Georgia Governor Declares State of Emergency Over Drought

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by ls1ssdavid, Oct 20, 2007.

  1. ls1ssdavid

    ls1ssdavid New Member

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    With water supplies rapidly shrinking during a drought of historic proportions, Gov. Sonny Perdue declared a state of emergency Saturday for the northern third of Georgia and asked President Bush to declare it a major disaster area.

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,303769,00.html

    So state of emergency... time to go buy some extra rounds and buy bottled water ehh?
     
  2. merlock

    merlock Active Member

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    SOunds like a good enough reason to me...
     

  3. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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    I guess that also means he can prohibit the carry of firearms if he felt like it.
     
  4. Fallschirmjäger

    Fallschirmjäger I watch the watchers

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  5. blind_shake

    blind_shake Well-Known Member

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    So does this mean we can send all the fugees back to New Orleans? :cheers:


    Oh and where's my FEMA debit Card???!!! :soapbox:
     
  6. adcurt

    adcurt New Member

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    Anyone notice how few mosquitos there are? :) Hoo-rah for drought!! Where do I stand to get my check?

    Hey Lawyers: I don't even THINK that this is a good idea, but I'm really curious about a State's rights in this case:

    Does the Governor have the legal authority to deploy the State Guard to seize the dam from the Federal Government? Assuming that all legal avenues have ended and the state is 10 days (or something immediate like that) from running out of water.

    Just curious how that works.
     
  7. viper32cm

    viper32cm New Member

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    That very course of action was suggested by one of my classmates. Being liberal, though he seems quasi-pro gun, he used this as an opportunity to bash Sonny, calling him an idiot. I guess he thought we should have done more sooner. After reading a lot of this stuff I'm not sure that's deserved.

    He also mentioned something about FEMA getting water trucks ready for N. Georgia.
     
  8. Vir Quisque Vir

    Vir Quisque Vir New Member

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    Big Three, an attempt at dry humor

    The big three are not Ford, Chevrolet and Chrysler. The real big three are AIR, WATER and FOOD, pretty much in that order. Maybe we need a few more reservoirs to tap the rain and keep a bit more of it. Of course we need to feed the clams and sturgeon in Florida first. :shock: When we have about 12-15 inches of rain deficit several of the past few years, what it meant to me is that I got to take the big JD in the first (DRY!)pond and MOW and clean up the trees on the dam. It seems like the politicians might look sometime at the lake levels to see that Atlanta has only about 81 days or so of water left for human use. That is if the Corps does not drain the rest of it out first. This is sort of the opposite case of when you are up to your arse in alligators, you kind of forget that the object was to drain the swamp. The swamp is about dry! Please contact your congressman and senator and tell them you have become accustomed to drinking water and you just can't break the habit. Of course they will tell you to start recycling urine. You process about 0,.5-1.0 ml a MINUTE, 24 hours a day. Waste not, want not. Then you can tell them we can use what they are producing to put on our crops and grass, if we just had the water to do it. :lol:
     
  9. Firearmz

    Firearmz New Member

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    I have a question? If we can build a pipe line from Alaska to the lower 48 why can't we pump desalinated water from the coast?
     
  10. N.T.F.S.

    N.T.F.S. Active Member

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    I asked this slightly sarcastic question in another post but it seems appropriate to ask here. When we are all waiting on line at the FEMA trucks with a bucket to get our daily supply of drinking water, would that be considered a public gathering?
     
  11. Thorsen

    Thorsen New Member

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    It could be done. But desalination plants churn through a lot of energy. I had always thought along your lines of thought until I looked into what it took to make sea water drinkable.

    The only things I can think of that would be helpful at this point is massive construction of large scale wells throughout the northern portion of Georgia. Not a long term solution, but it would buy some time while better minds than mine try to figure our way out of this situation.

    Our primary problem is that we simply do not have large rivers and continued construction and growth in nothern Georgia is simply outpacing our water resources. While I agree that we should stop worrying about the endangered mussels and sturgeons downstream, we will still have to release a large quantity of water as there are two power plants built on the rivers downstream of the Altanta area, one of which is nuclear.

    No easy answer for this problem and politicians have been dodging it like crazy for years. The cyclical nature of droughts and the expansion of our population has finally caught up with us and unless we start to get a lot of rain, and get it fast, expect to see water rationing get implemented with water only being available for certain hours of the day, or even certain days of the week.
     
  12. Thorsen

    Thorsen New Member

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    Ok, that was funny :lol:
     
  13. N.T.F.S.

    N.T.F.S. Active Member

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    because that would make to much sense. Second because some wacko environmentalists would say that the pipe line would disturb some crusty sand crab mound or a marsh tit along the way.

    what we need is someone to come up with dehydrated water in a can. just open, add water and presto. :wink:
     
  14. Firearmz

    Firearmz New Member

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    When I was in the Middle East these desalination plants were very common, used all the time. Navy ships and submarines use them also. Maybe war for water is the answer lol, hows Russia looking as far as rain fall lately?
     
  15. gsusnake

    gsusnake Token Liberal Hippie

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    Makes me glad I don't live on Lake Lanier any more.
     
  16. ls1ssdavid

    ls1ssdavid New Member

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    My question is how many of yall have started purchasing bottled water to save? I don't think we are all going to dehydrate to death. But for basic needs like brushing teeth or quick towel shower. I'm thinking normal bottled water, or other bottled liquids like alcohol, gaterade, still has to be trucked in.

    We don't have that Katrina bill passed yet do we? If it gets that crazy who knows. I don't think Perdue would do it. But... dang I don't even like thinking about it. Who knows if the Chiefs of Police would even enforce it. I know Atlanta Police Department Chief would probobly do it :roll: . That guy brought the problems over from New Orleans. If you don't know he was the Chief of Police in New Orleans for a while before this newer guy took over (so he's not the famous one from the Katrina deal). But he might have like tendencys.
     
  17. moonchicken

    moonchicken New Member

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    This happened in Puerto Rico back in '94 when I used to live there (I was in high school at the time). The rationing lasted for a couple of months. You get used to waking up at 3 in the morning to take a shower, do laundry, fill up the water containers, flush toilets (if you hadn't done so with your stored water), and whatever else you need to do in the few hours of the day that you actually have running water. They assigned different water service intervals to different areas. Where my parents live, it was from about 1 am to 5 am. And because of the start/stop flow through the pipelines, water usually came out a little brownish.
    But I don't recall any rioting or civil unrest in the streets when that plan was implemented.

    BTW, this topic motivated me to go this afternoon and stock up on bottled water. Now I need to get more ammo...they don't sell any at Target. :lol:
     
  18. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    That's a textbook PG, if you ask me.
     
  19. GAGunOwner

    GAGunOwner Active Member


    I'm not a lawyer but to put in plain and simple the governor does not have this authority. The action taken by the federal gov't (releasing too much water) is authorized by it's Constitutional authority (at least as currently interpreted). This means that the "supremacy clause" kicks in. The "supremacy clause" basically means that the U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land and that federal laws hold precedent over state constitutions and laws.

    Just as a side note, the State Guard (Georgia State Defense Force) is currently unarmed. Not much they could do in a tactical situation.
     
  20. moonchicken

    moonchicken New Member

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    [sarcasm]
    But...but...aren't they supposed to be the "militia" which the 2nd Amendment refers to?
    [/sarcasm]

    Seriously though, I'm curious as to why are they unarmed. Could you please elaborate?