Foster Agency Position on Guns

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Malum Prohibitum, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://www.salem-news.com/articles/july ... _71907.php
     

  2. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    Good Reversal

    That Oregon agency's policy was too broad. However, I think it is legitimate to ask foster families if they have a plan on how to keep dangerous instruments and tools out of the hands of young children (unless part of a training / gun education program). Ditto for alochol, tobacco, prescription drugs ( Xanex, Lorcet, Valium, etc.) and pornography. If you have any of that stuff in your house, and you want to have other people's children placed in your house, you had better be able to explain how you're going to keep the kiddies out of the adult stuff.
     
  3. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Good Reversal

    Yeah, but somehow I think "Wear it openly in a holster, that's how," just won't ever cut it with the kinds of people that run these agencies.
     
  4. ber950

    ber950 Active Member

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    Re: Good Reversal

    I can tell you that from experience.
     
  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Friends HAVE told me that from experience.
     
  6. Thorsen

    Thorsen New Member

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    My brother has two small boys, the older is 3.5 and the younger is 1 year old. While the younger obviously can not get into too much just yet, the older is hell on wheels. Simply telling him not to ever touch his dad's firearm would never be enough, so my brother keeps his loaded home protection firearm in a biometric handgun safe on his nightstand, with the remainder of his weapons locked away out of reach and seperated from his ammo.

    I think that is a compromise that keeps his children safe from their curiosity while still providing him with the means to protect his family if necessary. I could see such a rule being applied to a foster home as it is reasonable, but never a total ban, nor a complete disarmament by making the weaponry so unavailable to immediate need that it simply becomes useless.
     
  7. Mafuta54

    Mafuta54 Active Member

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    My wife and I have 8 children, all of which bounced off the walls (especially after sugar) and ran us ragged, yet none of them ever played with my guns even though they knew where they were. I started them on firearm education practice when they were very young (about 2).
     
  8. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    It's not unreasonable for firearms to be kept locked up. I just heard a loud, unidentified noise and I was very happy I had my safe nearby. I love my carry gun, but I like the idea of it staying in its holster so the higher capacity gun gets a chance to play.

    I still have no idea what that noise was, but I think I'm safe.[​IMG]
     
  9. Thorsen

    Thorsen New Member

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    To clarify what I was saying, I don't think there should be any requirements for a homeowner, but I can see some safety rules for a foster home. A foster home can have children there for long term stays or for very short ones. As a foster parent you have no idea what level of exposure the children who are coming into your home have to weapons. Additionally, you have no idea as to what their mental health is either. While behavioral problem children are supposed to be classified differently which puts them in different homes that are staffed for their level of need, they are not always done so as Georgia and many other states have a dearth of good foster care available. I know this latter point happens as I have a friend who is involved in running a foster home and she has told me about issues with children who had to be removed from her home due to violence or mental issues that she is not equipped to deal with.
     
  10. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    Foster parents are the closest thing to saints any of us will ever meet!

    Depending on the children, it may be imperative that guns be kept locked securely away or they may be accessible. It all depends on the kids and the parents. However, when kids and guns are concerned, it is always better to err on the side of caution and I hope foster parents realize this.

    Having said that, I applaud the guy Krummel. Although, it appears he's not the only who slapped down Oregon's child care people:


    "Under state law (Oregon Revised Statute 166.170) only the State Legislature can restrict "the sale, acquisition, transfer, ownership, possession, storage, transportation or use of firearms".

    Krummel obtained a legal opinion from Legislative Counsel which read: "Therefore, the provisions of ORS 166.170 limit the power of the department to enact any rules regulating firearms, unless otherwise expressly authorized by state statute."

    The Attorney General’s Office agreed issuing its own ruling stating, "DHS cannot as a condition of receiving a foster care certificate of approval require the foster parent to permit or prohibit access to firearms or ammunition.""



    I just hope to God we don't see something in the news about an Oregon foster kid getting hold of a gun and causing mayhem with it...!
     
  11. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I spoke with a foster agency person in Georgia this weekend, who informed me that there are rules requiring all firearms in the household of a foster parent to be locked up.