Jacuzzi Reheating Element or Pump

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by IrishTiger, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. IrishTiger

    IrishTiger Active Member

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    Alright... so I've got this frustration, and I'm sure I can't be the ONLY one to have thought this, although it wouldn't surprise me if I am. :roll:

    I've got a jacuzzi in my master bathroom which I enjoy using from time to time. However, since my crawlspace is smallish (I can't stand up fully) my water heater is only like 40 gallons or 47 gallons. I think it's standard size, but my jacuzzi is a bit bigger than most. I find that when I fill the tub up, by the time its full, most (if not all) of the hot water is gone. I've turned the heat up on the water heater thinking that if it was hotter I would use less of it, but I don't want to turn it up too high I don't think. I admittedly don't know much about water heaters, and all I know is I don't want it to break, and I don't want it to electrocute me! :help:

    But one thing that's just been bugging the hell out of me for the past year is why someone doesn't make a jacuzzi pump that reheats the water? Or is there such a thing? I've looked and looked but can't find a thing. Maybe it's just not realistic. I understand the logic of having electricity near water, but surely there has to be some kind of product out there!
     
  2. IrishTiger

    IrishTiger Active Member

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  3. IrishTiger

    IrishTiger Active Member

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    Here's some images. I found this "manual" zip-tied to the pump. I had to write in the model info and stuff from the manufacturer sticker on the actual pump. Maybe someone can make some sense out of it?

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  4. JeF4y

    JeF4y New Member

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    Well, you answered your own question, but just to add, yes, it's common to have inline heaters to keep the water up to temp in many of the new tubs out today.

    I have a 50 gal water heater and turned it up a little higher than I would normally in order to accomplish the same.
     
  5. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    If that is on an isolated breaker, you might be able to use as much as 15 or 20 amps. My guess from the outlet used is 15 amps, but that is a question of the breaker and wiring. If it were a dedicated 20 amp circuit, then the 1500W rapid heat and the pump might be able to coexist. If not, you would need another circuit run for the heater.

    On that tag where somebody wrote "capacity 25uf 240v" I think they meant "capacitor" which is probably the starter cap for the motor. If you flick it on one day and nothing happens, the odds are that the starter cap has given up the ghost. Those are much cheaper to fix than replacing the motor and pump.
     
  6. IrishTiger

    IrishTiger Active Member

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    I actually wrote all that stuff. I'm not sure what the CAP meant, that's all it said - and I just figured it was capacity. It does have it's own breaker, and as you can see in one of the pics, the pump has it's own outlet and only one plug is being used.
     
  7. JeF4y

    JeF4y New Member

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    The pump along with the water heater might be a little too much, and personally if I were you I'd drop $20 and put a GFCI outlet in that box. Can't be too safe when it comes to water & power (unless of course you have a GFCI breaker, but they're about $100 and a lot of people skip them).
     
  8. ChipM

    ChipM Active Member

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    We are in the process of installing a jacuzzi tub. The inline heaters aren't expensive, but the trick is they supposedly require a dedicated circuit. The circuit I ran for the tub pump was my last available, so I think I'm out of luck for another.
     
  9. vanguard

    vanguard New Member

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    very good point :righton: