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jccls...

I don't THINK I was one of the two who said they had a ND, but - admitting to a "senior moment" - I really don't remember :oops:

If I did answer that way, I was thinking of my son's experience. He does carry that way and was preparing to re-holster his Bersa when the event happened.

I keep a round in the chamber, but have never personally had an accidental or negligent discharge, and pray that I never do.

(reminder to self -"Remember the four rules!")
 

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jmorin,

I personally chose to carry with a round in the chamber, but if you don't I won't flame you over it. I'm a firm believer that everyone should do what they are comfortable with. What's best for one person may not be what's best for another. I feel that if you aren't comfortable carrying a Glock with one in the pipe, you shouldn't do it. Being nervous carrying that way could cause a ND while handling it. I used to not carry with a round chambered. I read a post on Glock Talk where someone said to carry on an empty chamber for 30 days with the trigger in the foward (ready to fire) positon. See how many times you find that you pulled the trigger back. That number will probably be 0. Then see if you feel better about carrying chambered.

But again, don't do it if you makes you feel uncomfortable.
 
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