LEO encounter: Constable v. Neighbor

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Malum Prohibitum, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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  2. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    Well, it's two years old, but I'm still pretty upset about the way the trial went. I don't see how Jurgenson was at fault, at all.

    Also, why the discussion about hollowpoints?
     

  3. Brian618

    Brian618 New Member

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    To show malice, since a hollow point is a "Cop Killer" to the uninitiated. I wonder if there was testimony as to what the Midland Police routinely carry in their service weapons?
     
  4. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    The one thing I got from reading this was Mr. Jurgenson really needed a better attorney!

    Once time, I was in the jury pool in small town Kentucky. The prosecutor was smart, aggressive and played dirty. He had an enviable conviction record...

    This being small town KY, most of the jurors were Baptist. (Remember that... it's important.) At the beginning of the trial, The Commonwealth's Attorney asked the jury pool if anyone knew him. Of course, most did. Would that affect their judgment? Etc., Etc. The usual questions.

    Then he asked if anyone knew the defending attorney. Were they sure? Perhaps they had seen him in church because he was very active in his church, St. Mary in the Field Roman Catholic church...!!! A few more questions and then the jury was picked. Not me of course. I was one of those "city people" who had moved in recently......

    Needless to say, he notched up another conviction.

    What I found disturbing about that incident was, while the Commonwealth's Attorney was heaping praise on the other attorney for being such a good and active catholic (and thereby sabotaging any possible chance he had of winning an acquittal), the other guy was almost beaming with pride for being so described.

    That defendant also really needed a better lawyer!
     
  5. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    I thought cop killers were all those teflon coated bullets with 'x'es carved into the tips! :p
     
  6. legacy38

    legacy38 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know TX law on such issues. I would think that spraying the dawgs through the fence was probably a no no. I don't agree with the constable's actions (not exactly sure what a constable's legal authorities entail), but if the arrest was legal, then the guy should have gotten far more than he did. If the arrest was illegal, he would have been within his rights (in GA) to resist an illegal arrest.
     
  7. Brian618

    Brian618 New Member

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    Maybe we can make some
    [​IMG]
     
  8. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    :D I've always loved engineering!
     
  9. ahlongslide

    ahlongslide New Member

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    :lol: WHY do they have to mention tumbleweeds EVERY time something happens in Texas?!?!?

    This might be a rural legend, but everyone in Texas that I was around on a daily basis thought there was a law that stated that you could shoot someone if you asked them to get off of your property and they didn't.

    Also, I think I would have pointed the gun at him too... with my finger off of the trigger. Since Mr. Harris was a LEO there was a higher chance of him being armed and I wouldn't want to be shot by an off-duty police officer "defending" himself.
     
  10. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    Texas has a castle doctrine, but that hardly means you can shoot someone if you ask them to get off your property. However, it should mean that Jurgenson had a little more legal ground to stand on. As far as I can tell, either the jury made a big mistake, or spraying the dogs killed his case. I'm much more inclined to believe the latter, since, well, it's Texas.
     
  11. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I think a more likely explanation is that juries just give the benefit of the doubt to police officers. Think about how many people think that calling the local PD is a good way to find out what the laws are on any particular issue. Even gun laws, which, by and large, they have demonstrated time and again they do not understand.

    This example and the example of the jury in California both demonstrate that when a cop takes the stand, a jury will believe that officer, unless there is compelling evidence otherwise. Their word is worth more than yours. I have had judges state this to me first hand, as well.

    Simple enough explanation?
     
  12. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    Yeah, what MP said!

    Anybody wanna bet the constable was in uniform when he testified?
     
  13. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    :lol: That I would like to know.
     
  14. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

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    I'd put money on it.
     
  15. legacy38

    legacy38 Well-Known Member

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    Do constables have uniforms there?
     
  16. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    You mean in Texas a bronze star, a hat, and boots is not a uniform?
    :lol:
     
  17. ahlongslide

    ahlongslide New Member

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    1) The sole purpose Texas Constables wear boots is to kick tumbleweeds out of the way.

    2) The sole purpose Texas Constables wear hats is just in case a tumbleweed hits an ant mound and makes it as high as their head.

    3) And not all Constables get to wear bronze stars... the bronze star is a prize for Constables who jump fences and assault neighbors as they round up the tumbleweed in their own yard.
     
  18. GAGunOwner

    GAGunOwner Active Member

  19. legacy38

    legacy38 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know of any Constables in GA, but it's possible that somebody is using them. Anybody know them in use in GA?

    The Marshals office is another one that can vary widely. IN many counties its pretty much a code enforcement position, but in a few GA counties they act pretty much as deputies.