Georgia Firearm Forums - Georgia Packing banner
1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
69,784 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2014 story

http://www.wrdw.com/home/headlines/More-felons-owning-guns-272948891.html

More convicted felons in Georgia own firearms now. The Georgia Pardons and Paroles board granting them the right to bear arms again.

The right to bear arms. Not necessarily a right for everyone like a convicted felon, but more of them are getting that right back.

"I got caught up in the lifestyle. I guess and I felt invincible like nothing would happen to me," said a convicted felon.

Eight years ago it did. The mother of 5 was arrested for possession of cocaine and she spent two years in jail.

"I should have the right that if somebody breaks in my front door . . .​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
I have no problem with it. From what I read on the website, they have to provide references and been out of parole etc and trouble for five years. After all if I don't trust you with a gun you should be in jail
 

·
Seasteading Aficionado
Joined
·
44,900 Posts
I've got no problem with people outside of prison or jail having a firearm.

If they are too dangerous to be trusted with a firearm we should have never let them out of prison.

Do you know how easy it is to get an illegal black market gun in America? Always will be no matter what laws are in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
If we don't treat these rights as inalienable, no one will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
I've got no problem with people outside of prison or jail having a firearm.

If they are too dangerous to be trusted with a firearm we should have never let them out of prison.
It is amazing to me how many people are willing to trample someone's 8th amendment right to ensure their 2nd amendment right. What you are essentially stating is lifetime imprisonment for pretty much every felony conviction because we really can't be 100% certain they won't never, ever do anything bad again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
A lot does depend on the crime and the number of convictions. But my father always told me "the last person who was perfect they nailed to a cross".

The justice system itself is far from perfect
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,956 Posts
I'm not sure I see why she was locked up to begin with.
How many "laws" are there in the US? Between federal statutes, regulations, case law, common law, state laws and local laws I'm pretty certain the number is unknowable. How does one live a normal life without the slightest chance of breaking some law somewhere. Victimless crimes or not they all share a common underpinning - the desire of someone to exercise control over someone else. Ayn Rand was very correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,956 Posts
Buddy Lichty, owner of Shooters Augusta has the right to refuse business to anybody felon or not and when he heard more felons are getting guns.

"My knee jerk reaction like a lot of people would be hell no. Once convicted always a felon, but there's that other side. They may be they served their time maybe they are rehabilitated," Lichty said.
And maybe you're a stalwart defender of the 2nd Amendment. Or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
It is amazing to me how many people are willing to trample someone's 8th amendment right to ensure their 2nd amendment right. What you are essentially stating is lifetime imprisonment for pretty much every felony conviction because we really can't be 100% certain they won't never, ever do anything bad again.
I read that differently. Either the person has "paid their debt to society" and has regained their rights, or has committed a crime so severe that they cannot be trusted to walk among free people. There are way too many "crimes" considered felonies today for the law to be anything approaching just and fair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
I read that differently. Either the person has "paid their debt to society" and has regained their rights, or has committed a crime so severe that they cannot be trusted to walk among free people. There are way too many "crimes" considered felonies today for the law to be anything approaching just and fair.
So you would have no problem with someone who committed robbery or aggravated assault using a handgun and getting sentences to 10 years in prison and after serving those 10 years, you would trust him enough that he would legally be able to purchase a weapon? I am sorry, I don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
So you would have no problem with someone who committed robbery or aggravated assault using a handgun and getting sentences to 10 years in prison and after serving those 10 years, you would trust him enough that he would legally be able to purchase a weapon? I am sorry, I don't.
A. I wouldn't.
B. If our prisons weren't little more than felon factories built to serve the prison-industrial complex rather than justice, I'm sure you and others would yoo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
I guess you are a better man than I am.

So how would you fix the "Prison-Industrial Complex"?
By focusing on rehab rather than just punishment. It will be a long-term process. I'm not saying just open the doors of Florence ADX and put all of them in college. Start with the low-level offenders. Rehab them from the beginning so they don't become high-level offenders. Separate people by crime. Don't stuff white-collar "bad check writers" in with rapists and murderers. Keep some things off of criminal records upon release (first-time drug possession, failure to appear for a traffic ticket, that kind of thing) so on release, they aren't kept out of work. The idea is to keep people from turning into hardened criminals by not treating them like hardened criminals from the get-go.

Norway seems to be a good model. I'm sure there are intricacies in both systems that keep us from being able to just copy-paste it here, but it sounds like a good start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
By focusing on rehab rather than just punishment. It will be a long-term process. I'm not saying just open the doors of Florence ADX and put all of them in college. Start with the low-level offenders. Rehab them from the beginning so they don't become high-level offenders. Separate people by crime. Don't stuff white-collar "bad check writers" in with rapists and murderers. Keep some things off of criminal records upon release (first-time drug possession, failure to appear for a traffic ticket, that kind of thing) so on release, they aren't kept out of work. The idea is to keep people from turning into hardened criminals by not treating them like hardened criminals from the get-go.

Norway seems to be a good model. I'm sure there are intricacies in both systems that keep us from being able to just copy-paste it here, but it sounds like a good start.
I agree with what you are saying here but I still don't see how this addresses violent individual's once they have completed their sentences and released. It may reduce the total number of these types of people but it won't eliminate them.

I still don't want these types of people to be able to legally own a firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I still don't want these types of people to be able to legally own a firearm.
You don't mind them being in the community as long as they are not legally able to purchase a gun?

Bad people will find a way to do bad things, either illegally obtaining a firearm or using some other weapon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
You don't mind them being in the community as long as they are not legally able to purchase a gun?
I didn’t say that at all. Under current sentencing guidelines, there are very few felonies that require life in prison (pretty much only murder for the most part but since I am no expert I am not going to say that is the only one). Therefore, you will always have felons who are still dangerous that have served their sentences and are free to go. Do you really want them to be able to LEGALLY buy a firearm? I don’t.

Bad people will find a way to do bad things, either illegally obtaining a firearm or using some other weapon.
1
00% agree. But you don’t have to make it easy or legal for them either.
 

·
what me worry?
Joined
·
6,504 Posts
If they did there time they should have all there rights restored. If there dangerous they shouldn't be free but in our country when does the punishment end?
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top