Italy just made it easier to claim self-defence if you kill or injure an intruder

Discussion in 'National Laws, Bills and Politics' started by Mrs_Esterhouse, Mar 28, 2019.

  1. Mrs_Esterhouse

    Mrs_Esterhouse Swollen Member

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    [​IMG]

    https://www.thelocal.it/20190328/italy-self-defence-law

     
  2. atlsrt44

    atlsrt44 Well-Known Member

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    If you listen to them in Rome youd swear that gypsy's break into their houses nightly. As well as steal children and sell bottled sewer water lol.
     

  3. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    The Romans allow mere citizens to be armed these days? I knew they did 2000 years ago.
     
  4. dhaller

    dhaller Active Member

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    Post-Sulla, weapons were forbidden to citizens in Rome. Even soldiers* were forbidden to carry them in the city (which is why Roman armies camped and trained outside the city, and why it was such a big thing when Pompey's troops carried them in.) The ban in the city was justified on religious grounds (even then, religion was a useful tool for the government!)

    Augustus extended to ban to Roman roads (to curb banditry - even then, there was the argument about "criminals versus citizens" where arms were concerned).

    (*a few special groups were armed, like the police and the Praetorian Guard... and of course gladiators in the Colosseum.)

    Just to clarify ;)

    DH
     
    Malum Prohibitum likes this.
  5. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Gypsies aren't the problem. The huge influx of northern African and mid-east "asylum seekers" is the problem. Italian ports were a major dropping off point for the "nice families" (strangely lacking many women and children) dumped there. Salvini and others campaigned - and won - on shutting down the NGOs using the ports. The island of Lampedusa was a major entry point. Now the vast majority of the traffic ends up in Spain but the Italians still have to deal with the "refugees" already there.
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Great post.

    Just to add a little, however, weapons were commonly carried - and used - anyway.

    Another result of the ban was mob political violence. It was easy to harm a political enemy just by sic'ing a gang of thugs upon him.

    1st century BC Roman politics were a very dirty business indeed.
     
  7. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Not unlike 21st century American politics, eh? :lol:
     
  8. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    We’re a ways from actual assassinations yet...
     
  9. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Not very far. Tried to make it Special Prosecutor investigation which failed and now moving on to committee investigation subpoenaing tax records and who knows where from there.

    Nemo
     
  10. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    John F. Kennedy (1963). Malcom X (1965). Robert F. Kennedy (1968 ). Martin Luther King (1968 ). 20th century but only ~50 years ago. More recently there's Vince Foster (1993) and Seth Rich (2016). Assassinations or conspiracies? Place your bets and take your chances.
     
  11. dhaller

    dhaller Active Member

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    The insight I finally came to about "bans", courtesy of the wisdom of my middle years, is that they're never really intended to *stop* whatever's banned, but rather to confer power to The State... "bans" are a key which can be used to open other doors.

    "You're carrying a weapon? I wonder what else you're carrying... oh, and we need to search your chariot, and probably your house, and your best friends' houses..." and so on.

    (Witness the power of the Broken Tail Light, as an example.)

    DH
     
  12. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Weapons were commonly carried in the provinces. Look at Luke 22:36-38. And then v. 51, as well.

    μάχαιραν

    If the Greek letters show up correctly, that is the word, anglicized as machairan. The root of this word is μάχη (literally, a "battle"). This is a war sword, not some knife. The word is literally used figuratively (see what I did there) to mean death. See Romans 13:4, where the same Greek word is used as a figure for capital punishment.

    The Latin word for the Roman soldier's sword is gladius. In Koine Greek, the gladius is referred to by the same Greek word above being used at the last supper. I have seen commentary, however, that by the first century the Greek word had become generic for sword and therefore many scholars do not attach much importance to the word as distinguishing among various types, for instance, local provincial swords, different in style, and the uniform sword (gladius) worn by the Roman foot soldier.