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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok it may have been said many times before , but i am looking to buy an ar style rifle. uses are home defense and hunting in GA.
don't need the super best with all the light bells and whistles but just a simple rifle to get the job done . mostly the hunting part.. as i have never been hunting...
don't want to start the best caliber type of thing but if it must be , it must be. i am looking for a 5.56 or better for what i am trying to do . and nice to see the yall at the gun show at the farmers market last sat and Sunday ...... i saw a dpms with no rear site but a front site for $599 (yes i should have bought it but i am also rebuilding my hot rod) but i don't want the buyers remorse also . so i waited,,tax time is around the corner.,.

i really want to go hunting but i want an AR type to do it with.
i have a handgun for home and carry so that's not a real issue
deer is what i am looking for and its the reason i say 5.56 or larger . never been hunting so i don't know what we really have in ga.
just a few things there about what i am looking for and why . i am open for suggestions .....

keep up the good forums also :righton:
 

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Deer hunting at typical Georgia woods distances, it's hard to beat a lever-action .30-30, and a bolt-action Mosin Nagant carbine is an economical alternative, but an AR should do the job. Why limit yourself to one rifle? You have a while before next deer season. Remember, the coolest guy on the hunt is the one who comes out of the woods with a buck!
 

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I happen to have the CDNN catalog next to me.

Colt M4 Carbine #6920 (1in 7) for $1099
Colt A2 Carbine #6920 (1in 7) for $899
CMMG M4 piston for $849
CMMG 16" with bull barrel for $799
S&W M4 (1 in 9) for $849

Add $15 for shipping and $25 for the FFL transfer.
 

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I don't think that .223 is a great deer rifle round.
Sure, it can work sometimes if the conditions are right.
If you have to get an AR type rifle in this caliber, get one with a 1:9 twist rate in the barrel and plan on using soft-point bullets around 70 grains in weight, and only take good shots with no vegitation in the way, no quartering-away shots.
Personally I'd stick to shooting 100 yards or less and only taking head, neck, or heart shots.

If you are willing to get an AR in a different caliber that is better for deer hunting, expect to pay more. But it might be worth it. I'd rather have an AR in 6.8mm that is both my "militia gun" and my "deer rifle" than to have two different guns, the $700 AR in .223 for defense and a $400 bolt action deer rifle in .308 for hunting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i really need to bone up on my hunting stuff as i haven't been hunting yet. so ,i do know caliber is important as all get out but in my are there's no body to tell or teach me anything . so i turn to the forums here. ( i live in Decatur) . so i have a few questions. and hunters please fell free to chime in .
1.smallest caliber allowed in GA, and whats a "standard" caliber size for what i want do do .
2. bolt action or semi auto type( i guess that would be preference)
3. about how much does a hunting permit cost
4. where is a good spot to hunt at when the time comes.. as in what and how do i find out where to hunt at ..
yes i am a complete noob at this so any and all help is welcome
ohh and about what raner ,if i did get a .223 ,is it accurate to . as far as neck ,spine or lung shots. looking at a bushmaster .http://www.bushmaster.com/catalog_xm15_ ... 6SLORC.asp
carbon lower . good idea or no? i think its 599 at forest park army navy store. sum x-mas deal or sumthin like that said but they still have them in stock...

if this belongs in a different place feel free to move it there
 

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Have you considered an AR-10? (An AR chambered in .308) To quote my brother... ".308... Because people like to hide behind stuff." I'm only half sure that he was kidding.

Back on topic.... .308 is a very good caliber for hunting and ammunition is readily available just about anywhere. If you need cheaper ammunition, Lee sells a single stage reloading press with everything you'd need to get into reloading for about a hundred dollars. I have one and it may not be fast, but I can reload .308 for around 46 cents a round.

:)
 

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A .223 is basically a varmint round. It is regarded as being good for coyotes, woodchucks / groundhogs, and other varmints and predators weighing under 50 pounds.

A "standard" deer rifle round is usually one that fires a bullet between 7mm (.284 inch) and 7.62 mm (.30 caliber) diameter, weighing at least 150 grains, and with a muzzle velocity of between 2,400 and 3,000 feet per second. Such rounds not only have plenty of "kinetic energy" at the muzzle, but they retain their velocity and killing power out to hundreds of yards distance, and the bullets are heavy enough to drive deep into the meat of an animal and even penetrate bones inside the critter.

A .243 Winchester and some other 6mm class calibers are very good for deer hunting, but they're not the "standard" round. They will work, but they're not that common in the hunting field.

If you aren't sure what kind of big-game hunting you might want to do in the future, and you want to keep the most options open to you, the AR-10 or some other AR platform rifle in .308 would be an excellent choice. With a good scope on a flat-top receiver, you should have both the accuracy and killing power to hunt deer, wild hogs, black bear, etc. out to any reasonable distance (maybe 300 yards?)
 

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The GON (Georgia Outdoor Network) has a forum section, and there is a LOT of great information there, and many helpful people willing to answer questions, about hunting.

