I have a question about how many rounds can you carry

Discussion in 'GA Laws and Politics' started by gunsmoke50, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. gunsmoke50

    gunsmoke50 New Member

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    In firearm deer season how many rounds can you legally keep in your rifle or handgun.Can I carry a rifle and a handgun at the same time like a 357 mag S&W or a 454 ruger for a snake gun or to put down a deer if its still alive.I just want a handgun on me because on one of the WMA's a body was dumped years ago it was Dawson Forest .I heard that alot of people grow pot in WMA's which isn't good. Say if I stepped into someone pot field I think I would get shot at. I want to know that I have enought firepower to get out of trouble if I need it. I just want to know the law on a second weapon carry and how many rounds can I have on me.I know some states limit how many you can have at one time.Is Georgia One of the states that do that?I'm first time hunter that is looking to bag a deer not a BG.
     
  2. pro2am

    pro2am New Member

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  3. gunsmoke50

    gunsmoke50 New Member

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    Pro2am my main question is if I can have a backup second weapon on me if i'm carrying a rifle on WMA"s is it legal. On the rounds question alot of states limit how many rounds you can carry on you or in the firearm. Is Georgia a one of the states that limit the rounds you can carry on WMA's.The DNR web site didn't help I have a hunting season regulation book It doesn't say if its legal or not.I hope Pro2am or MP can show me the law on this if there is one.
     
  4. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not aware of anything prohibiting a second weapon while hunting for deer during rifle season. The only ammunition capacity restrictions of which I am aware are for bird hunting.

    This is not a researched answer, but rather the result of my feeble, faulty memory.


    If the second gun is a firearm that would be legal for hunting anyway, I am not sure about what the DNR could complain.
     
  5. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    I actually get this question quite a bit from my students. The situation you are asking about is perfectly legal as long as the pistol is already legal for hunting purposes. I have included the relevant sections of the regulations below. You can also download a copy of the current regulations here.

     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    OK, so my memory is not so faulty.

    I never understood why WMAs refuse to allow buckshot. Buckshot should be perceived as safer than slugs or bullets. In some places in the northeast U.S. , it is all that is allowed.
     
  7. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    The reasoning is in the thought that hunters taking shots and distances they shouldn't with buckshot do not take into consideration the spread of the patern resulting in wounded game lost and safety concerns for other hunters. I'm not saying I agree with this line of thought, just explaining it...
     
  8. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    Assault Weapon Hunting

    I have hunted deer, successfully I may add, with a Springfield Armory MI-A, one of those deadly "assault weapons" that was banned 1994-2004. I used to hunt with the only magazine I had-- a 20-rounder. To save weight I would put less than half that many rounds into it, though. Then I got some aftermarket 10-round mags. I now use them for hunting. I only load 5 rounds in them, but if I felt like I needed 10, I'd load all 10. (Not to shoot at the same deer 10 times in a row, but in case I needed to protect myself from some wild hog, wounded bear, or homicidal human).

    As far as I can tell from reading the regulations, only shotgun hunters need to observe a magazine limit on their firearms, not rifle shooters.

    This year I got a deer at 260 yards. One shot, broadside, right in the X-ring, and it dropped the critter within a few leaps (about 50 feet).

    The last time I fired more than one shot at a group of deer, I fired three rounds at the two largest deer in a group of 3. Two shots at deer #1, and then one shot at deer #2. I took my time-- about 10 seconds for all 3 shots. Anybody with a bolt-action could have done the same thing. It's not rapid fire, even though the rifle is of the military battle rifle variety.
     
  9. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Assault Weapon Hunting

    There is an exception for deer, so no need to observe it for deer.
     
  10. jrm

    jrm Sledgehammer

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    There still is a limit for deer, but the limit is 5 instead of 3. For many older shotguns, the legal limit coincides with the magazine capacity. But, a lot of newer shotguns have capacities (chamber plus mag) of more than 5.
     
  11. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    silencers

    I see from the regs cited above that "silencers may not be used for hunting." That's a rule that ought to be changed. A few days ago I touched-off a .308 round from inside a permanent deer stand built of plywood and sheet metal. The muzzle (with a flash hider) of my weapon was a few inches INSIDE the room, firing out an open window. Let me tell you, that was not fun. My hearing was measurably degraded all that day. My ears are still ringing now. I hope the damage is not permanent.

