HOA Interpretation On Open Carry

Discussion in 'Places Off-Limits' started by torp, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    Can someone name a really good advantage that would make it worthwhile to live in a HOA neighborhood? Just trying not to be so closed-minded.
     
  2. Scout706

    Scout706 Well-Known Member

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    Curb appeal for selling.
     
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  3. awanatech

    awanatech Well-Known Member

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    I lived in an HOA community for about 7 years and won't do that again. However, many people enjoy having the neighborhood amenity areas. They enjoy the pool, tennis courts and playgrounds. Many also like the uniformity and knowing that their neighbor won't be able to leave their yard unkempt. They don't have to worry that the neighbor will paint the house 3 time tone pastels. While it's not for me, there are a lot of people who enjoy being under that level of control.
     
  4. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

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    I would think that in the event of a major messup a HOA community especially gated would have the same target level as a nuclear sub base.
     
  5. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Professional Troll

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    We put on a hell of a Independence Day fireworks show every year for the neighborhood.
     
  6. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    Shared structures (walls/floors/ceilings/parking) and/or private(ized) amenities such as parks, lake, pool, clubhouse, golf, tennis for the Libertarians.

    If it’s a gated community, no through traffic, tightly controlled litter, noise, traffic, higher degree of independence from local government, etc.
     
  7. torp

    torp New Member

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    Some of the things already mentioned here. Most of the time you hear people talking about covenants protecting the value of your home.
    It does prevent neighbors from putting a car on cinder blocks in the front yard.
    The amenities can be nice. The neighborhood we are moving to has yard service included with the monthly HOA. I'm getting old and lazy and this appealed to me.
    lol
     
  8. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    The primary negative impacts to the value of a home are foreclosures, schools, and crime. HOAs have surprisingly limited impact on those. YMMV, dealer retains tax and rebate, not valid anywhere, etc.
     
  9. jrm

    jrm Sledgehammer

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    That's certainly what seems to be said most often. I don't know how true it is in practice. I suspect it doesn't make that much difference, but I don't know.

    One thing no one has mentioned and that does not get talked about is that if you have a neighborhood with restrictive covenants, you do not have to have an HOA to enforce them. Every lot owner generally has the right to enforce them. The HOA can do it, and if they extort, sorry, collect enough money from everyone, then the HOA can "force" everyone to contribute to the cost of enforcement. But as I said above, a lot of HOAs rattle sabers but do not really enforce.

    Another common issue is that if the HOA is large enough, it can't really handle the administration of everything by itself, with volunteer part-time staff. Instead, the HOA hires a management company. Management companies operate on shoe-string budgets, and they seem to have an uncanny ability to make a mess out of things.
     
  10. rmodel65

    rmodel65 Yukon Cornelius

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    You'd never get me to buy. That's my ultimate deal breaker.
     
  11. awanatech

    awanatech Well-Known Member

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    There are a lot of people do find them appealing and won't buy into a neighborhood without one. And that's why we have variety in the market and choices as to where we buy and live.
     
  12. carnut

    carnut Member

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    With a HOA...
    You don't have to worry about a rental house 5 houses up being rented by a tree cutter that parks 5 of the trucks and chipper in the driveway and front lawn. Or 6 guys/gals renting a house behind you with 6-8 cars parked all over the property on non-party days. Also a landscaper moving in 3 houses up that clear cuts every tree on a once fully wooded acre, then parks trailers, backhoes and trucks all over the back yard. Seen all of this plus a lot more in our subdivision in past years they come and go. But the good part is... my basketball hoop, non-power washed driveway, 4 vehicles, wave runners and boat trailer shared the same subdivision plus no monthly fee. No I can't go into a HOA unless I sell my toys which not happen, hopefully till the lord takes me.. As far as re-sale, I bought for me , not the next guy, if you can't enjoy it, then your in the wrong house. nuff said.
     
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  13. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    I don’t need an HOA for that. It all violates county code!

    When I served on the board, somebody once asked the board to do something about the guy running a used car dealership out of a townhome. While it might have taken the HOA 6 months to settle it, code enforcement got it done in 48 hours! FWIW, don’t park 5 cars on the street amongst townhomes with limited parking. It really cheeses off the neighbors and most areas promoting townhome density already have rules about parking and home-based businesses having customers visit in person...
     
  14. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    So far almost everything mentioned is covered by ordnance in all cities and most most if not all counties. The only difference is code enforcement takes care of enforcing the codes and the cities take care of the streets. for the same amount you already pay in property taxes without the additional cost of paying the HOA nazis that will deny your kids a playhouse in your own back yard. the same HOA nazis that will deny your teen from having their own car parked on your own driveway because your two car garage is taken up with your and your spouses vehicles. Without the HOA you can have your own private pool and restrict access to it as you see fit and have the guest you want to enjoy it. You can also hold a wedding reception at YOUR own house and the guest can park in the street. You will note the "n" in nazi is not caps...
     
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  15. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

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    After reading the post here I appreciate even more just how fortunate I am to be able to live for the past 50 years in the middle of a large track of good old South Georgia woodland with none of the problems I have read about here. It is indeed My Kingdom. I admire those of you who live in those places as I would not last long there. As they say each to his own and much respect for personal choices.
     
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  16. ICP_Juggalo

    ICP_Juggalo Professional Troll

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    That's what we do in our neighborhood. We had a neighbor that bussed in a half a dozen of those Tuff Sheds that Home Depot sells and set them up in their backyard and moved people in them. We have it in our covenants that detached buildings aren't allowed to be used as dwellings and county ordinances also prohibit that as well. We let the property owner know what they were doing was against both the covenants and county ordinance. The property owner still proceeded, so instead of issuing fines or threatening legal action, I just called codes enforcement and they came out and fined the crap out of them. They were told to move all the people out of the buildings. If they wanted to be used as domiciles, then the property owner would need to find a way to physically connect the buildings to the house on the property. So the owner applied for permits to build a heated hallway to connect the buildings all to the main structure on the property.
     
  17. Craftsman

    Craftsman Well-Known Member

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    HOAs got started because developers were going out into undeveloped parts and building suburbs. These suburbs were past the city limits and the mostly rural counties had little or no code enforcement. Over time, the cities grew or were formed and counties updated codes and started enforcing them. This is a national phenomenon, not just something local. It continues today because developers keep reaching out further and further. Plus there is the management of common areas and amenities that cities have zero interest in maintaining.
     
  18. jsaund22

    jsaund22 Ninjaneering Computers

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    Amen.

    Although, over here on this end of our county, folks have started buying up the farmland and building houses. So I'm about to have a few more "neighbors" than I want. (If you can call somebody who lives half a mile away a "neighbor".)
     
  19. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    Can I just ask why that matters? I only care about direct effects to me and my property. If someone is repeatedly making too much noise, then I'll complain, but one loud obnoxious person can make more noise than 20 quiet people. But then it's the noise I'd be calling about, not the number of people.
     
  20. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    If occupancy exceeds sewer capacity or structures fail to meet building code, it does affect you...even if you don’t know it yet.
     
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