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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm new to the board but have been lurking here for a while. I have my GWL and a couple of pistols along with several shotguns. I just picked up a new XD45c and absolutely love shooting it. I'm wondering if there might be somebody who would be willing to share some of their accumulated reloading knowledge with a newbie? I live in East Cobb and work in Sandy Springs. I'm interested in learning the ropes before getting into reloading myself. I've looked at the different options (single-stage, turret, progressive, etc) and have ordered a couple basics books. However, in my mind there would be no better real-world learning experience than getting my hands dirty, learning safety tips, what to look for in used brass, quality control, cranking out some loads, etc. I'm somewhat familiar with shotshell reloading but haven't ventured into metallic as of yet.

In exchange I would obviously be willing to provide some combination of new ammo, empty brass, $$, free labor, etc. Please just let me know if you live on the North side of Atlanta and have any interest in showing me your bench and tools.

Mods...please feel free to place in a different location if more appropriate.

Thanks much!
Brian
 

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If you don't find someone closer, I'd be glad to run some through the mill with you. I reload 9 & 45 on a Lee Turret. I'm on the east side of Johns Creek, so not next door to your stomping grounds. I'm swamped for the next week, but PM me this time next week if you're still looking. In the meantime, get your 45acp brass collection going....

(Oh, yeah, this should be in Ammo forum.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thx Editing....i'll move to the right location. I appreciate the offer and will PM you next week.
 

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I'm posting to the thread with the most replies.... match10 (who posted in the other thread) is close and can help, but I'd suggest you do something before calling him..... Buy the 49th edition Lyman reloading manual and read it over and over again. Practically memorize it. (I recommend the 49th edition due to it being the easiest reading reloading manual I've read yet). The reloading manual is your Bible. It tells you everything. Once you have read it, have a good understanding of what's up, then call Match10 and make a lot or two of ammo.... you'll be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies guys. Funny you should mention the Lyman manual. I have it and the latest version of the ABCs of Reloading already on order from Amazon. I appreciate the offers to help thus far and will PM you guys directly.
 

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I also recommend using YouTube. Do a search on reloading and many videos of all of the steps in reloading pop up. It is how I go started. The most important thing I learned early on was to check the powder level in all of my cases after filling them. You can visually tell if any of them are either low or high with the power. I don't have time to spend reloading right now but the internet study did it for me. The two books you ordered were my first two also.

Regards,

jplapp
 

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i have been thinking about starting to reload myself, I go to the range atleast once or twice a month and i shoot 200-300 rounds of .45 acp each trip. I never thought about reloading before but with ammo prices high it's making more sense now to reload. I'd like to have a simple setup for loading only target load .45 acp.
 

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My average range trips were getting a bit expensive at 300-500+rds per gun, so I started relaoding about 6-9 months ago. Don't misunderstand me here but, it's not all that hard. There's no real voodoo or dark arts involved, until you reach a level way beyond basic reloading.
I went full out with a progressive press and all the needed support equipment and never looked at it as anything other than an investment.

Tons of info http://www.thehighroad.org/forumdisplay.php?f=15
 

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coopertrades said:
Thanks for the replies guys. Funny you should mention the Lyman manual. I have it and the latest version of the ABCs of Reloading already on order from Amazon. I appreciate the offers to help thus far and will PM you guys directly.
You're gonna be good to go after you read both up and down, left and right, forwards and backwards. You will have a good grasp of what the tools are, what materials are needed, and the dangers involved. This is not something to go into half-stupid. It's also not that complicated either. You're basically doing what has been done for hundreds of years, just in the modern version.... fill with powder, top with projectile, have a method of igniting the powder in the chamber. (of course, its more technical than that.) But the gist is what's important.

These days, you pop the old spent primer out, resize the case, clean case if necessary, re-prime, fill with correct amount of powder, top with projectile, crimp if necessary, viola. It's awesome, it's not rocket science. 4 components, get em right and you'll be happier than a puppy with two peters because your stuff is better than over the counter stuff.
 

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JiG said:
It's awesome, it's not rocket science. 4 components, get em right and you'll be happier than a [s:3br8bdzv]puppy with two peters[/s:3br8bdzv]Happier'n a four peckered puppybecause your stuff is better than over the counter stuff.
FTFY :righton:

I honestly found that reading the ABC's gave me a better understanding of the basics than any of the other manuals did. I recommend starting there and working your way out to the others.
 

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galvatron said:
My average range trips were getting a bit expensive at 300-500+rds per gun, so I started relaoding about 6-9 months ago. Don't misunderstand me here but, it's not all that hard. There's no real voodoo or dark arts involved, until you reach a level way beyond basic reloading.
I went full out with a progressive press and all the needed support equipment and never looked at it as anything other than an investment.

Tons of info http://www.thehighroad.org/forumdisplay.php?f=15
Question I have for you though, have you found reloading to be that much cheaper than buying new? I have also thought about getting into reloading, but for me, it is a lack of time to do the reloading. Also, would you mind sharing what you have in cost per round, not including the equipment.

I have just gotten a 12 guage Stoeger O/U, so kind of interested about reloading that as well.

