nuclear power stations are off limits

Discussion in 'Places Off-Limits' started by Gunstar1, Sep 20, 2006.

  1. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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  2. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Our list is getting longer . . . and its a felony.
     

  3. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Active Member

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    While I am not opposed to this law, I am somewhat startled on how it "Sneaked" its way through the legislature. If this could be ushered through being undetected, imagine what other law could be done the same way.... not like this is a new tactic to lawmakers anyway...

    Anyway, it look as if it's only a crime to have it in the facility. I supposed keeping it locked in the car would be ok. Like GAgunowner says this most likely wont affect anyone. There are only 2 nuclear plants in Georgia. One is in Baxley, GA and the other is near Augusta.

    here is the bill that spawned this law.

    SB532
     
  4. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Active Member

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    Why no affirmative defense???

    At the very least, an "Affirmative Defense" clause should have been added to this law.

    Something along the lines of this...

    O.C.G.A. 16-11-127.2 Carrying or possessing a weapon while on the premises of a nuclear power facility....

    (d)
    It shall be an affirmative defense to a violation of this Code section if a person notifies a law enforcement officer or security officer employed to provide security for a nuclear power facility of the presence of such item as soon as possible after learning of its presence and surrenders or secures such item as directed by the law enforcement officer or security officer employed to provide security for a nuclear power facility.
     
  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, I am opposed to it. While I understand the law was probably motivated by the made for TV movie around the time this was being dreamed up . . . there are other ways to keep items out of an area than passing a criminal law.

    Are these private property? Problem solved.

    As for the felony portion, well, was it not already a crime to enter a building with the intent to commit bodily harm or commit a felony? Ah, yes, "burglary." Also a felony. So, was this anything other than a "feel good" law?
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Did anybody else notice this?

    Chapter 3 of Title 35 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, is amended by inserting a new subsection (d.4) in Code Section 35-3-34, relating to the disclosure and dissemination of criminal records to private persons and businesses, to read as follows:
    "(d.4) The center shall place a high priority on inquiries from any nuclear power facility requesting a criminal history and shall respond to such requests as expeditiously as possible, but in no event shall a response be made more than two business days following receipt of the request."



    So - probate courts - six months or more (50 days to return the background check that is "instant" and whenever to issue the license, since 60 days means squat) and nuclear facilities - two days.

    :rant:
     
  7. mzmtg

    mzmtg Active Member

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    I got fingerprinted at the airport for a security badge on Wednesday. It only takes a few days for the FBI to turn that around...

    So let's see:
    FBI can turn fingerprint record checks in less than a week
    NICS check is damn near instantaneous in a gun store
    Probate judges have a GCIC terminal right in their office

    So why does it take 6 months to turn around a GFL app?
     
  8. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, they are. The Southern Company owns all of the nuclear facilities in Georgia, and they can keep out anything they want and install metal detectors and basically do anything for security as a condition of entering the facility or property.

    No shirt, no shoes, no service.

    This law is absolutely unnecessary.
     
  9. CrankE

    CrankE New Member

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    From the horse's mouth.

    I used to work at Plant Hatch in Baxley and it always galled me that we, as employees couldn't keep a gun locked up in the car/truck. After 9-11, the company policy became no guns period. Yet to get to anything that matters (and this is true at any nuclear plant), you'd have to go through numerous layers of search and scan. The chances of you sneaking a gun through are almost zero.

    Employees have to go through a full background screening to obtain unescorted access privileges anyway. I would guess that it's comparable to getting a GFL. Yet, not a shred of trust for the employees-only additional suspicion.

    What Georgia has done is to criminalize something that was previously just a matter of company policy (except for the people who aren't employed there). Further, the Legislature has ensured that any protections that they might extend to employees who may keep a firearm in their locked vehicle will not be extended to nuclear plant employees.

    Sorry guys, you don't get any second amendment rights. Hope nobody tries to rob you on the way home.

    In the not so distant past, I noted that a plant employee was indeed robbed on the side of the road after stopping to help someone. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that the entire population out there is disarmed as they travel to Vidalia or Baxley.

    I also seem to recall a previous incident at another nuclear plant (not in Georgia) where a guy was applying for a job and they discovered a loaded weapon under the seat during a random search. I haven't looked, but the applicable CFRs for nuclear plants may already say something about this.

    What a waste of time/money this law is.