GCO, and NORML, and SAF! Oh, my!

Discussion in 'Off-topic Political' started by Mrs_Esterhouse, Oct 10, 2010.

  1. Mrs_Esterhouse

    Mrs_Esterhouse Swollen Member

    11,828
    503
    113
    I wanted to take a moment to explain why these three organizations are so important to our freedoms.

    GCO:
    This one goes without saying for most of us. GCO, is the most pro gun, pro carry, no apologies Second amendment organization in Georgia. They have sued countless municipalities and agencies who have violated the rights of law abiding Georgia citizens as well as defended the rights of citizens from erroneous law suites brought on by ill informed or wantonly disobedient government agencies. GCO is frequently a protector of not only the Second amendment, but the First, Fourth and Fifth as well.

    NORML:
    The National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) and the NORML Foundation are the most active marijuana legalization organizations in the U.S. I maintain, marijuana use is a victimless crime that hurts no one, not even the user. We must stop wasting billions of tax payer dollars and destroying millions of American lives over a substance that does not harm but, in fact, has many medical benefits, especially for those with terminal illnesses. To help bring about legalization, I am a member of the NORML "Foundation". There is a difference. I do not want my NORML donation used to fund the campaigns of politicians like Barny Frank. The NORML Foundation is a 501(c)3 organization that sponsors public advertising campaigns designed to inform the public about the costs of marijuana prohibition and the benefits of alternative policies; distributes a weekly press release to the national media and citizen activists focusing on recent developments pertaining to marijuana research and policy; publishes a regular newsletter; provides legal assistance and support to victims of the current marijuana laws; undertakes relevant research; and hosts, with NORML, an informative web site and an annual conference.

    SAF:
    The Second Amendment Foundation is THE most effective, no compromise, no apologies national gun rights group in the U.S. The SAF strives for more where the NRA says, good enough. In McDonald vs Chicago, the SAF was adamant about winning the case under the "Privileges and Immunities" clause. The NRA was complacent with winning under "Due Process", a weaker incorporation method. Also, the SAF does not work to undermine pro gun, pro Second amendment legislation as the NRA has done with HB915, HB89 and SB308; instead, they embrace such legislation.

    If you love freedom and self governance, I would encourage you to look into joining these three organizations which fight for those principals.
     
  2. jdh31313

    jdh31313 Active Member

    2,532
    0
    36
    NORML...I don't disagree that marijuana laws need reform. If legalized, I would not partake but don't care if you / others do. I guess my issue with our drug laws and marijuana in particular is that marijuana accounts for about 90% of our narco-traffic and how much money we spend and have spent on the "war on drugs". If legalized, we would cut illegal traffic across the border and save a ton of money which could be used to pay down the deficit.
     

  3. Mrs_Esterhouse

    Mrs_Esterhouse Swollen Member

    11,828
    503
    113
    So maybe NOLM instead... I like it! :D
     
  4. kwikrnu

    kwikrnu Banned

    1,639
    0
    0
    I'm not a member of any of those organizations. The GCO definately seems more protective of the Second Amendment, but it may have something to do with their lawyer.
     
  5. sirkut

    sirkut Member

    880
    0
    16
    I think pot should be legal. When was the last time you heard someone smoke a joint and go home and beat their wife? I know alcohol does that...
     
  6. spector

    spector New Member

    1,849
    0
    0
    Totally agree with all those groups -- very good groups dedicated to protecting our liberties.

    I probably don't want money going to fund Barney Frank, either, but he DID sponsor this HR 2943: http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-2943 and I've gotta give him credit for that.

    That's the only bill of on the table (that I know of) that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. I wonder if it'll go anywhere, or die in committee, like it's predecessor.

    I like the distinction between NORML foundation and NORML itself.
     
  7. Puffyfish

    Puffyfish New Member

    1,182
    0
    0

    [​IMG] man has a point, a valid one.
     
  8. Mrs_Esterhouse

    Mrs_Esterhouse Swollen Member

    11,828
    503
    113
    To clarify for others, donations to NORML can be used for lobbying and, therefore, are not tax-deductible, where gifts to the NORML Foundation are restricted to educational and legal projects and are deductible. The NORML Foundation is a 501(c)3 while regular NORML is not. The end result, a membership to the NORML "Foundation" guarantees your dues won't go to political campaigns.
     