The main GON website is: gon.com

The forum site is: forum.gon.com

P.S. Georgia allows deer hunting with any centerfire rifle or handgun caliber that uses an expanding bullet.
That means the government expect us to use common sense, and not hunt deer with a Kel-Tec P32 pistol using 70-grain hollowpoint bullets at 1000 f.p.s. Even though it would be "legal" as to caliber.
 

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inFEKTid said:
i really need to bone up on my hunting stuff as i haven't been hunting yet. so ,i do know caliber is important as all get out but in my are there's no body to tell or teach me anything . so i turn to the forums here. ( i live in Decatur) . so i have a few questions. and hunters please fell free to chime in .
1.smallest caliber allowed in GA, and whats a "standard" caliber size for what i want do do .
2. bolt action or semi auto type( i guess that would be preference)
3. about how much does a hunting permit cost
4. where is a good spot to hunt at when the time comes.. as in what and how do i find out where to hunt at ..
yes i am a complete noob at this so any and all help is welcome
ohh and about what raner ,if i did get a .223 ,is it accurate to . as far as neck ,spine or lung shots. looking at a bushmaster .http://www.bushmaster.com/catalog_xm15_ ... 6SLORC.asp
carbon lower . good idea or no? i think its 599 at forest park army navy store. sum x-mas deal or sumthin like that said but they still have them in stock...

if this belongs in a different place feel free to move it there
Bushmaster anything = Bad Idea, Bushmaster Carbon = Really bad idea

There are much higher quality alternatives available for the same or a little more money.Check out the Daniel Defense offerings at smartgunner.com or take a gander at BravoCompanyUSA.com 's offerings. For your purposes I'd look at a 18" barreled DMR or SPR type rifle with a free floated forearm. The free float part is important if you are interested in extracting the most accuracy potential from the rifle. You can get a railed forearm or a non railed one like a PRI carbon fiber or an extruded aluminum tube type VTAC or Troy Industries. You can add rail sections to these FF tubes as necessary for stuff like optics, lights, lasers, bipods, can openers, washer dyer combos, and even a friggin iPhone running a ballistics program.

For hunting with 64-75 grain 5.56 ammo you'll want a 1/8 or 1/7 rifling twist rate barrel. Some 1/9 twist barrels will stabilize heavy bullets and some won't. If they don't the bullets will tumble in mid flight and you will have serious accuracy issues.

For optics it really depends on what you want to do with the gun. For daylight hunting deer and hogs with an AR my favorite optic is a 1-4x Trijicon scope with the german cross hair reticle. Where I hunt the longest shot I'll ever attempt will be about 250 yards so 4x magnification is enough for me. If you need more magnification choose a different scope accordingly. A good scope will cost you $400+. Yeh, I know there's tons of scopes out there for less. I'm from the buy once, cry once tribe though. as far as scope mounts and AR's go there is one "best choice". Go to Laruetactical.com and get one of their mounts. They also sell scope/mount combos at reasonable prices and have spectacular customer service.

5.56mm will kill the crap out of a whitetail deer or a hog. There are two keys to doing this in fast in an ethical humane manner. First, you have to be able to reliably place rounds where they kill the animal as quickly and painlessly as possible. That requires an accurate rifle and a dependable optic and good shooting skills and judgment on your part. The hardware part is easy to get. It just takes a one time purchase and a little basic care. The software part takes place between your ears is a little harder and takes continual practice to be any good.

Second the ammunition you use has to penetrate far enough and disrupt enough tissue and organs to kill the animal as quickly as possible. Hunting a deer or a hog with a 45 grain varmint bullet would be stupid and potentially dangerous. It won't reliably penetrate deep enough to kill the animal. It's designed to vaporize ground squirrels. I like to use 68 - 77 grain ammo for killing critters with my AR. I killed 11 hogs and a doe last year with this kind of ammo and none of them moved more than 10 feet from where they got shot. Most of them dropped in their tracks. Black Hills, Hornady TAP, Corbon, Federal Match, and ASYM ammo are all very good manufacturers of quality ammunition. Every gun will "like" one particular type/brand/lot of ammo over others. You need to acquire a box of each and shoot them all to see which shoots the most accurately from your rifle. It'll be a weird eye opening experience when you do it. Some match ammo may shoot pie plate sized groups and another almost identical load from a different company using the same weight bullet will put 5 rounds in a dime sized group.

You can use lighter 62 - 65 grain ammo but it usually doesn't penetrate as far and it's usually harder to find good bonded or monolithic (Barnes TSX or Hornady GMX) ammo in quantity or as cheap as the heavy stuff. YMMV up around Atlanta. I'm way down south. You want a bonded bullet, i.e. one that the lead core is chemically bonded to the gilding metal jacket. Alternatively and fiendishly more expensive and difficult to find are the solid copper or gilding metal hollowpoint bullets like the two I mentioned above. I've used them and they are impressive performers. They should be since they cost anywhere from $1.50 to $2.30 per round! This is crucial for the necessary reliable penetration of the lighter bullet through bone and muscle so it can get to the internal organs and destroy them.
 