    I'd hate to think what my buddy goes through when he fires that .338 Remington Ultra Mag. from inside such an enclosure.

    Next time, I'm wearing ear protection.

    The law should be changed to allow use of sound suppressors on major-caliber big game rifles. It's not going to "silence" them by any stretch of the imagination, but it could reduce the noise to something more like a .22 or .410 shotgun than the ear-splitting blast of a .30-06 class cartridge. Criminals would have no use for such suppressors, in those calibers, but hunters would.
     
  12. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Active Member

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    Gunsmoker,
    Part of your sound problem with the .308 may be due to the flash supressor especially if it is designed as a muzzle break as well. These have a tendancy to direct a lot of the sound back at the shooter and will definately cause hearing loss if shot without hearing protection. The BOSS systems on some rifles do the same thing and come with warnings all over the owners manual. Get yourself a Walkers "Game Ear". They block all the blast yet let you hear everything else normally. Protect your hearing while you still can! I wish I would have in my young and "bulletproof" days.... :banghead:
     
  13. jrm

    jrm Sledgehammer

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    While I think USMCR's suggestion is a good one until the law is changed, I agree with gunsmoker that there is no good reason for a prohibition on hunting with a silencer.

    I don't really understand the general disdain the law has for silencers. Other than James Bond or his nemesis occasionally deploying one for a hit, are there really nefarious uses for a silencer? It is so much more enjoyable to shoot, to teach someone to shoot, and to learn to shoot without the report. I have found that women who are new to shooting especially appreciate silencers. They are skeptical when you hand them a suppressed .22 and tell them there is no recoil and no bang, but pleasantly surprised to verify it.
     
  14. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Professional Troll

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    JRM, thanks yourself and Gunsmoker, you both now have me yearning to buy a silencer. Both of yours were very enjoyable to shoot.
     
  15. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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    I was about to answer that question when it struck me that all the reasons I can come up with are unfounded if you actually know about firearms, just like all the other accessories.

    Why would a bayonette lug for rifles be included that Assault Weapons Ban? When is the last time the news reported a mass bayonetting (the media says gangs love assault weapons, even though not factually true )?

    Same thing with the flash suppressor. Some actually believed that a flash suppressor was the same as a silencer. Others argued that they were only for hiding the flash from those you were shooting at. Which if you have a flash suppressor and shot at night you know that it is to keep yourself from being blinded by the flash, anyone around you will still see the flash.

    What do you expect when public, media, and even some politicians still think the AWB covered machine guns!!
     
  16. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    silencers for criminal use

    Some silencers on certain types of weapons in certain subsonic calibers can be very quiet, and thus there is a risk that under some circumstances the use of such a silencer would allow a crime to go undetected and unreported longer than if a silencer had not been used.

    Of course that doesn't mean that I agree they should be banned or restricted as severely as they are, but at least for those kinds of silencers, the anti-gunners would be correct in saying that they do have appeal to certain kinds of criminals and assassins.

    But as to centerfire rifles suitable for hunting big game, the term "silencer" is inappropriate. The weapon will not be silent. It will not sound like something else. There will be a report, and there will be a sharp supersonic crack as the .30 bullet travels downrange at 2,800 f.p.s. or whatever. It will sound at least as loud as a regular .22 rifle fired without any suppressor at all. Therefore criminals COULD NOT use one to commit a crime undetected. Only in rare instances would some neighbor or witness fail to call the cops upon hearing what sounds like a .22 being fired when that same person WOULD have called the cops if they heard what they thought was a larger-caliber weapon being fired.

    Big-game rifles present the most danger to hunters' hearing, and thus they ought to be legally outfitted with silencers for hunting. It would still be a sporting way to hunt, and upon one shot being fired the other animals nearby would hear it and react accordingly.
     
  17. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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    Well a knife, axe, baseball bat, or sword are silent too. The only difference is the distance. A subsonic silenced round is not going to be accurate at too far a distance.
     
  18. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    IIRC [somebody else will have to research it], the NFA originally included handguns. While handguns were dropped from the special tax status, silencers, machine guns, short barreled rifles and shotguns were not. I do not now recall how, but the AOW status for short barreled shotguns without a shoulder stock ($5 transfer tax instead of $200) grew out of the original handgun ban and subsquent amendment to remove them from the list (but leaving shotguns and other weapons with short barrels like a handgun).

    Anybody else have a reference handy or more complete info?