Thanks
 

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It does work out to be cheaper to reload. I can reload 45 for almost half of retail, 9mm is creeping higher in the stores as well 10.47 for 50 locally. .45acp works out to about 7.50 per 50, 9mm is about 6.75. The price for both could be lowered if you really hunted down the absolute lowest prices for components. Or if you and some friends buy in much larger bulk quantities.

Most of the HAZMAT fees can be skipped buy buying samller amounts locally, as in 8# of powder and 1-2k of primers. The dollar or two more your local shop may charge is still cheaper than then additional shipping, plus it supports your local shop :righton: . Beleive it or not most of the local guys, are within 3 dollars a pound when it comes to powder and the same for primers compared to online sources or each other.
Bullet choices can add significant increases to your cost, so look around for who has what you want. Again most shops are really close when it comes to prices, this is where some of the online guys blow the locals out of the water though.
I hear you on the lack of time. I'm currently working 6-7 days, 60hrs plus. Any spare time I have is spent with the wife, dogs etc. Haven't been shooting in 2 months. I do manage to find a few minutes a day to perform some reloading operation. I wont drop powder without at least half an hour to work. You can deprime and size cases at any time, starting and stopping as needed. 15 minutes is a lot of deprimed/sized cases. Brass can be tumbled without supervision.

simple load cost calculator
http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp
 

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galvatron said:
It does work out to be cheaper to reload. I can reload 45 for almost half of retail, 9mm is creeping higher in the stores as well 10.47 for 50 locally. .45acp works out to about 7.50 per 50, 9mm is about 6.75. The price for both could be lowered if you really hunted down the absolute lowest prices for components. Or if you and some friends buy in much larger bulk quantities.

Most of the HAZMAT fees can be skipped buy buying samller amounts locally, as in 8# of powder and 1-2k of primers. The dollar or two more your local shop may charge is still cheaper than then additional shipping, plus it supports your local shop :righton: . Beleive it or not most of the local guys, are within 3 dollars a pound when it comes to powder and the same for primers compared to online sources or each other.
Bullet choices can add significant increases to your cost, so look around for who has what you want. Again most shops are really close when it comes to prices, this is where some of the online guys blow the locals out of the water though.
I hear you on the lack of time. I'm currently working 6-7 days, 60hrs plus. Any spare time I have is spent with the wife, dogs etc. Haven't been shooting in 2 months. I do manage to find a few minutes a day to perform some reloading operation. I wont drop powder without at least half an hour to work. You can deprime and size cases at any time, starting and stopping as needed. 15 minutes is a lot of deprimed/sized cases. Brass can be tumbled without supervision.

simple load cost calculator
http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp
Thanks for the info!
 

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If you can read, you can handload.
The only thing not to be taken too seriously in the reloading manuals is brand recommendations. All manuals provide good basic info and data but push "THEIR" products. They all do it: Lyman, Lee, Hornady, RCBS, etc.
 

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YZ#58 said:
galvatron said:
My average range trips were getting a bit expensive at 300-500+rds per gun, so I started relaoding about 6-9 months ago. Don't misunderstand me here but, it's not all that hard. There's no real voodoo or dark arts involved, until you reach a level way beyond basic reloading.
I went full out with a progressive press and all the needed support equipment and never looked at it as anything other than an investment.

Tons of info http://www.thehighroad.org/forumdisplay.php?f=15
Question I have for you though, have you found reloading to be that much cheaper than buying new? I have also thought about getting into reloading, but for me, it is a lack of time to do the reloading. Also, would you mind sharing what you have in cost per round, not including the equipment.

I have just gotten a 12 guage Stoeger O/U, so kind of interested about reloading that as well.

Thanks
Everyone first interested in reloading is concerned about saving money. Yes, you will, no you won't. You'll still spend the same, but you will have more rounds of ammo in the end.

Reloading is a fun and rewarding hobby in and of itself, the fact that you get to see your results when you pull a trigger makes it all the more better. :righton:
 

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A good part of your cost for reloading is the bullet. After a while you will want to get into casting your own bullets for even more savings. I cast 9mm, .44, .45 (ACP&LC), 38/357, .40 and 45/70. It also makes the reloading a little more enjoyable.

I wish you were closer to the Athens area, I would love to teach someone a little of what I know (even though it's not hard). My son doesn't seem interested at all and my grandkids are interested for a little while and then quickly find something else to do!
 

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zetor said:
.....The only thing not to be taken too seriously in the reloading manuals is brand recommendations. All manuals provide good basic info and data but push "THEIR" products. .....
Uh, that is a big "NO!" Do not make substitutions! Especially as a beginner!

I have experienced many pressure variations with simply using different primers! If a certain loading uses a certain primer, do not substitute without working up that load from the mid-range. Pressures can vary IMMENSELY from one primer brand to another, as well as one company's lot to lot!

Different manufacturers of brass can have drastically different internal volumes from head thicknesses and wall thicknesses. This can be the difference in just a little pressure, or compressing the powder and wildly increasing chamber pressures!

