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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who among us owns a .22 LR rifle and would like to try it in a match?
I shot a 50-foot "NRA Light Rifle" match a few days ago, for the first time ever,
and it was fun. I did pretty well, since I actually practice shooting from the standing / unsupported offhand position. So many shooters I know are dependent on bipods or shooting benches.

For folks who like shooting from the SITTING (or Kneeling) and PRONE positions, there are matches that feature using rimfire rifles in those ways, as well as standing. Some matches for .22 rifles are prone-only, but I've seen those guys shoot-- they can keep groups the size of a dime at 50 yards. I don't know if I want to even try to play that came and run with those big dogs, knowing I'll come in last.

Finally, Riverbend Gun Club in Dawsonville (also close to Canton and Cumming) has a "200 yard rimfire" match a few times per year, and it's shot from the prone position, all slow-fire (over one minute per shot). They even put up two targets to account for the huge bullet drop at 200 yards. If your gun is properly sighted-in at 100 yards, you should be able to aim at the top bullseye you see at 200 yards and the bullets will drop into the black of the lower target, a few feet directly below it. Of course you may have to make a few minor adjustments of your sights to make your groups well-centered that day, but you'll be in the scoring rings with your first shot.

I'm open to going to other gun clubs and ranges if some of you have a favorite place in mind.

Who wants to go shooting together?

-Kurt-
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
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This pic is from the Riverbend Gun Club's website, in the "Shooting Venues" section,
in the "200 yard rimfire" subsection.
That's me in the blue cap, with my modified 10/22 with aperture sights front and rear,
in a Fajen Legacy adjustable stock. I didn't win, or even come close, but I got a lot more hits in the black than in the white!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
P.S. The NRA "Light Rifle" category is the simplest, and requires the least gear or specialized equipment.

Just have any .22 rifle with any sights or scope, that weighs less or equal to 8.5 lbs.
The trigger pull has to be at least 2 lbs. They have scales and trigger weights and will check each gun before it can be used in the "light rifle" match.

You can shoot any .22LR ammo, and at 50 feet I don't think the quality of the ammo matters much. What's going to count is how steady you can hold the rifle and how well you can use "trigger control" to break the shot when the sights are in a good position and not when your sights have drifted out into the 7-ring (in the white).

No fancy shooting coats or gloves are required, or even allowed. No slings-- if your rifle is equipped with a sling, just don't use it. Don't wrap it around your arm.

You don't need a shooting mat, or a spotting scope. But if you are shooting a rifle with iron sights, you may want to use a spotting scope or monocular or even a detached rifle scope, or a pair of binoculars, to check your shots on the target. Each target has 6 bullseyes, and the top center one is always designated for "sighter shots" -- warm up shots or just practice shots, which you can do any time you want during the match.

You don't need a rifle with any special match barrel, 11-degree target crown, broach-cut rifling, etc.
The only important feature of the rifle is that it ought to have a pretty light trigger. The rules say 2.0 lbs minimum, and I'd suggest no more than 4.5 lbs. maximum. It should be crisp, too. No creep or overtravel, if possible.

All guns have to be single-loaded, either directly in the chamber OR by putting just one round in the magazine and then chambering it.
 

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I would love to! I have a scoped bolt action 22LR that I would love to put through its paces.

However, due to family growing circumstances I would have a hard time justifying with my wife for getting out until summer or fall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Frank, your dry fire computer software should be really helpful for this.
I think dry firing from the unsupported standing position is more beneficial than when you plan on shooting from other positions.

I hope you get to do some dry fire practicing and maybe shoot one of these matches in the fall.
 
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Frank, your dry fire computer software should be really helpful for this.
I think dry firing from the unsupported standing position is more beneficial than when you plan on shooting from other positions.

I hope you get to do some dry fire practicing and maybe shoot one of these matches in the fall.
I think so too. With pistols, I shot a 486/500 last month and a 483/500 this month with a course that included 75 ft. Was patterning a little high meaning I need to work on my sight picture and or I might be healing a bit but my left/right bias was really good and centered. This is all from dry firing nearly nightly for the last 8 months with relatively little live fire outside of a few range trips and shooting the monthly matches.
 

