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I'm fairly confident I know the answer, but figured I'd throw this out for our legal eagles to weigh in on. I know it doesn't exactly constitute legal advice, yadda yadda.

At any rate, my immediate supervisor seems intent on fabricating a reason to get rid of me. This comes after I caught them breaking a rule and reporting it, so now the supervisor has a grudge. After a recent one-on-one "disciplinary hearing", they've gone on to lie to their supervisor, alleging I made certain statements I never made. A higher supervisor bright this to my attention, asking about the statement and I assured them I never said what was alleged.

In the interest of covering my arse in future incidents, I intend to record the conversation so as to have proof of what was and was not said.

Based on my reading of O.C.G.A. 16-11-66, I should be clear to record due to me being a party to the conversation.
 

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Legally as long alone party knows the recording is happening it is legal in ga. You might have given up you right to record per employee agreements.
 

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From my experiences in forty plus years in the work force. The fact that his supervisor came and asked you directly about the statement means he already knows he is dealing with a dishonest weasel that is your direct supervisor.
 

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As long as you are a direct party to, or part of the conversation, you have every right to record. You cannot, however, intentionally record the private conversations of other persons that you are not invited- or otherwise a party-to, except perhaps by accident or coincidence, in which case such a recording would not be valid in a court of law.

E.g., you CAN record any conversations between yourself, and anyone else, boss, supervisor, co-worker, etc., without having to let the other party know. In other words, don't say anything to anyone that you wouldn't want recorded for posterity.

However, you cannot have a discussion with your boss, walk out of his office, and then stand outside the door and record his phone conversation, or conversation with another employee, etc. UNLESS one or more of the parties involved gave you permission to do so.

The hinge here is that at least one primary party in the communication who is directly involved must be aware - and approving - of your recording. As long as you are one of those parties, then no other permission is required and you're good to go.

Personally, I record every conversation I have with my boss in his office. Not because I don't trust him or expect him to do anything bad, but precisely because of the same reasons I carry a gun - because the things I *don't* expect to happen and *don't* plan/prepare for adequately could bite me in the butt later. I don't expect I'll ever need to use it for anything, but I record to keep myself and everyone else I interact with in the clear, and to ensure there is a record that my behavior was appropriate and aboveboard when interacting with others - the same reason I am ALWAYS recording audio whenever I am carrying a firearm in public, concealed or otherwise: because if there should be an issue for any reason, I have evidence, and don't have to rely on my word vs. someone else's.

Yes, theoretically employee agreements might attempt to suspend your right to record "for security purposes" and the like, but I could care less about that. I'm not recording to snoop on my company, and I don't record anything that could be genuinely business or security-sensitive, however if I'm the victim of criminal behavior, or if I should become aware of such, I believe my right to gather evidence to defend myself and to reveal any possible criminal behavior by others overrides business concerns. Particularly as violating a company agreement is not really a crime, whereas if I record evidence of a crime, it's better the actual criminal be caught via evidence. This is the same reason we have whistle-blower protection laws throughout the country (even though they're regularly ignored by courts and the government), because regardless of whether a corrupt government body might flaunt or ignore those laws to protect it's own butt, regardless of how much the bureaucrats and politicians hate the idea of them getting caught doing things they shouldn't, not a single one of them is going to stand up in public and assert that it's better to use laws to shield criminals breaking laws than it is to allow the violation of privacy agreements and the like so as to ensure that law-breakers in government or business are not allowed to continue getting away with their crimes while shielding themselves behind privacy laws.
 
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