My first and hopefully last ND

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Myright, Jun 13, 2017.

  1. Myright

    Myright Freedom Loving Citizen

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    Let me tell you about a little experience I had last month when we had family stay with us for a few days to watch my step-daughter graduate from Kennesaw State University.
    I live in an area of Canton where I can literally step out to the back of my yard and shoot my firearms. A few of my brother in-laws were interested in shooting handguns and rifles, so I set up a few of my zombie targets on the trees down range and proceeded to instruct everyone on firearm safety. I went over the four rules and then showed each of them the proper handling of the handguns.
    Everything was going smoothly and we were all enjoying our turn at taking out those pesky zombies.
    We then switched to the rifles and rotated between the .22 and my Mosin M44. As one of my BILs was shooting the Mosin, he ran into an issue where a round wasn't advancing forward when he was in the process of pushing the bolt forward. We were using old military surplus ammo from the '70's. He handed the rifle to me and I first tried to push the round backwards with my fingers, but it was stuck at the mouth of the magazine and wouldn't budge. I then knelt down to the ground so I could get better leverage, resting the rifle stock on the ground. I tried to advance the bolt forward, but it didn't seem to want to move, so I pulled the bolt backward and gave it a good slap forward when all of a sudden....BOOM!!!!

    At this point, I was in a bit of shock....what the heck just happened? I felt splatter all over my hand and up my arm. My hand was immediately numb.
    I look down at my hand and see what appears to be melted skin with a combination of open wounds and charred tissue. Blood started to just ooze out of my hand. My BILs asked me if I was ok and I told them I was fine, but I should probably go inside and clean up my hand. I remained extremely calm during the entire event. After cleaning up my hand and arm, I realize that the blood on my arm wasn't from blood splatter as I originally thought. My arm was oozing blood just like my hand was. I had open wound powder burns all up my arm. It's like the powder burned off the outer layers of skin, just so it could ooze.
    I scrubbed all of my hand's wounds with a soft bristle tooth brush while my wife poured hydrogen peroxide all over. She gave me some pain killer while my hand was still numb so it would kick in before the numbness went away. After getting it cleaned up the best I could, I took a few snap shots for your viewing pleasure. :)
    It took nearly 3 weeks for all of the area to heal and all of the scabs fall off. It will take some time for the tissue to regenerate back to a somewhat normal level again. At this point, the skin is more sensitive to the touch than the rest, but at least I didn't lose any digits from my careless act.
    I think I have a hairline fracture in my pinky finger, as I was bending/testing all of my fingers and received an extreme amount of pain from it. I can easily move everything like normal with no pain, so it's just going to take more time to heal fully.

    I searched online for anyone else that experienced a ND like mine and did find a couple of instances. What I determined was this...

    Upon cycling the bolt, extracting the last fired brass casing and advancing the next round in the chamber, the round did not fully rise to it’s correct position at the top of the magazine and into the receiver, causing a misalignment with the round. When the bolt advances in attempts to seat the round, it only jams the round tighter between the magazine and receiver, not moving forward very far at all. When additional thrusts to the bolt are made, it further jams the round, causing the front of the round to hit the underside and below the feed ramp.
    The round finally goes off due to compacting the bullet into the powder and setting the nitro off in the berdan primer.
    There was no round in the chamber at the time of the incident.

    I certainly learned my lesson over the ordeal. I'm thankful I was following the four rules while causing the ND. A good pair of leather shooting gloves would have saved me some tissue damage, no doubt.

    [​IMG]

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  2. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    That deserves a double ouch.

    Nemo
     

  3. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Maybe a class by a qualified instructor would have helped with what to do with FTF's such as this. There are really 3 very basic rules of gun safety. There are 4 others that deal with unusual situations such as Hang Fire, Miss Fire, Failure to Fire and Failure to Feed. This failure to feed mistake was totally preventable had you been aware of all the rules of safe gun handling. There are also other rules of safe gun handling not mentioned here but are covered in a class. It's my opinion and only my opinion if you can only name 4 rules then perhaps a class would be in order or some other form of study to get up to speed.
     
  4. Myright

    Myright Freedom Loving Citizen

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    No doubt, had I had a better understanding of the berdan primer, I would have treated this situation very differently. The good thing to come from this is that I did most certainly learn from the experience. I must admit, it was due to haste to clear the round. It will never be an option in the future, that is for sure.
     
  5. Savannah Dan

    Savannah Dan Cross-drawer

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    Thank you very much for sharing your experience with us.
     
  6. Glockenator

    Glockenator Active Member

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    Yes - thank you for sharing this. I'm sorry it happened to you. Hopefully, a lot of people can learn from this very unfortunate incident.

    I think this incident leans a little more toward "accidental" than "negligent", if I understand correctly what happened. I think that incident could have happened to a whole lot of people; me included. I think it was caused by a lack of understanding of the whole mechanical process of how that particular type of gun operates, and not from a simple brain fart or stupidity.

    I presume you had the gun pointed in a safe direction, and if I understand correctly, your finger wasn't on the trigger.

    I have had only one ND in my 50 years and 30 years of gun ownership, and it was because of my brain fart and stupidity. But I was following the most important rule of all, by having it pointed in a safe(r) direction, so nobody but my house wall got hurt. But I was incredibly stupid to have intentionally pulled the trigger, after removing the magazine, but without clearing and double-checking the chamber.
     
  7. Myright

    Myright Freedom Loving Citizen

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    Yes, TenMillimeter, you are correct. My finger wasn't on the trigger and it was pointing downrange. The casing has no indention at all on the bottom...the center of the round is completely clean. So, the primer wasn't struck from the outside. It was ignited from being compacted by the bullet compressing inward.
     
  8. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    Accident

    Accident.

    I don't see any negligence here.

    I'd probably yank on the bolt of a milsurp very hard if it had feeding problems (or extraction or ejection problems).

    Now we all know better.

    But that doesn't mean our knowledge a week ago was inexcusably deficient.
     
  9. Glockenator

    Glockenator Active Member

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    Yes ^^. And Myright, I hope you aren't beating yourself up about this. It could have happened to just about anyone.

    Again - thanks for sharing. And I admire you for it, as there are a whole lot of people who would never admit to a firearm discharging when they didn't want it to.
     
  10. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    The first picture is the casing? Where is the bullet? Which end is up? Since I see a rim at the bottom, I am guessing that deformed monstrosity at the top is the bullet, where it was shoved forward into or under the feed ramp? Where is the hole in the casing, or is there one?
     
  11. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    Yeah jamming a bolt down on a stuck round is a bad idea for now-obvious reasons. At least you weren't seriously hurt. It is a hard way to learn a lesson, but definitely effective. It reminds me of people that have had squib rounds that leave the bullet stuck in the barrel and think something is wrong as the report didn't sound right and recoil didn't feel right, but fire the next round just the same, only to have their firearm explode in their hands.
     
  12. NTA

    NTA Well-Known Member

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    That's the best way to have a "last" ND. Live to tell about it.
     
  13. Scout706

    Scout706 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like it was an "out-of battery" incident. 5th (or 6th or whatever) rule: Don't force it. Ever.
     
  14. Myright

    Myright Freedom Loving Citizen

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    All of the powder spit out and around the bullet. The bullet appears to have melted a bit, yet the jacket is still there.
    The smaller portion of the casing that holds the bullet appears to have sunk down into the casing just a bit.
     
  15. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    I had a Savage 10 bolt action .243 jam yesterday, and the bolt got stuck "mostly" closed, and would not easily go back either.

    I kept this thread in mind as I pulled on it, and I did not beat it with a block of wood which I might otherwise have done.