  9. Mrs_Esterhouse

    Mrs_Esterhouse Swollen Member

    11,828
    503
    113
    Actually, since the regular NORML and NORML Foundation are non-profits, they can't donate to campaigns, only "NORML PAC" can.

    The NORML PAC is the political arm of NORML that permits us to provide campaign contributions to office holders and candidates for public office who support NORML-friendly public policy and legislation.

    As you probably know, non-profit corporations, such as NORML and the NORML Foundation, cannot by law provide any support, financial or otherwise, to candidates or office holders. NORML can lobby aggressively for legislative change and support voter initiatives, and the NORML Foundation can undertake educational and philanthropic work that supports and reinforces our policy goals, but neither organization is permitted to provide support for or opposition to candidates for public office.


    Hmm, I might have to become a regular NORML member next year...
     
  10. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

    44,830
    186
    63
    NORML is a very good organizations that I agree with. Mary Jane certainly needs to be legalized.

    To me, it goes hand in hand with personal freedoms.
     
  11. cherok

    cherok New Member

    509
    0
    0
    Thanks for putting that out there Mrs. E! Couldn't agree more! These border killings would all but stop if we would legalize. It's amazing that we, as a country, don't want to stop this heinous and senseless violence... Instead we are perfectly happy to have (and create) dozens of "Al Capone" types not just south of the border, but in our communities as well. Hopefully prop. 19 will pass in California and the US will see that the sky isn't falling!
     
  12. RickN

    RickN New Member

    307
    0
    0
    Legalizing pot will not stop coke and heroin trafficking. So, it will not 'all but stop' the border killing nor get rid of the Al Capone types. It will simply remove pot from the equation and leave the big-money, big-violence drugs in play.

    Don't oversell your case.
     
  13. rankhornjp

    rankhornjp Active Member

    4,543
    4
    36
    Not quite....I drink often and I've never beat my wife. Its not the drug, its the man....
     
  14. spector

    spector New Member

    1,849
    0
    0
    It is estimated that 90% of the revenues from drug-trafficking organized crime comes from marijuana, despite the reputation for cocaine and heroin as being big-money drugs. The profit margins may be higher, but marijuana wins in sheer volume (it is one of the world's largest cash crops). Don't underestimate the facts.
     
  15. spector

    spector New Member

    1,849
    0
    0
    Absolutely. And gun owners should remember that, federally, "users" of marijuana are prohibited from exercising their second amendment rights. How that is constitutional beats me, but if you care about gun rights, you probably shouldn't be keen on the idea of the government denying an entire class of people the right to self-defense.
     
  16. RickN

    RickN New Member

    307
    0
    0
    90% of Mexican border drug trafficking revenue -- the specific area we're talking about -- is from pot?. I don't believe it. Citation? Show me a fact before accusing me of "underestimating" it.

    Googling "drug trafficking mexico" brings up numerous discussions on the huge amounts of coke and meth involved, but not much on marijuana. If the pot problem so overshadowed all of the others (since legalizing pot will apparently put drug lords out of business and all but stop the border violence) you'd think there would be a lot written about it.

    I have no problem with legalizing pot, but saying that doing so will "all but stop" the border violence is ridiculous, IMHO.
     
  17. spector

    spector New Member

    1,849
    0
    0
    Sorry, I was mistaken -- it is 60%: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 03847.html ("$8.6 billion out of $13.8 billion in 2006 — came from U.S. marijuana sales, according to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.")

    Still, a highly substantial number. Legalizing marijuana alone will not completely stop border violence, but it will help reduce the power and resources of the drug cartels far more than threats of incarceration. Ultimately, ending the drug war entirely will be necessary, just as we ended prohibition. There are no gang shoot outs at the border between Dos Equis and Budweiser, and there is a reason for that.
     
  18. rabbivj

    rabbivj My Name is Inigo Montoya

    4,023
    13
    38
    ehh prop 19 may pass but Federal law still supercedes federal law in this aspect...and it isnt California...its known as the PRK...remember that...:)