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I need to look up if my 22 rifle can safely be dryfired or not. I could always practice with my 30-06 as a stand in for that practice :)
 

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I would say that it should be. .22wmr tends to be less accurate than .22lr, because of ammo availability. I don't think it would have an unfair advantage unless you were shooting unknown distances. But I don't have a dog in the fight, because if this event happens it will be farther than I am willing to travel.
 

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Hmmmmm…. 🤔🤔🤔
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Is .22 magnum acceptable? If so, I’d participate if I can fit it on my calendar.

I had to look this up.

The NRA's Smallbore Rifle Rules book seems to designate 22 rimfire matches as being non-magnum types only. They specify short long and long rifle. It doesn't say magnums are allowed so I would assume they are not.

Quote: "Light Rifle - Any .22 caliber rimfire (.22 Short, .22 Long, or .22 Long Rifle) with not less than a 2 pound trigger pull and which weighs not more than 8 1⁄2 pounds when equipped with sights."
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would say that it should be. .22wmr tends to be less accurate than .22lr, because of ammo availability. I don't think it would have an unfair advantage unless you were shooting unknown distances.

I agree that a 22 magnum would not give you any accuracy advantage at 50 feet, and I actually don't think it would have an advantage at 50 yards either. (possible advantage during windy conditions, due to bullet that travels at nearly twice the velocity and thus is exposed to the wind for a much shorter period of time?)

But I think the NRA's smallbore rifle rules are made in contemplation of other matches fired at longer distances. Such as 100 meters for smallbore metallic silhouettes. So, no 22 magnums in an official NRA smallbore match.

Unsanctioned "club matches" may allow 22 magnums and the 17 Hornady magnum rimfire, or at least have a separate division for competitors using that kind of equipment.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'd go to a unsanctioned match --if some shooting club is holding it within a reasonable distance of where I live, and if other Georgia Packing members want to attend it.
 

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@gunsmoker The Mantis X does in fact have a rifle mode and came with a handy clamp adapter to mount it to the barrel on traditional rifle without a rail system! I did check on my rimfire rifle manual and it says NO DRY FIRE (unless snap caps are used, which I don't have any handy). However, I did pull out my hunting 30-06 and was able to attach it easily. Another great way to practice dry before season :) Interestingly the rifle mode has a USMC qualification course with seven drills at 200, 300, and 500 yards.

I tried my hand at standing and to that is definately something I would need some practice with to do well. Very humbling to see just how much the rifle moves around trying to support it. I've only ever hunted from a stand where I was able to steady the rifle so this would be very good practice indeed.
 

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Standing?

Now try it running using available cover. Stop. Mag dump on multiple targets still utilizing any cover available. Kneel and reload while your partner runs forward and mag dump. Then you run forward and mag dump while he is kneeling behind cover to reload . . . .

Best done on a city street with lots of parked cars to hide behind. See the ending shootout from Den of Thieves.

Mantis X capable of that?
 
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Standing?

Now try it running using available cover. Stop. Mag dump on multiple targets still utilizing any cover available. Kneel and reload while your partner runs forward and mag dump. Then you run forward and mag dump while he is kneeling behind cover to reload . . . .

Best done on a city street with lots of parked cars to hide behind. See the ending shootout from Den of Thieves.

Mantis X capable of that?
You can certainly practice parts of that in isolation. Dry fire from various stances scored and mag change drills. With a self resetting dry fire mag you can do multiple scored dry shots without cycling the bolt manually.

Team tactics would be harder :p
 

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Team tactics would be harder :p
My church security team practiced room clearing - and we happened to have a guy with more than one tour in the Middle East who just happened to have been assigned to teaching building entry and room clearing as one of his Army jobs.

So . . .

Let's just say that things have changed a lot since I was a police officer. We really need to get us all together again for more practice. It is completely different now from what we used to do way back when.
 
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