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I've always liked .308 for a hunting rifle.
 

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.270 here.
 

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gunsmoker said:
A .223 is basically a varmint round. It is regarded as being good for coyotes, woodchucks / groundhogs, and other varmints and predators weighing under 50 pounds.

A "standard" deer rifle round is usually one that fires a bullet between 7mm (.284 inch) and 7.62 mm (.30 caliber) diameter, weighing at least 150 grains, and with a muzzle velocity of between 2,400 and 3,000 feet per second. Such rounds not only have plenty of "kinetic energy" at the muzzle, but they retain their velocity and killing power out to hundreds of yards distance, and the bullets are heavy enough to drive deep into the meat of an animal and even penetrate bones inside the critter.

A .243 Winchester and some other 6mm class calibers are very good for deer hunting, but they're not the "standard" round. They will work, but they're not that common in the hunting field.

If you aren't sure what kind of big-game hunting you might want to do in the future, and you want to keep the most options open to you, the AR-10 or some other AR platform rifle in .308 would be an excellent choice. With a good scope on a flat-top receiver, you should have both the accuracy and killing power to hunt deer, wild hogs, black bear, etc. out to any reasonable distance (maybe 300 yards?)
I keep seeing you belittle the .223 as a deer hunting round.
That is simply not true. I know a couple of people who use it exclusively and in single shot rifles. They always get their freezer full every season and more than enough to share. One shot one kill. They claim it drops them in their tracks.
 

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For deer hunting a .223 CAN do the job, but in the vast majority of cases it probably won't, at least not very quickly. I would recommend the savage edge as a good entry level hunting rifle, it is about $400 with a scope and comes in many calibers--.308 is great, .270 also great, and .30-06, while it packs a little more punch, will let you bring down pretty much any game animal in north america.
 

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mrhutch said:
For deer hunting a .223 CAN do the job, but in the vast majority of cases it probably won't, at least not very quickly. I would recommend the savage edge as a good entry level hunting rifle, it is about $400 with a scope and comes in many calibers--.308 is great, .270 also great, and .30-06, while it packs a little more punch, will let you bring down pretty much any game animal in north america.
But it's not quite an AR type rifle. DPMS makes AR type rifles in many different calibers. The OP is looking for feedback on AR type rifles.

Such as the DPMS LR .308...



Verry accurate and hard hitting at medium to long range.
 

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seajay:

Expert hunters can get away with using guns and ammo that are not best-suited for beginners, or people who want the most options to go after deer from various ranges under various conditions. Poachers kill truckloads of deer with .22 rimfires. Are you going to recommend those calibers too?

If you're hunting from a deer stand and shooting down at a deer that is 50 feet away, you could probably bag it with just about anything, including a thrown spear or bowling ball.

Don't forget that even though SOME loads in .223 are OK for some shots at some deer, nearly ALL commercially available loads in ..308 are good for deer.

Finally, don't forget that to many farmers and property owners who are not gun experts, but who may sometimes hunt deer themselves, a real deer rifle doesn't come in a caliber that starts with a "2" or a millimeter designation of anything less than a "6." You might not get permission to hunt, and you may not be taken seriously as a hunter, if you bring what is widely seen as a varmint caliber on a big game hunt. (Even if you actually know what you're doing and could make it work).
 

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AR-10 case closed. :righton:
 

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gunsmoker said:
seajay:

Expert hunters can get away with using guns and ammo that are not best-suited for beginners, or people who want the most options to go after deer from various ranges under various conditions. Poachers kill truckloads of deer with .22 rimfires. Are you going to recommend those calibers too?

If you're hunting from a deer stand and shooting down at a deer that is 50 feet away, you could probably bag it with just about anything, including a thrown spear or bowling ball.

Don't forget that even though SOME loads in .223 are OK for some shots at some deer, nearly ALL commercially available loads in ..308 are good for deer.

Finally, don't forget that to many farmers and property owners who are not gun experts, but who may sometimes hunt deer themselves, a real deer rifle doesn't come in a caliber that starts with a "2" or a millimeter designation of anything less than a "6." You might not get permission to hunt, and you may not be taken seriously as a hunter, if you bring what is widely seen as a varmint caliber on a big game hunt. (Even if you actually know what you're doing and could make it work).
I'm no hunting expert either. In fact I've never hunted anything in my life. I have seen the photos of what a single .223 have done to their deer. From their heads being almost removed to the left front leg completly severed at the shoulder. I do not know at what range they were shot at but the damage to the deer is massive. I also don't know if they were using hand loaded ammo or not.
 

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what i would recommend is a deer rifle AND an AR. 2 separate guns for separate purposes.

although you could also get a CETME in 7.62 for about $600 and put a scope on it and maybe a light/laser combo for short range home defense, it would certainly do both jobs.
 
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