Further, you cannot simply change a bullet from brand to brand either, without making sure the bullet is of a similar constrution. Using lead loads with jacketed and vice versa, can be disasterous. Using a solid copper where a gilding metal jacketed lead can be as well. Using a steel core where a lead core is the load, is just a big scream "NOOooooo!" from my experience. Further, the diameter and thickness of the jacket... Contact surface and ogive can cause wild variations in pressures using the same data. The list goes on.

PLEASE, NEVER substitute components unless you really, really, REALLY know what you are doing and have the ability to recognize excess pressure!
 

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Further, never take one compay's published loads as Gospel. Always check other manuals to ensure that a mistake is not in the manual you are reading. There have been mistakes in manuals, trust me. Having more than one source to compare and at least make sure the load is somewhat "in the same ballpark" can mean the difference in your future nickname, "Squint" or "Lefty"!

I have over 170 manuals, from the earliest Lyman to the latest Hogden. I also keep load articles from virtually every magazine published with loads I make. It is scary to see just how different loads can be from differing sources using the "same" components.

It is not "safe" and it is not child's play, though it can be as safe as you can ensure it to be. I know many handloaders that have made "trivial", though crucial, mistakes, only to ruin a gun or worse.
 

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Match10 said:
zetor said:
.....The only thing not to be taken too seriously in the reloading manuals is brand recommendations. All manuals provide good basic info and data but push "THEIR" products. .....
Uh, that is a big "NO!" Do not make substitutions! Especially as a beginner!

I have experienced many pressure variations with simply using different primers! If a certain loading uses a certain primer, do not substitute without working up that load from the mid-range. Pressures can vary IMMENSELY from one primer brand to another, as well as one company's lot to lot!

Different manufacturers of brass can have drastically different internal volumes from head thicknesses and wall thicknesses. This can be the difference in just a little pressure, or compressing the powder and wildly increasing chamber pressures!

Further, you cannot simply change a bullet from brand to brand either, without making sure the bullet is of a similar constrution. Using lead loads with jacketed and vice versa, can be disasterous. Using a solid copper where a gilding metal jacketed lead can be as well. Using a steel core where a lead core is the load, is just a big scream "NOOooooo!" from my experience. Further, the diameter and thickness of the jacket... Contact surface and ogive can cause wild variations in pressures using the same data. The list goes on.

PLEASE, NEVER substitute components unless you really, really, REALLY know what you are doing and have the ability to recognize excess pressure!
I wasn't talking about components match. I'm talking about equipment ie scales, powder measures, dies, etc. I figured that was obvious.
Every manual pushes their products. As I said before, the only thing not to be taken too seriously in reloading manuals is brand recommendations.

If you can read, you can handload.

170 manuals?
Are you serious? Why????

You seem like a literate guy coopertrades. Get a manual (you won't need 170) and you will be on your way. It isn't some super exclusive hobby. Feel free to mix equipment as you see fit. Get a press with standard 7/8"-14 threads and virtually all BRAND dies will work. You might want to look into the starter kits as most provide most all you need to get going at a lower cost than separately purchased items.
Good luck to you sir.
 

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zetor said:
I wasn't talking about components match. I'm talking about equipment ie scales, powder measures, dies, etc. I figured that was obvious......
No, it is not really obvious in your previous statements. Further, the choice of dies and methods (and equipment for) priming cases is important as well. However, the manuals do tout their sister company's bullets, brass, primers, etc. Perhaps that is not obvious to you? There are reasons to avoid certain diesets made by certain manufacturers. I avoid certain presses fro reasons of which I was taught.

zetor said:
If you can read, you can handload..
Not quite true. There is an absolute benefit to learning from a teacher. Pitfalls and mistakes are not always evident. Caution cannot be taught without guidance. You have proven here that the written word cannot be relied upon, as you did not specify what you meant in your writings... ie: You implied substitutions were acceptable and never elaborated. In fact, I would go so far as to say there are very few reference sources on reloading that are completely accurate and whole in their commentary of reloading.

zetor said:
170 manuals?
Are you serious? Why????.
I have been blessed with family who was very into the shooting sports. Some of my earliest memories are of my grandfather, a gunsmith, doing custom reloading for clients in the "Reloading Room", along with the smell of Hoppes #9. I learned at the knee of him, my uncles, and my father. I have been reloading myself for 40+ years. I have all their manuals, going back into the Speer #1, and Sierra #1.

With respect to more modern recipes, I feel it is extrememly important to get multiple sources for a load and powder combination at the start. The competing manuals often have comparable loads, yet do not always agree. You have to compare to be safe. I do things for safety that have not ever been in any one manual, or only recently have been recommended in magazine articles. It's what I was taught, not what I read. (The 'science' of case inspection alone is vast!) One source will not encompass the safety and technique for this hobby, which must be of the utmost care to be safe for the shooter.

No book will say, "Hey Dummy! You did that wrong!"

zetor said:
....with standard 7/8"-14 threads and virtually all BRAND dies will work...
Another generalization.... Were he to completely rely upon your written word on that above, he may go out and purchase non-carbide, steel dies for a pistol cartridge. There is a vast difference in many diesets available.
 
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