NRA Pistol Instructor Certification

Discussion in 'Training' started by Desler, Aug 24, 2016.

  1. Desler

    Desler New Member

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    I looked on the NRA Instructor's site for the 2 day, hands on, Pistol Instructor Certification classes and all I can find are a couple in either Stone Mountain or Buford. Anyone know of any on the west side of town, Cobb County possibly?

    Thanks
     
  2. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    I received my certification from a member here (or at least he used to be):
    John Weeks
    Applied Tactical Concepts, LLC
    1 Townsley Drive
    Suite 2B
    Cartersville, Georgia 30120
     

  3. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Most trainers have dropped out of the instructor training. The choices have become very limited as you noted. It has become expensive to take any course from the NRA. the NRA charges $60 for the phase 1 of the basic pistol shooting course and you have to pass the exam with a 90+. You have to do this before enrolling in an instructor class. The price for the instructor class ranges from $225 up to $350 depending on the instructor. Just to take the full basic pistol shooting course (Phase I and Phase II) cost $60 - Phase I + $125 (and up) for Phase 2. We use to charge $125 for the full course until the NRA decided to use what they call a blended course. They took a small part of the class segment away from the instructors and now have it on line. It leaves the instructors still having 5 to 6 hours left to teach out of the 8 it used to take. The same course now cost 50% more than it did prior to May 15 2016. It's harder to find people willing to pay for the Basic Pistol class now. Before you take any instructor class you need to get your reason in order. If you think you will make a lot of money doing it a second guess will be in order. People are just not knocking down the door to take the classes like they use to.
     
  4. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    I don't have a solution, but I see the following problem:

    Too few gun owners that need training are getting it. A very tiny minority of gun owners have good and safe (and effective) gun handling skills. They're fully competent to operate their firearms under the stress of a self-defense situation. They're competent either because they had training in the past, or learned on their own, or had informal instruction from their parents, older siblings, and more experienced friends who helped introduce them to guns.

    A great majority of gun owners have deficient gun handling skills, both as to safety and as to marksmanship. Yet, they are unwilling to spend the time and money needed to improve in these areas.

    :(



    What's the answer?
     
  5. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    The answer is one that most here, and many instructors (including myself) would not agree with.

    "Required Training"

    Yes I typed a bad word on a public forum. Maybe I will not be banned for it. The way I see it this would only help with the problem of those seeking a carry license with little or no firearm experience. Not the everyday mom and pop that keeps it in the drawer next to the bed. I have seen a couple of people with a carry license come through my class that did not know how to release the slide when the mag was empty. They dropped the mag, then pulled the slide and released to get it to close. This kind is walking around us with a license to carry. I also had one that had a carry license but did not own a gun nor had never owned a gun. The answer to my question was "I did not want to go through the background check." :faint: At least she took the class before getting a gun.
     
  6. Scott 40s&w

    Scott 40s&w Member

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    Contact me thru the website below and I'll answer your Questions. The changes that were made have definitely changed the NRA course but it is still good training. There are other ways to train people in the proper safe use of a firearm. 770 Three 77 one six 35.
     
  7. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Is anyone in possession of any more information on this being changed back yet. Has the NRA made the right choice?
     
  8. Scott 40s&w

    Scott 40s&w Member

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    Nothing official has been released
     
  9. GeorgeShootaire

    GeorgeShootaire Site Supporter

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    Matt Schwab at Georgia Outdoor in Stone Mountain still a very good choice if you want to follow the course outline as NRA intended.... good luck.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
  10. Scott 40s&w

    Scott 40s&w Member

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    NRA Instructor training update.
    As of today and subject to change the NRA instructor training is as follows.
    Instructor candidates must take the Instructor lead training course before taking Basic Instructor training and the Handgun Instructor course.
    The blending learning course is still available for those that prefer that style of training.
    The First steps class no longer exist. An Instructor can teach an action specific class if they so choose. like a revolver only class.

    Good luck
     
  11. rankhornjp

    rankhornjp New Member

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    Off topic, but....


    What's wrong with this?
     
  12. Taurus92

    Taurus92 Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to drop the magazine to release the slide lock. IOW, they were not familiar with their weapon, but OTOH, that's why people take classes. Kind of the point of taking classes actually, so I'm not sure why an instructor would be surprised.
     
  13. rankhornjp

    rankhornjp New Member

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    I always drop the mag before I send the slide home. I don't see the reason/logic to dropping the slide on a gun with an empty mag.

    I also don't use the slide lock (its not called a slide release) to release the slide, I use the sling shot method, because its the same as clearing a malfunction. Muscle memory and all that.

    I guess that I'm one of "This kind is walking around us with a license to carry."

    Maybe someone can enlighten me to why I'm wrong.
     
  14. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    https://youtu.be/8LmjakoWKwU
     
  15. Taurus92

    Taurus92 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I think the point was not knowing there were other options vs. choosing which method is best for you as mentioned in this video.
    Again though, people go to training to learn things like there are different methods and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
     
  16. GeorgeShootaire

    GeorgeShootaire Site Supporter

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    Knowing the condition of the firearm and that it ran dry and what to do next, that's how I read it. Plus on a cold range you do always want them to remove the mag, clear the chamber THEN let the slide forward. All of this made perfect sense to me in their post, the way I read it. Have seen way too many people slip a round into the chamber from magazine they thought was empty.

    I also call it the slide lock-lever-release interchangeably. If it wasn't a release they wouldn't make it external. I'm more worried about how they use the controls than what they call them. Especially due to some cop training programs and firearms makers in the 80s or 90s pushing a single term. Yes, I'm that old :)
     
  17. rankhornjp

    rankhornjp New Member

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  18. rankhornjp

    rankhornjp New Member

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    This is what was written.

    "I have seen a couple of people with a carry license come through my class that did not know how to release the slide when the mag was empty. They dropped the mag, then pulled the slide and released to get it to close. This kind is walking around us with a license to carry."

    Which, for me, is the preferred way of clearing a firearm. The way Wegahe wrote it, implies that he thinks people like me don't know what they are doing and shouldn't be carrying a gun in public. Maybe Wegahe will drop back in to clarify what he meant.


    Why do I like that method? It's the same motion regardless of what I'm trying to do.

    Empty gun: Drop mag, slingshot
    Reload: Drop mag, insert mag, slingshot
    Clear Malfunction: Drop mag, slingshot x3, insert mag, slingshot

    If you use the slide "release" method you have to change motions to clear malfunctions.





    The video RDTM posted explained how if you carry a gun that has a safety/decocker on the slide (Beretta, Bersa, Jericho) it isn't a good idea to use the sling shot method. This is a very valid point. I learned something that I can pass on to others.



    As far as your bold part... if it wasn't external you wouldn't be able to lock the slide to the rear on demand.
     
  19. GeorgeShootaire

    GeorgeShootaire Site Supporter

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    Fair enough. I tend to demo every known decent way to do something and explain the logic for each, they end up making their own decisions anyway. At least I can give them the information. If I train with someone who does things differently I'll try to entertain their methods within reason and safety.
     
  20. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    The way I was trained is that, when you changing the mag, you flip the gun sideways so you're holding it with your strong hand, looking at the side of it. This allows you to look past it to see your threat and, when you've retrieved your mag, you can change your focus to the firearm to see the mag load, if needed. Once the mag is loaded, the slide is released using the slide lock and thumb of the dominant hand, the gun is spun around to put muzzle on target, and you re-engage the threat. It is quick and eliminates the step of reaching to rack the slide. Any FTF at that point would then result in the regular clearing method of racking the slide and bumping the mag.