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To each is there own...

For me it's all about the tactical reload. Having that one in the pipe, just in case the need presents it's self to put one down range while reloading.
 

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Re: I Like It

gunsmoker said:
. . . I have to disarm myself and leave the weapon in my vehicle to go into a place where guns are prohibited by law. In those situations, which happens way too often to suit me, I usually drop the magazine and take it with me . . .
They let you get your magazine and ammunition past the metal detectors?
 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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sometimes

They did at an amusement park recently. They found my loaded magazine with the wand, but I simply told them that I thought it was safer for me to keep the ammo with me and leave the gun unloaded in the car, rather than putting the magazine back in the same location as the gun (locked in my vehicle, which they said was permissible under their corporate policy). I gave them the choice, but told them what was the safest and most prudent course of action in MY OPINION, and they chose to follow my suggestion.

(of course they could have taken a different course of action-- they could have told me to remove my firearm from their property entirely and not come back until my vehicle was weapon-free. But they they would have lost all that money I spent that day (except for the parking fee I'd already paid)).

At the Cobb County courthouse a few years back I simply handed my speedloader full of .38 special hollowpoints to the deputy as I walked through the metal detector. At first he told me I would have to take them back out to my car, but again I convinced him that it was not the wisest move. However, he wouldn't let me walk around the courthouse with live ammo (why not? Did he think I would grab one firmly between my fingers and then jab the point of a ballpoint pen into the primer, thus shooting someone without using a gun?).

Instead, he kept my speedloader at the security checkpoint and I picked it up on my way out of the building.

The next time I visited the courthouse, I left the gun loaded in my glove box. Nobody stole it, nor the 5-foot diamondback rattlesnake that I left on the passenger's seat either. (Just Kidding)
 

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Re: sometimes

gunsmoker said:
Did he think I would grab one firmly between my fingers and then jab the point of a ballpoint pen into the primer, thus shooting someone without using a gun?).
Very firmly.

Typically a cartridge will not expel the bullet when the primer is struck on an unsupported case. Rather the case ruptures and sends fragments outward.

The weight of the bullet typically anchors it in place pretty well.

Not that I want to stand in front of one when you try it, but I think it would be mnore dangerous to be the one holding the cartridge then to be the intended victim in front of the bullet.
 

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Sledgehammer
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Discussion Starter #25
Mythbusters had an episode where they used .22 rounds as fuses in a car (in a car that used the older barrel type fuses), then intentionally overloaded the circuit to cause the rounds to fire. They had mixed results, but one thing that was clear was that nothing near normal muzzle velocities was achieved. in most cases, the bullet was forced out of the shell, but without significant velocity.
 

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jrm said:
Mythbusters had an episode where they used .22 rounds as fuses in a car (in a car that used the older barrel type fuses), then intentionally overloaded the circuit to cause the rounds to fire. They had mixed results, but one thing that was clear was that nothing near normal muzzle velocities was achieved. in most cases, the bullet was forced out of the shell, but without significant velocity.
I think their job would be a lot of fun.

Little 22s are the firecrackers of ammunition, though. A ruptured rifle shell is a different story entirely.

I once saw an M-16 receiver burst in half during full auto fire. An unsupported case is no laughing matter. Nobody injured.
 

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STORY TIME...AND OFF TOPIC. At a live fire range at Camp Lejuine I have also seen a ruptured cartridge. But on a .50 cal round. You can tell when this happens by an autible pop and reduced recoil. And this happened while in the chamber of the "Ma Duce". Most likely it was bad ammo. But that is why the invented the Ruptured cartridge extractor for that weapon.

What is even less fun then a ruptured cartridge is... Having "fire out of battery". It's when the Ojive (Granade) is stuck inside the barrel. This happens for the same reason ie: bad ammo. You have to get a round removal tool and it's a pain and not fun. Don't ask me how I know. Luckly I wasn't the guy that had to get the Ojive out. I was a young devil pup and in infantry school (SOI, machine gunner portion of the course).
 

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Not meaning to disrupt this thread and move back to it's topic, but...

I have mixed feelings about the magazine disconnect. If I were about to lose my weapon, it would be a great idea. If in a fire fight and I shoot my weapon dry, it is a moot point. If I am trying to make a tactile reload, I do not think it would become an issue. I would not make a tactile reload unless I was confident it was feasible to do so.

In the for-what-it-is-worth category, an S&W model 4006 can be manipulated to fire w/o the magazine, even tho it has a magazine disconnect. Before dropping the magazine, put a LITTLE pressure on the trigger, and maintain it until the fresh magazine is inserted. If the gun was needed, it could then be fired. NOTE: I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS, RATHER PROVIDE IT AS INFORMATION AS TO A PECULIARITY IN A DESIGN. IT WOULD BE EASY TO HAVE AN ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE WITHOUT A GREAT DEAL OF PRACTICE. EVEN WITH THIS PRACTICE, AN ACCIDENTAL DISCHARGE IS STILL POSSIBLE.
 
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